Negatives scanner: Best Slide & Negative Scanners

Canon CanoScan 9000F Mark II review

Digital Camera World Verdict

If you want a scanner that can handle the day-to-day running of your photography business while also being able to scan 35mm film all the way up to 120 medium format (with either positives or negatives), the Canon CanoScan 9000F Mark II is the best option. It’s extremely capable of scanning a whole roll of 35mm in minutes and if you progress into medium format film, you are not left looking at other options.

TODAY’S BEST DEALS

Pros
  • +

    9,600 DPI films scans

  • +

    All-in-one design/function

  • +

    Scans 120 and 35mm film

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Film photography has seen a resurgence like no one ever expected, from old users going back for nostalgia purposes to millennials and Gen-Z picking up film photography for the first time.  If you’ve been shooting with one of the best film cameras and or want to scan in old negatives, you’ll need the best film scanner. 

Once scanned, your negatives can be edited via computer, printed on a large scale, or shared on social media – all without setting foot into a darkroom.

  • Canon Canoscan 9000F Mark II at Amazon for $709.99

The vast appeal of the Canon Canonscan 9000F Mark II is that this flatbed scanner, which is also a good scanner for documents and photos, has a built-in light for scanning your 35mm or 120 medium format film. With a simple click to remove the whiteboard cover for documents, the added light source is exposed to help you get quality scans out of your color or black-and-white negatives.

Read more: Here’s how to scan film if you’re not sure.

Canon CanoScan 900F Mark II Specifications

Image sensor: CCD 12-line color
Light source: White LED
Max scan resolution: 9600 dpi for film / 4,800 for photos/documents
Color: 48-bit input, 48/24-bit output
Grayscale: 48-bit input,16-bit for film / 8-bit output for photos/documents
Dynamic range: n/a
Infrared: Built-in
Scanning speed: 4800 dpi Color – approx. 4 minutes per image / B&W 4800 dpi – approx. 3 minutes
Scanning area (W x L): 216 x 297mm
Interface: USB 2.0
Net weight: 4.6kg / 10.14 Ibs
Dimensions (W x D x H): 270 x 480 x 111mm
Operating system: Windows XP onwards / Mac OS X 10.6.8 onwards
Bundled software: ScanGear, Scan Utility, My Image Garden

(Image credit: Future)

Canon Canoscan 9000F Mark II Key features

This flatbed scanner is capable of scanning photos or documents to a massive 4,800 DPI. It’s also able to automatically allow the scanner to choose the right settings for documents, and auto selects for simply greyscale or color pdf scanning, while also being able to scan a document or photo and have it email-ready thanks to the handy email button provided on the front of the scanner. These seven buttons are a very quick and handy solution when you have multiple documents or photos that you need to send off or sign in a day.

However, the best features are saved for film photographers. One key feature of the Canon CanoScan 900F Mark II is its ability to be able to scan 35mm film, 120 medium format and slides without much hassle.

This is done by removing the whiteboard held within the scanner to reveal an additional white LED light source that helps to scan your negatives or slides. Supplied with the 9000F Mark II are three film holders that allow you to scan 12 frames of 35mm film at a time, 4 slides or 120 format film at a maximum 6cm x 22cm filmstrip to a massive 9,800 DPI.

This makes the CanoScan 9000F Mark II one of the most versatile flatbed scanners on the market today offering a competitive solution for photographers wanting an all-in-one solution. 

(Image credit: Future)

Canon Canonscan 9000F Mark II Build & Handling

Material

Like many scanners today, the Canon CanoScan 9000F Mark II is made from hard-duty plastic, which can stand up to a world of abuse. After five years and many house moves, it still produces fantastic results today.

Durability

If you’re the type that moves around a lot or simply does not have the desk space for it constantly – or only needs a film scanner when you shoot the occasional film – Canon actually equipped the 9000F Mark II with a locking switch that will lock the whole scanning mechanism in place so you are less likely to damage or misalign anything while in transit or in storage.

Size

This is a full A4 flatbed document scanner, and therefore it does take up a large amount of space either on your desk or table stand. I currently have mine mounted onto my PC case and it does just fine there, but if you want a more stable solution you might have to rearrange your current computer setup if you’re anything like me and have more than one or two monitors.

Flimsy film holders 

Also, even though in my five years of ownership I have never had a problem with the film holders, they are made out of flimsy plastic and don’t feel like the most premium items. I tend to bear this in mind each time I use and treat them rather delicately. I’ve never had an issue, but it’s worth being made aware of in case you want to try this scanner out for yourself.

(Image credit: Future)

Canon CanoScan 9000F Mark II Performance

The CanoScan 9000F Mark II performance for document scanning is outstanding, I find the standard settings that Canon has applied are perfect for producing 300 DPI PDFs or JPEGs and are only a few MBs each, perfect for quickly sending across on email.

