Scanner photo negatives: The best film scanners in 2023

Epson Perfection V600 photo scanner review

Digital Camera World Verdict

The Epson Perfection V600 is the quickest and most convenient way to get seriously high-quality film scans at home. It produces images that are near indistinguishable from the more expensive Epson V850, with a resolution of 6400 dpi. It is easy to use and has software that allows for a surprising degree of control if you want it. The V600 includes well-built and intuitive film holders, making it easy and quick for anyone to get started with scanning film quickly without a steep learning curve. It is an excellent choice for anyone looking for a high-quality film scanner that is easy to use and affordable.

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Pros
  • +

    Affordable high quality scans

  • +

    Scans both 35mm and medium format film

  • +

    Batch scan film quickly and easily

Cons
  • Quite large

  • Noisy

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A flatbed scanner is a popular type of scanner that is widely used in homes and offices, as it is a versatile device that can scan a wide range of materials, including documents, photos, and books. Flatbed scanners work by illuminating an object and then capturing the reflected light using a sensor. The resulting image is then digitized and can be saved as a file on a computer or other storage device. 

Read more: See our guide for the best film scanners for digitizing negatives

  • Epson Perfection V600 at Amazon for $257

Flatbed scanners can also be used to scan film negatives such as 35mm or medium format stocks. Flatbed scanners are popular for their ease of use and ability to produce high-quality scans with accurate color reproduction. The Epson V600 offers one of the most affordable ways to achieve high-quality scans of your film, for easy sharing online or preserving treasured memories.

(Image credit: Gareth Bevan / Digital Camera World)

Specifications

Scanner type: Flatbed color image scanner
Optical resolution: 6400 dpi x 9600 dpi
Maximum interpolated resolution: 12800 dpi x 12800 dpi
Color bit depth: 48-bit internal/external
Grayscale bit depth: 16-bit internal/external
Maximum document size: 8. 5″ x 11.7″ (A4/Letter size)
Light source: ReadyScan LED technology
Scanning speed: 16 seconds per 300 dpi color scan, 6 seconds per 600 dpi monochrome scan
Connectivity: Hi-Speed USB 2.0
Supported operating systems: Windows 10, 8/8.1, 7, Vista, XP, Mac OS X 10.6.x to 10.14.x
Dimensions (W x D x H): 279 x 483 x 117mm (11″ x 19″ x 4.6″)
Weight: 4.82kg (9 lbs)

Key features

The Epson Perfection V600 Photo is a flatbed scanner designed for everyone from beginners to professionals. It features a high-quality CCD sensor and can scan documents and photos up to a maximum resolution of 6400 x 9600 dpi. Using LED ReadyScan technology, the V850 can start scanning immediately without having to warm up. The V600 offers fast scanning speeds and can produce a 300 dpi color scan in just 16 seconds and a 600 dpi monochrome scan in just 6 seconds.

One of the key features of the V600 is its ability to handle a wide range of media types, including photos, film negatives, and slides. The V600 has a built-in transparency unit, allowing users to scan film negatives and slides directly, which is a great feature for anyone looking to digitize their old family photos or historical archives.

(Image credit: Gareth Bevan / Digital Camera World)

The V600 comes with two sets of film holders, one for 35mm film strips or slides, and another for medium format film. Additionally, the scanner can handle photo prints up to 8.5×11.7 inches in size or documents up to 8.5×11.7 inches (21.6×29.7cm).

The scanner also comes with Epson Scan software, which allows users to quickly and easily restore old, faded, or damaged photos. Using the inbuilt Digital ICE, the software also has tools for removing dust and scratches from film scans automatically, saving time in editing later.

In terms of connectivity, the V600 connects to a computer via USB 2.0, and uses a USB Type-A connector, but lacks any wireless connectivity. The V600 is compatible with both Windows and Mac operating systems, with compatible software and drivers available from Epson’s website.

(Image credit: Gareth Bevan / Digital Camera World)

Build & handling

The V600 is quite large, although this is to be expected from flatbed scanners, and the scanner is light enough to be easily moved around, or put into storage when not being used. The scanner itself is made from tough-feeling black plastic in a mix of mottled and smooth finishes which are both fingerprint magnets, it won’t win any beauty contests, but it also doesn’t look bad sitting on a desk.

The lid opens and closes with some small clunks and creaks which are a little disconcerting at first, but it still feels solid and sturdy enough that I would be confident in it surviving for a long time. The lid also has two catch points, one at 45 degrees and one at 90 degrees, which is useful for areas without a lot of space.

(Image credit: Gareth Bevan / Digital Camera World)

Along the front of the scanner are a series of buttons that operate functions in the Epson Scan or PhotoFix apps with one touch. These are very useful for anyone who just wants to quickly digitize films without any additional control over the output for creative purposes. A blue light on the front indicates when it is scanning so you don’t accidentally open the lid if you can’t hear the quite significant amount of noise the scanner makes while scanning.

The included film folders are good, although they feel a little flimsy with quite a lot of flex in their thin plastic, I am not heavy-handed, but I would be worried that someone might break them if they were rushing or being less thoughtful. There is also only one set of film holders included which feels a little like cost-cutting, as a second set is useful for speeding up a scanning workflow, as you can load while the scanner scans.

The film holders are very easy and intuitive to load, however, with 35mm and medium format film slotting nicely into its place, and an additional frame clips the film down flat for an even scan. The clips are a little fiddly, and sometimes just seem unwilling to clip into place properly and require more force than feels sensible, but they do their job admirably.

(Image credit: Gareth Bevan / Digital Camera World)

Performance

Starting with the software experience, the Epson Scan software is pretty good for bundled scanning software. If your goal is to get quick and easy scans to archive some memories, or quickly share them, then this software can accomplish it in a few clicks. The software will also automatically separate out each frame on a consecutive series into individual JPEG or TIF files. 

For more advanced users, the Epson Scan software offers some fine-grained control over your images when you dig into the settings, with options for color and lighting balance corrections. These options are not at the forefront through and require more clicks and windows than is ideal if you are using them regularly. Although the V600 will also work with VueScan or Silverfast if either is already in your workflow. 

(Image credit: Gareth Bevan)

(Image credit: Gareth Bevan)

The V600 scans are excellent at native 6400dpi, with crisp detail, although the photos without any tuning due come out with quite subdued color. You can easily stop down to 4800dpi or 3200dpi the scans remain excellent, and even with pixel peeping there is no perceptible difference. Scanning at smaller resolutions is much quicker, and unless you wish to print your images on a very large scale, then 6400dpi might well be overkill for use online and on social media where images are heavily compressed.

A JPEG image scanned at 6400dpi gave a file size of approximately 50MB, while a TIF was approximately 350MB but offers a much wider range of colors for post-scan editing including 48-bit color. This offers a much greater flexibility to not get all the settings right immediately, although at file sizes that are much more processor-intensive to edit.

(Image credit: Gareth Bevan)

(Image credit: Gareth Bevan)

In terms of speed, in my testing, scanning a single frame at 6400dpi took around 1 minute and 30 seconds to scan the image, however it took 4 minutes and 30 seconds with infrared dust removal scan as well.

The infrared dust removal however is really good. And although you can scan faster without it, I would argue that it is almost essential to leave it on. The Digital ICE is not flawless, a lot of dust managed to slip past the filter, but it was considerably better than not using the infrared scan at all, and will save hours of editing later.

Verdict

The Epson Perfection V600 is probably the fastest and easiest way to get seriously high quality film scans at home, with quality that is near imperceptible to what is produced by the much more expensive Epson V850. 

With easy to use software that can get surprisingly deep if you want more control, the V600 produces very large, sharp and color balanced images at 6400dpi, although for archiving or social media, you can get just as good results at lower resolutions. Well built with intuitive to use film holders, it is simple and quick for anyone to get up and running with scanning film fast without a big learning curve.

  • The best film scanners
  • The best 3D scanner
  • The best scanner for documents & photos
  • The best book scanner
  • The best slide viewers

Epson Perfection V600: Price Comparison

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Gareth is a photographer based in London, working as a freelance photographer and videographer for the past several years, having the privilege to shoot for some household names. With work focusing on fashion, portrait and lifestyle content creation, he has developed a range of skills covering everything from editorial shoots to social media videos. Outside of work, he has a personal passion for travel and nature photography, with a devotion to sustainability and environmental causes.

Pixl-latr review | Digital Camera World

Digital Camera World Verdict

This simple yet clever device is about as basic as film scanning solutions come; it’s purely a film holder that evenly diffuses light across the film plane. This simple device removes much of the high cost and complexity associated with digitizing film, and even if you don’t have a lightbox you can position the Pixl-latr vertically in front of a window using the included stand, although using a lightbox for backlighting is the best option by far. At around $50 / £45, this simple device is a breath of fresh air for film photographers and those who simply wish to digitise old films on a budget.