I have found scanning a whole mortgage document of 20-odd pages a total breeze thanks to the added benefit of ScanUtility having the option to ‘scan again’ to scan multiple pages and then incorporate them into a single PDF, this makes office life so much simpler and means that your time is not affected too much either, so it’s a win/win scenario. 

Now film scanning is where things get interesting, the included ScanGear software is great for beginners to scan film, it will automatically detect if you’re wanting to scan either color or black and white film and will scan between 2,400 or 4,800 DPI.  

For the more advanced users, the included ScanGear software has an advanced feature where you can manually input for film settings, if you want your converted negatives as JPEGs, TIFFs, or as a DNG RAW file, while also being able to scan from 300 DPI all the way up to the whopping 9,600 DPI. 

With testing various settings on different film formats  I found that the sweet spot for optimal performance if you just want to scan your negatives once and file them away would be to set the scanner to 4,800 DPI. Depending on if you scan color or B&W this usually takes around 4 minutes per image – so it’s a long process, but worth it.

I tend to use a workflow of scanning a whole roll of film at 1,200 DPI and once I have found the images I like I then re-scan the negatives at 4,800 DPI, RAW DNG for Color and TIFFs for Black and white negatives. 

For those wondering about the CanoScan’s 9,600 DPI setting, I find this to have no real benefit over 4,800 DPI and it will bring your already long 4 minutes up to between 8-10minutes per image. .. if you have time for that, then set it to 9,600 DPI, but if you want a solid workflow setup for scanning multiple rolls in a day, leave it a 4,800 DPI. 

35mm scan at 2,400 DPI (Image credit: Sebastian Oakley/ Digital Camera World)

35mm B&W 1,200 DPI scan (Image credit: Sebastian Oakley / Digital Camera World)

120 scan at 4,800 DPI (Image credit: Sebastian Oakley / Digital Camera World)

Canon CanoScan 9000F Mark II Verdict

(Image credit: Future)

If you’re looking for a scanner that can handle the day-to-day running of your photography business, signing contracts, and sending them off to clients – or you need old printed photos – the Canon CanoScan 9000F Mark II can do all those things perfectly. 

If you’re looking for a scanner that can help you scan 35mm and 120 film then the Canon CanoScan 9000F Mark II is the best option. This is a scanner that can grow with your photography.

This scanner will automatically convert your color negatives or slide film for ease of use. More advanced users can scan a full DNG in 16-Bit to have a workable file to convert in either Adobe Lightroom or Photoshoot. It’s a scanner that can cater to every photographer’s needs.


If you are interested in finding out more about how to scan your negative film properly, you can read our guide to how to scan negatives and transparencies

You can also find the film scanner for your needs in our guides to the best film scanners, or to view your mounted slides before you scan them, you can check out our guide to the best slide viewers.

Canon Canoscan 9000F Mark II: Price Comparison

$1,039.99

$709.99

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$1,099.99

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$1,299.99

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For nearly two decades Sebastian’s work has been published internationally. Originally specialising in Equestrianism, his visuals have been used by the leading names in the equestrian industry such as The Fédération Equestre Internationale (FEI), The Jockey Club, Horse & Hound and many more for various advertising campaigns, books and pre/post-event highlights.

He is a Fellow of The Royal Society of Arts, holds a Foundation Degree in Equitation Science and is a Master of Arts in Publishing.  He is member of Nikon NPS and has been a Nikon user since the film days using a Nikon F5 and saw the digital transition with Nikon’s D series cameras and is still to this day the youngest member to be elected in to BEWA, The British Equestrian Writers’ Association. 

He is familiar with and shows great interest in medium and large format photography with products by Phase One, Hasselblad, Alpa and Sinar and has used many cinema cameras from the likes of Sony, RED, ARRI and everything in between. His work covers the genres of Equestrian, Landscape, Abstract or Nature and combines nearly two decades of experience to offer exclusive limited-edition prints to the international stage from his film & digital photography.

8 Best Film Scanners Worth Using in 2023

All the best film scanners and slide scanners we tested on this list make it easy for you to digitize your old 35mm negatives, slides and even cine film.

Whether you’ve just discovered analog photography and want to scan film negatives, or you’ve got boxes of old slides you want to bring back to life, a film scanner will help you convert everything to digital.

Editor’s Choice

Plustek 8200i

Fast, high quality and simple to use way to scan color and mono negatives, as well as 35mm slide positives.

Check Current Price

(This is different from our article on the best photo scanners, which recommends products for scanning actual physical photographs as opposed to film.)

You can get decent results from a regular flatbed scanner when used in conjunction with a film holder, and there are even some film scanning apps for smartphones. 

However, a dedicated flatbed film scanner offers the best results, squeezing out every last detail from your print scans, allowing you to enhance and restore old photos during digital post-production.  