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Pros
  • +

    Easy to use

  • +

    Extremely cost-effective

  • +

    Detailed online instructions

  • +

    Great results are possible

Cons
  • Needs lightbox for best results

  • Camera must be perfectly square

  • Copy stands better than tripods

  • Standard scanners more convenient

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Our expert reviewers spend hours testing and comparing products and services so you can choose the best for you. Find out how we test.

The Pixl-latr meets a current and growing need right now. Analog photography is continually growing in popularity as younger photographers explore the medium for the first time, and even some more experienced photographers have also started shooting film again. Add to this all the film people have shot in the past and it quickly becomes apparent how much demand there continues to be for film scanning.

Related articles

Film scanning is notoriously expensive when done at a professional lab, and while there are dedicated film scanners and flatbed scanners available for film scanning at home, these can vary wildly in price and image quality, especially if you need to scan medium format and large format film. These, however, can provide a cost-effective solution for photographers with large image catalog, but there is another option.

  • Pixl-latr at BHPhoto for $54.99

The Pixl-latr is part of a new generation of film digitization solutions focusing on the use of a film holder that’s positioned on a lightbox where you can either use a tripod or copy stand to support your camera with ideally a macro lens attached to shoot the film.  

There are other similar film holders available for digitizing film this, but the Pixl-latr provides a great balance between cost-effectiveness and image quality, making it an extremely attractive option at around $50 / £45 and perhaps less.

The Pixl-latr does need some careful camera alignments and, ideally, a macro lens, but it’s a lot cheaper than a film scanner (Image credit: James Abbott)

Specifications

Construction: Plastic
Formats supported: 35mm, 120 and 5×4 film
Illumination: Any (ideally, a lightbox)
Camera/lens: Macro lens (ideally)

Key features

(Image credit: James Abbott)

The Pixl-latr is a plastic film holder that can be configured to securely hold 35mm, 120 and 5×4 film in place during digitization. As you’d expect, a lightbox is the quickest, easiest and most effective illumination method when shot from above using a DSLR or mirrorless camera with a macro lens attached; simply shoot in aperture priority at f/11 with ISO at 100, and adjust exposure compensation as required for correct exposure. The Pixl-latr website provides detailed instructions on how to digitize film using the device, so you can’t go wrong. 

The Pixl-latr is made up of 10 parts; these include ‘gates’ for creating different sized apertures for film formats, a diffuser to even out backlight and feet that allow you to stand the Pixl-latr upright so you can use window light or a desk lamp for illumination.

The genius of the overall design is the diffuser on the back of the Pixl-latr, which features a lightly textured surface designed to spread light evenly and prevent Newton rings when film is in contact with the diffuser. (Newton rings are a circular pattern that occurs when light refracts between two surfaces placed in contact.) 

Performance, quality, usability

You’ll probably need to do some spot removal, but that’s easy in a program like Lightroom. Otherwise, as digitized film images go, this one looks very good indeed. (Image credit: James Abbott)

Image quality mostly comes down to the quality of the negative or transparency being scanned, as well as whether the camera and lens are square to the Pixl-latr and film plane. Of course, ensuring that the film occupies the central area of the (camera) frame is also important because lenses are typically sharper in the centre than at the edges. 

A macro lens is best for digitization, but a standard zoom such as a 24-70mm would be sufficient. Shooting with a macro lens allows you to maximize the pixels of your camera sensor by shooting as close to the film surface as possible, not to mention that macro lenses are designed for close work so they can resolve fine detail extremely well, but you could also use a standard zoom such as a 24-70mm.

Here’s a finished scan of the image above. It’s a really nice result, and the Pixl-latr makes it possible to get good-quality to compare with those from dedicated film scanners – and these get very expensive with medium format and 5×4″ originals. (Image credit: James Abbott)

Another scan sample from Pixl-latr. You need to take some care over the camera setup, and you may need to do some spot removal later, but it’s worth it to get results like this. (Image credit: James Abbott)

Image quality overall is impressive despite the low cost and seemingly simple design of the Pixl-latr. The most time-consuming part of the process, other than getting the camera and lens square on to the film plane to avoid distortion, is dust spotting once you’ve digitized images. But this is a problem with any scanning solution, so it always pays to use an air blower to remove as much dust from the film surface as possible. 