So if you’d prefer to have a go at your home instead of using an online photo scanning service, here are our recommended products for getting the job done yourself.

Table of Contents

What is the Best Film Scanner to Buy in 2023?

Image Product Features
Plustek 8200iOUR #1 CHOICE
  • Automatic Dust Removal
  • Built-in Color Calibration
  • High Resolution 7200dpi Sensor
  • Built-in Infrared Channel
View Price →
Kodak Slide N ScanTOP RATED
  • Instant Preview Option
  • PC/Mac Compatible
  • Lightweight at Only 380g 
  • Large 5” LCD Display
View Price →
Kodak ScanzaEASY TO USE
  • PC/Mac Compatible
  • Adjustable 3.5” Color LCD Screen 
  • Simple to Operate
  • Super Simple Software
View Price →
Magnasonic All-In-OneGREAT VALUE
  • Large 22 Megapixel Scanner
  • Film & Slide Compatibility
  • User-Friendly Scanning
  • Generous 128MB Built-in Storage
View Price →
Kodak Mobile Film ScannerBEST BUDGET
  • Easy Opterating Interface
  • No Hardware Needed
  • Extremely Compact Design
  • Iphone Compatible
View Price →
Epson Perfection V600POPULAR CHOICE
  • Automatic Dust Removal
  • Faded Color Restoration Hardware
  • Scans Extraordinary Large 17″ x 22″
  • PC/Mac Compatible
View Price →
Magnatonic Super 8/8mm Film ScannerHIGHLY RECOMMENDED
  • No Computer needed
  • User-Friendly Scanning
  • Simple to Operate
  • Instant Preview Option
View Price →
Epson Perfection V850 Pro scannerBEST FOR BUSINESS
  • Remarkable Tonal Range & Shadow Detail
  • Automatic Dust Removal
  • Color Restoration Hardware
  • Exclusive Dual Lens System
View Price →

 

Plustek 8200i | Best 35mm film scanner

Pros

  • Automatically removes dust and scratches
  • SilverFast scanning software
  • 7,200 DPI
  • Scans 35mm color and mono negatives, as well as 35mm slide positives

Cons

  • High price point
  • Max resolution scanning takes time

Check current price

We can’t put together slide scanner reviews without mentioning at least one 35mm film scanner from Plustek.

The Plustek 8200i remains one of the better film scanners available to both amateur and professional film photographers alike. Scan quality stands at 7,200 DPI, which is respectable for something in this price range.

You still need a computer to work the Plustek 8200i. The SilverFast scanning software works between the computer and film scanner to produce high-quality scans of various negatives and slides.

Thankfully, when we tested the Plustek, connecting it up to a computer and using the software was an easy process and one that even elderly folk could manage.

You can quickly scan both color and mono 35mm film on the Plustek 8200i. You can also scan 35mm slide positives as well, making it a really useful product for digitizing all your film memories.

The infrared scanning channel on this film scanner helps to produce quality scans. Plus, the software works to remove dust and scratches automatically.

Unlike other scanners, the Plustek 8200i won’t save your photos. Scanning slides at maximum resolution can take a while as well.

However, it’s still our pick of the best negative scanner of the year at this price.

  • What is the best photo scanning software?

Kodak Slide N Scan

Pros

  • No software required
  • 5-inch screen
  • Continuos film scanning
  • Scans 110, 126, and 135 films

Cons

  • Requires SD card
  • Not the best for professional scanning results

Check current price

Kodak makes scanning images easy with the Kodak Slide N Scan. As one of the more prominent slide scanners on the market, it’s a no-brainer for transferring old photos to digital format.

(Even though the name mentioned ‘Slide,’ this product isn’t actually a 35mm slide scanner – it scans negative strips, not individual slides.)

The Kodak Slide N Scan works with an SD card that can hold up to 32GB. It also comes with a USB and HDMI cable to hook up to your computer or TV.

The 5-inch LCD screen helps you to preview images as well as fine-tune them.  You can even use the screen as an electronic picture frame if you’d like.

While this Kodak scanner is limited to certain sizes, they include 50mm slides, along with 110, 126, and 135mm films. You can also continuously load the film to speed up scanning.

During our tests, scan quality wasn’t the absolute best on this film scanner, but it does make it easy to transfer photos to digital format.

Kodak Scanza

Pros

  • Portable
  • LCD screen tilts
  • Large buttons for navigation
  • Supports a variety of film formats

Cons

  • Scan quality is not the best
  • Basic functions

Check current price

 If you just want to try your hand at scanning film, you should check out the Kodak Scanza. This product supports 35mm film, as well as 110, 126, and Super 8/8mm negatives and slides.

The Kodak features a tilting LCD screen, from which you can operate your film scanner. This particular model features large buttons that help you move between photos with ease.

The one-step Scan and Save feature makes it easy to scan old reels and slides. You can even customize the images to make them your own.

Kodak allows you to save your scanned photos to an SD card. You can also share them via USB and HDMI cables to your computer and TV.

Professional photographers might find the scanning results of this product lackluster when compared to others.

However, when it comes to amateur photography, Kodak Scanza can help you digitize your film and slides to share for years to come.

It’s our pick as the best film and slide scanner at this affordable price point.

Magnasonic All-In-One

Pros

  • Scans film quickly
  • 128MB internal memory
  • No software required
  • Affordable negative film scanner

Cons

  • No batch scanning feature
  • Limited resolution

Check current price

Marketed as an all-in-one scanner, Magnasonic All-In-One features the ability to preview your photo before you scan it. This can be incredibly helpful for adjusting your settings to produce the best scan possible.

You also won’t need any type of software to make the Magnasonic work. Scanned images can be saved to the SD card or they can be stored within the internal memory.

The SD card saves film up to 128GB, while the internal storage is limited to 128MB. Plus, the screen makes it easy to interact with the scanner before and after you scan.

The Magnasonic All-In-One supports 35mm film, as well s 110, 126, and Super 8. This scanner produces scans of 3,200 DPI in quick fashion.

As a versatile scanning platform, this scanner includes many a feature to make it worthwhile.

Kodak Mobile Film Scanner

Pros

  • Collapsible
  • Entry-level pricing
  • Versatile application
  • Incorporated light source

Cons

  • May not fit all phones
  • Relies on smartphone camera quality

Check current price

You might have wanted to take pictures of your old photos with your smartphone camera, and the Kodak Mobile Film Scanner makes this a simple reality.

Resting your iPhone or Android smartphone on the box, you can easily take scans of your favorite pictures to convert them to digital format.

This scanner is collapsible so easy to travel with. It’s also really affordable. The converter uses a cardboard box and light to produce quality scans you can feature in any picture frame.

Kodak’s mobile scanner supports 35mm film and negatives. You simply hook it up to your phone and start taking pictures to save your best pictures.

Obviously, you are relying on how good your phone’s image quality is, so the better the camera phone, the better the end results. You’ll also need good lighting in the room – we recommend natural window light, or use the scanner outside on a sunny day.

Epson Perfection V600

Pros

  • 12,800 DPI resolution
  • Medium format support
  • versatile flatbed scanner
  • Multi-frame scanning

Cons

  • Better detail from other scanners
  • Can be expensive

Check current price

This flatbed scanner from Epson features a slew of scanning abilities that will earn the space it takes up on your desk. Plus, it’s a quality flatbed scanner you can use for other applications as well.

The Epson Perfection V600 is capable of scanning up to 12,800 DPI, which is one of the top scanning resolutions on the market. In fact, this flatbed scanner will scan a frame at 3,200 DPI within a minute.

  • DPI vs PPI: What’s the difference?

Though it requires a computer to function, the Epson Perfection V600 also includes support for medium format film. It will also go through and scan each frame individually to get the best results.

In addition to supporting medium format, this flatbed scanner also supports 35mm film in mono and color, as well as 35mm slide positives. The 120/220 medium format isn’t something a lot of other scanners can attest to.

The Epson scanner provides automatic multi-frame scanning with superior results. You can also take advantage of the Digital ICE automatic dust and scratch removal features to produce better film scans across the board.

While it’s true that you’ll get more detail out of other scanners, including those on our list, this Epson flatbed scanner does put up a good fight. It’s a good all-around film scanner to have at your side when you need it.

Magnasonic Super 8/8mm Film Scanner

Pros

  • Supports 3, 5, and 7-inch film reels
  • No computer or editing software required
  • 1080p video resolution
  • Saves up to 120 hours of video

Cons

  • Small screen
  • No film holders included

Check current price

Who needs a video camera when you have the Magnasonic Super 8/8mm scanner? You can save up to 120 hours of video on a 32GB SD card with this versatile scanner that doubles as an old-fashioned 8mm camcorder of sorts.

Plus, the video resolution is 1080p, which is still industry standard (there’s no need for 4K in this instance). You can also adjust a number of features on your scans, from resolution and sharpness to framing and exposure.

This scanner will scan 50 feet of film in around 30 minutes, making it an efficient solution to taking pictures of each film yourself. You can even use the RCA cable to connect to your TV.

The Magnasonic Super 8 scanner supports 3-inch, 5-inch, and 7-inch film reels. You don’t need a computer or editing software either, making this a useful stand-alone product to scan your film.

Epson Perfection V850 Pro scanner

Pros

  • Two sets of film holders
  • 12,800 DPI capable
  • Tons of features
  • 120/220 medium format

Cons

  • Requires computer
  • Some compare the quality to the more affordable Epson V600 model

Check current price

This top-of-the-line film scanner comes with two film holders ready for scanning. While these two film holders can help with 35mm film and slide positives, they can also be useful for the 120/220 medium format film as well.