Verdict

(Image credit: James Abbott)

This simple yet clever device is about as basic as film scanning solutions come because it’s purely a film holder that evenly diffuses light across the film plane. The Pixl-latr removes much of the high cost and complexity associated with digitizing film, and even if you don’t have a lightbox you can position the Pixl-latr vertically in front of a window or desk lamp using the included stand, although using a lightbox for backlighting is the best option by far. 

At around $50 / £45, depending on where you shop, this device is a breath of fresh air for film photographers and those who simply wish to digitize old films on a budget. For the best results, an inexpensive lightbox and copy stand are essential, although great results can be achieved using a tripod with an articulating centre column, or indeed one with the centre column inserted into the legs upside down to get the camera close to and directly above the Pixl-latr.

Read more:

• Best film scanner
• Best film cameras
• How to scan film
• Best photo and document scanners

Pixl-latr: Price Comparison

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James Abbott is a landscape and portrait photographer based in Cambridge. He’s also an experienced photography journalist specializing in camera skills and Photoshop techniques. He is also a CAA-approved drone pilot and professional aerial photographer.

The best applications for digitizing negatives for Android

Negatives in photography are gone for a while. However, they were a milestone in the industry as they allowed those photos to be saved quickly and quickly on paper. It seemed their days were numbered, but luckily we will be able to digitize these negatives from Android .

In fact, the process of developing and emulsifying it is a characteristic element that in many cases is reproduced on films, but now it can be done with a simple application. It won’t be the same result as a professional scanner, but it’s a more affordable way to give a second life to negatives we haven’t developed yet.

Index

  • 1 HELMUT Film Scanner
  • 2 Photonegative Scanner
  • 3 KODAK Mobile Film Scanner
  • 4 Negative Image – Invert Image
  • 5 Picto Scanner
  • 6 Negative Image
  • 7 Lightbox Free
  • 8 Pixeq Effect
  • 9 Photonegative scanner
  • 10 Negative image scanner
  • 11 FilmLab, for analog films

HELMUT 9 film scanner0035

It has an algorithm to apply the appropriate color to the scanned negative. Based on the updates, the app has cleaned up its interface, making it more minimalistic, making it easier to navigate and navigate through its options. Count on your ‘s own camera shutter to make the process much easier.

Film Scanner HELMUT

Developer:
codeunited.dk

Price:
It’s free

Photonegative scanner

Its interface is very reminiscent of Material Design, but very minimalistic. A curious detail is that before taking a photo, just with the application open, the camera already shows the contents of negative real-time . After taking a photo, we can cut and select only what we want to receive.

Photonegative Scanner: Viewer and

Developer:
Frapplabs

Price:
It’s free

KODAK Mobile Film Scanner

The mythical Kodak camera company also wanted to join this cause to restore the old moments that were recorded on these negatives. To do this, he uses a system similar to what has already been commented on this subject, but with two additional features. The app also scans positives and negatives in black and white.

KODAK Mobile Film Scanner

Pictoscanner

Price:
It’s free

Negative Image – Invert Image

An application using the same methodology, although several retouches can be applied when scanning negatives to digitize them into images, one of which is to different RGB colors to make them look different from what was originally. In addition, it is possible to scan negatives in black and white, as well as edit their size.

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Negative image – inverted image,

Developer:
KADA Studio

Price:
It’s free

Picto Scanner

You can scan positives, color photographs that look like the original portrait, black and white negatives, and regular negatives. It also has a zoom mode to enlarge the area of ​​the image that we are most interested in.

Picto Scanner

Developer:
Pictoscanner

Price:
It’s free

Negative image

We can do both negative scan and reverse scan. In other words, we can select images from the gallery and give them the effect as if they were a negative. Unfortunately, this versatility is limited in the free version, so if we want to access these options, we will have to pay.

Negative image

Developer:
Firsoft

Price:
It’s free

Lightboxes Free

With a slightly more unreliable interface than others, but with a different purpose. It tries to turn the device into a slideshow in which to view the negatives we have, so it should not be confused with an editor.

Lightbox

Developer:
Fancy Otter

Price:
It’s free

Pixeq 9 effect0035

This application does just the opposite. Instead of scanning negatives, apply this effect to images from your gallery. It has several of them, such as the “Cross-Process” emulation effect, one of the most famous in this tone range.

Pixeq Effect Photo Free

Auri

Price:
It’s free

Photo Negative Scanner

It has several features that, like many others we have included in this list, allow you to both scan negatives to digitize them, and convert current images to this old format. In addition, it contains a fairly simple and clear interface, no designs loaded with decorative elements.

Negative Image – Negative Photo Scanner

Developer:
Kalistan SoftTek

Price:
It’s free

Negative Image Scanner

Another application that allows you to apply various filters in a simple way when applying filters to images in our gallery. This is achieved by inverting colors to give the effect achieved with negatives in photographs, although unfortunately this is useless for scanning.

Negative Image – Negative Image Scanner

Developer:
Pars Won

Price:
It’s free

FilmLab, for analog films

The only thing you have to do in this application is to put the negatives on a surface with light. You put your cell phone with the app open, which automatically detects the negative and gives you a preview of the photo. You will see this photo in color as if it had already been developed. You can save this photo to your mobile phone in high resolution if you want later, print it or view it on a big screen.

FilmLab, for analog films

Developer:
Development and Correction, Inc.

Price:
It’s free

Digitization of photographs and negatives

Faded and discolored photographs have been given a new life digitally. Posted by John Wade

Every family has a story, and every story has its photographs: old color prints, vintage black and white photographs, negatives and films. If this sounds like your situation, why not drag these photo archives into the 21st century? By digitizing old photos, you can breathe new life into them, you can easily retouch and categorize them, and then put them in a convenient place.

How to scan old photos and films the right way

Digitizing photos with your phone

It’s usually not enough to just use your phone’s camera to scan an old photo. The resulting image will most likely be distorted due to the uneven position of the phone, and unwanted reflections and glare will most likely be noticeable in the photo itself. To get rid of these problems, it is enough to use a special application.

PhotoScan by Google Photos is a completely free photo digitizing application. At first you just take a photo. Then you need to alternately point the phone’s camera at four points along the edges of the photo card – each time the application will automatically take a new picture. When the scanning process is over, the application combines all versions into one, getting rid of glare and reflections, as well as correcting colors and distortion. PhotoScan has many analogues, so you are sure to find something suitable for you.

Photo taken using an iPhone under table lamp lighting, causing a large amount of flare in the photo. The second attempt was made using PhotoScan. Author: John Wade

Is it better to use a scanner or a camera to digitize photos?

A more advanced method after digitizing with a phone is to use a camera. You’ll need a macro lens to get close enough, and the camera itself needs to be parallel to the surface. For lighting, you can use a table lamp, and preferably two – one on each side. Natural light from a window is also good. This way, only printed photos can be digitized. To convert the film to digital form, instead of lamps, you need to use a lightbox.

Scanners are a much better way to digitize old photographs. In the case of a flatbed scanner, the photo is placed on the glass, after which special software generates a preliminary version, then the correct cropping, resolution and color depth are selected, after which the finished image is saved to the hard drive. The scanner can also be used to digitize film.

In addition to consumer flatbed scanners, there are special film and negative scanners, usually sharpened for 35mm format, although some models allow you to work with larger formats. A roll of film is fed into the input of such a scanner and then scanned frame by frame.

How to adjust the color balance

If you digitize a photo using artificial lighting, you may end up with a yellow/orange cast as a result. This is because in Standard mode the camera is set to shoot in daylight, and artificial light often has a warmer tint. By setting the white balance to automatic, you will most likely get an acceptable result, however, in some cases it makes sense to set it manually. Recall that daylight and electronic flashes have a temperature of 5000 K, and an incandescent lamp is 2700-3000 K. Set the appropriate temperature manually and see if it helps.

Another option is to use fluorescent lamps, they just have a temperature of around 5000 K. You can also always correct the white balance in post-processing in Lightroom.

Photo tint under incandescent lighting (left) and after adjusting the camera’s white balance (right).

How to scan photos for the best resolution and color depth

When using a scanner, the resolution set in the program depends on the size of the original and the subsequent use of the digitized photos. Most scanning software measures resolution in dots per inch (dpi).

If you plan to simply view a digitized image on a computer screen or digital projector, the size should be no more than 600×800 pixels. This means that a 35mm negative or slide needs to be scanned at 600 dpi, and in the case of a large A4 print, 72 dpi will be enough to achieve the same number of pixels.

If you plan to print scanned photos, the resolution should be much higher, around 3500×2500 pixels. In this case, 35mm film should be scanned at 2500 dpi, and for A4 format 300 dpi will suffice.