This Epson scanner will require a computer. However, it does offer 12,800 DPI scanning capabilities that help to produce a better scan overall.

If you’re looking for a quality scanner for your 35mm film, you should definitely check out the Epson Perfection V850 Pro.

It’s definitely an investment, but if you’re serious about getting the best image quality out of your old film photos, it’s worth the money.

Is it Worth Buying a Film Scanner?

Purchasing a film scanner can accomplish a few goals, though there are some downsides to this type of product. For instance, you’ll need to invest in the film scanner up-front, so cost is a factor.

At the same time, purchasing your own film scanner can help you save money. Rather than paying for your scanned images to go through a third-party service, you have total control over your materials.

Depending on the film scanner you choose, you can also pick from various software programs to manipulate your photos and film. Plus, you can keep track of your film and keep it safe from harm or damage.

Film scanners are also easier to use than flatbed scanners in some ways, especially when it comes to scanning film. You will need to invest in a separate device to hold your film down if the scanner you purchased doesn’t come with one.

With that said, film scanners can be expensive. They can cost much more than a few trips to your local photography shop.

These film scanners can also take up a lot of space, depending on which model you choose. And in some ways, a professional photo lab can be more time efficient and offer better end results.  

Can you scan film on any scanner?

Theoretically, you can scan film on any scanner. However, the quality of the results will depend on how well the film is backlit.

Backlighting helps to ensure higher resolutions for more vibrant photos. At the same time, you can also use silver cardstock to achieve the same effect.

Depending on the film scanner, you may be able to manipulate the image quality and edit the film. Adjusting the white balance can help as well.

What kind of scanner do you need to scan film?

If you want to scan film, you’ll need a film negative scanner. This scanner is also called a transparency or slide scanner as well.

The best film scanners use a focused beam of light to capture each photo. In some cases, a built-in motor can move through the negatives automatically to create an image.

Negatives and slides that go through a negative scanner produce good image quality. These scanners are also affordable and easy to use.

For Smartphones: What is the Best Slide Scanner App?

Google PhotoScan is a great app for both Android and iOS users. This free slide scanning app takes a total of 5 images per single image to assemble a final photo that’s free of glaring light sources and shadows.

Photomyne is also another film scanning app you can download on both smartphone platforms. This app includes both free and paid features and links to other Photomyne apps that help you create new memories with prints.

Adobe Scan helps preserve your precious memories with its scanning app, which uses Adobe Sensei to perfect your image quality. The app is free to download but you’ll need an Adobe log-in to access all features.

How to Choose the Best Film Scanners

1. Type of scanner

Flatbed scanners are the most common and affordable type of film scanner. However, they can be slow to scan and produce lower resolutions than other types of scanners.

A dedicated film scanner requires a computer to complete the scanning process. You’ll achieve a higher quality scan with more detail, but that comes with a bigger price tag.

All-in-one film scanners fall between flatbed scanners and dedicated film scanners in terms of price. At the same time, the scan quality of these film scanners isn’t the best.

2. Resolution

You will want to purchase a film scanner with at least 3,000 DPI to achieve a high-quality image. The resolution relies on pixels to produce excellent results.

In most cases, you’ll be paying more for resolution than any other features of the scanner. Two scanners might be priced similarly, but if one offers a better resolution than the other, chances are it will be a better scanner overall.

3. Dynamic range

A film scanner’s dynamic range is the product’s ability to achieve optical density. Dynamic range is measured from 0 to 4, with 4 being the best.

The best film scanners feature a dynamic range between 3 and 4. The higher the range on the slide digitizer, the more vibrant your photo.

4. Software

Digital photos require software in order to turn physical photographic materials into images in digital format. This software might only allow you to manipulate your photos during the scanning process, or it can give you the option of editing and storing them as well.

The best film scanner comes with intuitive software that makes processes easy and simple. This includes a screen within the film scanner or a way to connect to a computer or TV.

5. Ease of use

The best film scanner is easy to use and produces high scan quality results. Some might include premium features, but those should be easy to use as well so you can start scanning immediately.

An easy-to-use film scanner should be as simple as it is capable. Advanced features shouldn’t include a steep learning curve, if any.

  • How to convert slides to digital files

You can feed the slides into a scanner, and it’ll automatically convert the images into digital formats, like JPEG.

Alternatively, you can get a slide duplicator attachment for a DSLR camera. The duplicator will position the slide in front of the lens so you can take the picture, which will then be saved as a digital file in the camera’s memory.

Choosing a Flatbed Scanner for Film | Final Words

Scanning your own film can be fun with the best slide and negative scanner. We certainly had a lot of fun testing the products in this list.

It may be a little fiddly to set things up initially, but the satisfaction of making your analog memories into digitals is hard to put in words!

We hope you’ve found this article on the best slide scanners in 2023 will help you make the memories of your past come back to life.  

Editor’s Choice

Plustek 8200i

Fast, high quality and simple to use way to scan color and mono negatives, as well as 35mm slide positives.

Check Current Price

TOP 9 models for scanning negatives

Scanner for digitizing film: TOP 9 models for scanning negatives

Rank

The rating will introduce you to advanced film scanners. In the review – the favorites of the market, their characteristics and functionality. We will show you how to find the best device for you.

Author: Dmitry Kuzmin

Update: May 2023

Budget price segment

1

ESPADA QPix MDFC 1400

3

Lowmo 22 Mp

Middle price segment

1

Epson Perfection V19

2

Plustek 8100

3

Canon CanoScan LiDE 400

High end

1

Plustek OpticFilm 8200i SE

2

Plustek 8200i SE

3

Plustek OpticSlim 2610

taking when evaluating products and services. Our goal is to make it easy for you to buy the right product from a variety of retailers.

Surely you would like to keep the priceless shots captured on outdated film. Without them, you can’t make a full-fledged family archive. In addition, pictures printed on old photographic paper fade with time, the image cracks, and in some places wears out.

How do you preserve your precious documentary material? By transferring the negative film to digital media. To do this, you can contact a photo lab, but it is better to purchase your own scanner for digitizing film, especially if you have a large scope of work in this regard.

We will tell you all about choosing a device for scanning fragile and transparent negatives. Our rating lists the best models that can not only digitize film and slides, but also improve their quality. Among the presented devices there are products of different prices.

Winners in their categories:

Epson Perfection V19

Best

The Epson Perfection V19 Film Scanner is the perfect solution for recovering old, important photos. Due to its low cost, this scanner is available to a wide audience

Product Overview

Lowmo 22 Mp

Cheapest

The Lowmo 22 Mp Film Scanner is an innovative device that provides everything you need to capture your film quality

Product Overview

9000 2 Plustek OpticSlim 2610

Most functional

Quick and easy tool for digitizing film up to 35 mm.

Product Overview

Best Film Scanner Ranking

Location

Product

Rating

Sensor type

Maximum resolution

Type

Product overview

Budget price segment

#1

ESPADA QPix MDFC 1400

95

/ 100

CMOS

9600×9600 dpi

slide scanner

More details

#3

Lowmo 22 Mp

91

/ 100

90 002 CMOS

3600×3600dpi

slide scanner

More

Mid-range

#1

Epson Perfection V19

97

/ 100

C CD

4800×4800 dpi

flatbed scanner

More details

#2

Plustek 8100

96

/ 100

CCD

7200×7200 dpi 90 003

slide scanner

More details

#3

Canon CanoScan LiDE 400

95

/ 100

CMOS

4800×4800 dpi

slide scanner

More details

High end

#1 900 03

Plustek OpticFilm 8200i SE

96

/ 100

CCD

7200 ×7200 dpi

slide scanner

More details

#2

Plustek 8200i SE

96

/ 100

CCD 90 003

7200×7200 dpi

slide scanner

More details

#3

PLUSTEK OPTICSLIM 2610

95

/100

CCD

7200 × 7200dpi

Tables. scanner

More details

#1

ESPADA QPix MDFC 1400

#3

Lowmo 22 Mp

#1

Epson Perfection V19 9 0003

#2

Plustek 8100

#3

Canon CanoScan LiDE 400

#1

Plustek OpticFilm 8200i SE

#2

Plustek 8200i SE

#3

Plustek OpticSlim 2610

Budget

#1

ESPADA QPix MDFC 1400

Scanner designed to digitize film with high image quality and accuracy

Expert rating:

95

/ 100

This is the ideal choice for photography enthusiasts or professionals who want to store their collection electronically. Unlike many other film scanners, this unit is equipped with automatic color correction, which allows you to get the most accurate image without loss of quality

The scanner has a wide range of supported formats and high scanning speed. Thanks to this, the user does not have to spend a lot of time processing documents, and he can quickly get high-quality photos.

  • Resolution: Optical – 3600 DPI, software – up to 9600 DPI
  • File formats: PDF, JPEG, BMP, TIFF, PCX, PNG, TGA
  • Scan speed: up to 120 sheets per minute
  • Interfaces: USB 2.0
  • An ideal choice for those who want to save their photos digitally without losing quality. Thanks to automatic color correction, you get the most accurate image, and a wide range of supported formats allows you to process various types of film

    Pros

    • Automatic color correction for image accuracy
    • High scan resolution up to 9600 DPI
    • Wide range of supported file formats
    • High scanning speed up to 120 sheets per minute
    • Double-sided scanning to save paper

    Disadvantages

    • It is quite large, so it is not very suitable for use in offices or homes with limited space
    • The USB 2.0 interface, although fast, is already outdated and does not transfer data at the speeds available on today’s hardware