The scanning software also allows you to adjust the color depth, typically between 16 and 48 bits. This value corresponds to the amount of color information stored in the image. The more bits allocated for storing color information, the higher the quality and color accuracy will be. For most situations, 24 bits is sufficient.

Monochrome photograph, scanned in color and converted to B&W. Enhanced sharpness, adjusted contrast, creased with the Stamp tool. Author: John Wade

Retouching digitized photos

There are many simple Photoshop techniques that even beginners can use to get the most out of digitized photos. Sometimes, after scanning, photos become too contrasty, or, conversely, you need to get a more contrasting image from a faded photo card. In both cases, the Contrast tool, which is located in the menu Image> Adjustments> Brightness / Contrast (Image> Adjustments> Brightness / Contrast), will help.

Old photographs taken with non-professional cameras are often slightly washed out. This can usually be corrected, although not completely. Just use the Unsharp Mask tool. To find it, go to the menu Filter> Sharpen> Unsharp mask (Filter> Sharpen> Unsharp mask).

An old, faded photograph from the 70s, restored with Photoshop’s Levels and Color Balance adjustments. Author: John Wade

Fade and color balance

The ultraviolet component of daylight breaks down the chemicals in the ink used to print photographs, causing them to fade. At the same time, different colors are affected by ultraviolet light in different ways, which is why old photographs usually have a magenta tint. Fading can be corrected with Levels. To do this, go to the menu Image> Corrections> Levels (Image> Adjustments> Levels). To correct the hue of the photo, the corresponding tool is also used, located in the menu Image> Corrections> Color balance (Image> Adjustments> Color balance). Just drag the sliders to the right for colors that are complementary to the hue you want to correct. Green is the complement of magenta, cyan is the complement of red, and yellow is the complement of blue.

The best way to fix cracks and bruises is with the Clone Tool and the Healing Brush. The stamp allows you to manually select pixels from a specific area and fill cracks with them. The healing brush automatically selects the most appropriate pixels around the treated area.

These simple techniques will help your digital asset photos look even better than the originals.

How to digitize very old photographs

If photography has been something familiar to your family for a long time, it is quite possible that you have a couple of daguerreotypes or ambrotypes at home. Before the advent of the digital age, both of these species were very difficult to copy. Ambrotypes were made on glass and reflected light very strongly. Daguerreotypes are even worse in this regard – they were applied to silver-plated copper with an almost perfectly mirror surface. Trying to simply take a picture of such a “memory mirror”, you will not only get reflections of surrounding objects, but also bright spots of light and even a reflection of the camera lens itself.

What photographers of past centuries could not imagine was the advent of digital technology. Now both ambrotypes and daguerreotypes can be easily digitized using a conventional scanner. However, it is likely that you will need to increase the contrast of the resulting copy.

Even ancient daguerreotypes from the late 1800s can be easily digitized. Author: John Wade

Ten Tips for Digitizing Photos

  1. Gather old photographs and sort them into categories: family and generations, forgotten holidays, creative shots you took for a photo contest years ago, pets, children, cars, vacation, etc.
  2. Sort them by year, people, places or other categories.
  3. Separate good quality photos that you can digitize right away from those that you have to tinker with by correcting contrast, fading, cracks and creasing, and other minor imperfections.
  4. Select the capture method: macro lens camera or scanner.
  5. If you have the choice of scanning a printout or a negative, it’s best to choose the latter. This will give you more details.
  6. Use a scanner whose software supports Image Correction and Enhancement ( ). In this case, infrared light is used during the initial scan to detect scratches, dust, and fingerprints. The software then compares the two versions of the photo and fixes the defects.
  7. If you don’t have a lightbox, you can replace it with a special illuminated tablet that artists use to sketch or draw.
  8. The

  9. iPad or other tablet with a dedicated app installed (e.g. ) can also be used as a lightbox replacement.
  10. Scan everything in color. Black and white photos can be converted later. It’s also a good idea to create a sepia effect to emphasize the era in which the picture was taken.
  11. Gently remove dust and hair from the negatives before scanning them. Wipe the scanner glass with a soft cloth to remove dust, hair, and fingerprints.

Equipment

  • Stand . You need a model that will allow you to fix the camera directly above the photo or install it between the legs of a tripod and put a lightbox under it.
  • Lightbox or equivalent . Old-fashioned models can be found on eBay or bought from hand. More modern equivalents can be purchased at most stores.
  • Spirit level .