    #3

    Lowmo 22 Mp

    Cheapest

    Lowmo 22 Mp Film Scanner is an innovative device that is everything you need to capture your film quality

    Expert Rating:

    91

    / 100

    Moreover, this scanner not only scans film easily and quickly , but also delivers high-quality 22-megapixel scanning for crisp, detailed images. Image buffering allows you to instantly display them on the screen for quick viewing

    Unlike many other scanners, it has the ability to display scanned images on a large screen thanks to the built-in HDMI port. You can also save scanned images to an SD card or send directly to a USB flash drive or computer without any extra steps

    Specifications:

    • Supported film size 35 mm
    • Integrated 2.4″ LCD color display
    • HDMI and USB ports
    • Storage on SD card
    • Built-in image editor for adjusting brightness, contrast and color balance

    This scanner is for anyone who wants to capture their memories and documents digitally on film. It is ideal for both home and professional use to preserve photo copies, detail, brightness and color

    Pros

    • High scan resolution
    • Ease of use
    • Built-in image editor
    • HDMI port for viewing images on a large screen
    • Ability to save scanned images to SD card

    Disadvantages

    • Can only be used with 35 mm film

    Mid-range

    #1

    Epson Perfection V19

    90 002 Best

    Epson Perfection V19 Film Scanneris the perfect solution for restoring old, important photos. Due to its low cost, this scanner is available to a wide audience

    Expert rating:

    97

    / 100

    This is a unique device that outperforms its competitors in many aspects. Among the main advantages are high speed, the ability to scan documents in color and monochrome, and ease of use. The scanner has a resolution of up to 4800×4800 dpi, which allows you to get very clear and detailed images. This is the perfect solution for restoring old photos that have lost their original look.

    Thanks to Epson Easy Photo Fix technology, you can quickly and easily correct color gamut, run an image through automatic color and brightness correction, remove scratches and even smooth out uneven film

    Specifications:

    • Scan Resolution 48 00×4800 dpi
    • Built-in optical density 48 bit
    • Scans 35 mm film, transparencies and negatives
    • Scanned area size 216×297 mm
    • Connects to a computer via USB 2. 0 port

    Who will use the Epson Perfection V19: This model is suitable for people who want to digitize their old photos and documents with high quality. It is easy to use and fast

    Advantages

    • High quality scanning and multi-format film scanning
    • Quick and easy to use
    • Built-in Epson Easy Photo Fix 9 option0290

    • Good value for money

    Cons

    • No autofeed

    #2

    Plustek 8100

    Desktop Slide Scanner Six Frames Simultaneously

    Expert Rating:

    96

    / 100

    The Plustek OpticFilm 8100 resolution delivers the most accurate color reproduction with detailed midtones. The owner of the device has the opportunity to change the color, improve the characteristics of resolution, lighting. Digitized materials are stored on a computer or on a separate hard drive.

    Rich Silver Fast software is included with the product. The model’s dynamic capabilities are enhanced by Multi-Exposure®. The NegaFix function guarantees the highest possible scan result.

    Specifications:

    • Instrument – slide scanner;
    • Digitization format – PDF, JPEG, JPG;
    • Scanning element – CCD;
    • Resolution – 7200×7200 dpi;
    • Pairing methods – USB, SD slot;
    • Size – 120×119×272 mm;
    • Device weight – 1.6 kg.

    For ease of processing, a frame for six frames is included with the device. The frame preview mode from the computer monitor helps to accurately make adjustments to the image and monitor the result of the changes before activating digitizing. The file format for storage is selected based on the personal preferences of the owner.

    Pros

    • Excellent resolution
    • Improving Image Quality
    • Color correction
    • Rich software
    • Complete set with frame for six frames

    Disadvantages

    • No screen for viewing frames
    • Poor quality retouching
    • Slow Digitization Speed ​​

    #3

    Canon CanoScan LiDE 400

    The ideal scanner for digitizing film in various formats. It is easy to use and has high image quality

    Expert rating:

    95

    / 100

    The scanner allows you to easily and accurately digitize photos and documents. It has the added feature of scanning various formats of film including 35mm film

    One of the highlights of this scanner is its ease of use. With the Auto Scan Mode button, users can quickly and easily start the scanning process without having to adjust settings. What’s more, the scanner has a compact design and can be stored vertically, saving desk space

    The scanner has a high scan quality. The scanning resolution is 4800×4800 dpi, which allows you to get very clear and detailed images. The scanner has built-in scan optimization that automatically improves image quality.

    The scanner also has the ability to scan plastic cards, paper documents, and books. It connects to a computer via a USB port and can be used on Windows and Mac operating systems

    Specifications:

    • Scan resolution 4800×4800 dpi
    • Scanned area size 216×297 mm
    • Connects to PC via USB port
    • 35 mm film scanning function

    Ideal for anyone who wants to conveniently and efficiently digitize their photos in various formats. It makes it easy to keep memories for years to come

    Benefits

    • Easy to use and compact design
    • High scan quality
    • 35 mm film scanning function
    • Built-in scan optimization

    Disadvantages

    • No duplex scanning
    • No automatic document feeder

    High end

    #1

    Plustek OpticFilm 8200i SE

    The

    is the ideal solution for digitizing film with superior image quality and professional color correction settings

    Expert rating:

    96

    / 100

    Plustek OpticFilm 8200i SE is a high performance and professional scanner for digitizing photographic film in various formats. It has a scanning resolution of up to 7200 dpi and 48-bit color depth to preserve every nuance in images.

    The scanner stands out from the competition due to its high color accuracy. It has the option of adjusting the color balance, adjusting the contrast and brightness. So users can achieve professional results when digitizing film

    The scanner is also fast and can scan a variety of film formats including 35mm, 120mm and 4×5 inch film. It also features infrared cleaning technology that removes dust and scratches from film

    Specifications:

    • 7200 dpi scan resolution
    • 48-bit color depth
    • Connects to PC via USB port
    • 35 mm, 120 mm, 4×5 inch film scan function

    Plustek OpticFilm 8200i SE is for those who are looking for a professional film digitizing scanner with color balance adjustment and image retention

    Pros

    • High scan resolution
    • Professional Color Balance Adjustment
    • Infrared cleaning technology
    • Support for various film formats

    Disadvantages

    • Significant weight and size, which makes it difficult to transport and store

    #2

    Plustek 8200i SE

    Innovative slide scanner with advanced software

    Expert rating:

    96

    / 100

    Designed for professional photographers and designers. However, it is also suitable for enthusiastic photography enthusiasts who want to achieve the highest quality film scanning. The maximum resolution of the instrument for digitizing slides and film is 7200 dots distributed per inch.

    With just one touch of a button, you can change the color scheme. WorkflowPilot virtual assistant provides a preview of each step of retouching, adjustment, digitizing. In order to obtain an impeccable result, many different settings are used.

    Specifications:

    • Instrument – slide scanner;
    • Digitization format – JPEG;
    • Scanning element – CCD;
    • Resolution – 3600×3600 dpi, improved 7200×7200 dpi;
    • Pairing methods – USB, SD slot;
    • Size – 120×119×272 mm;
    • Device weight – 1.6 kg.

    Scanning a frame or transparencies takes only 8 seconds, which is impressive compared to the above devices. For flawless digitizing, the instrument is equipped with the revolutionary Silver Fast software. Improved functionality allows you to remove minor noise and serious flaws from the source.

    Advantages

    • Excellent resolution
    • Superb Digitizing Speed ​​
    • Image quality enhancement
    • Sharpness and color correction
    • Innovative software

    Disadvantages

    • High price
    • Too bulky software
    • No auto film feed
    • Poor design of frame holders
    • Need to cut film into 6 shots

    #3

    Plustek OpticSlim 2610

    Most Functional

    Quick and easy tool to digitize film up to 35mm

    Expert Rating:

    95

    / 100

    Plustek OpticSlim 2610 Scanner – Scanner provides high quality scanning of 35mm film. With it, users can save valuable photo albums, archival films and negatives on a computer or in the cloud without losing quality.

    One of the main advantages of this model is the scanning speed – only 3. 6 seconds per frame. This makes it possible to process a large number of films in a short time. In addition, it allows you to save scanned images in various formats, including JPEG and TIFF

    The scanner has a flexible resolution setting that can reach up to 7200 dpi. The model also provides various color modes: Monochrome, 24-bit and 48-bit, which provides the best image quality

    One of the features of the scanner is the presence of a color correction function – this allows you to scan photographic films with high accuracy, which is especially important for preserving old photos and family archives

    Specifications:

    • inch
    • Output file format: JPEG and TIFF
    • Color modes: Monochrome, 24-bit and 48-bit
    • Scan speed: 3.6 seconds per frame
    • Film sizes supported: 35 mm format

    Ideal for those who want to keep their old photos and archives on their computer or in the cloud. It is also suitable for professionals who work with client archives and need to maintain image quality

    Pros

    • Fast scanning process
    • Flexible resolution setting
    • Minimizing color distortion when scanning

    Disadvantages

    • Doesn’t support other film sizes

    Selecting a film scanner

    We can’t say that the range of scanners for transparencies and negatives printed on a transparent base is not too wide. However, it should be understood before paying for the purchase. After all, even budget models cost a lot.

    To correctly select a scanner for converting photographic films into digital format, you first need to decide on the scope of work.

    If there is not much material to digitize, a device that processes one frame is quite suitable. If the volume of the archive is solid, you will need devices that can scan multiple images.

    Film scanner – a device that allows you to convert frames and slides that are significant to you into digital format and store them in a computer archive .

    #1. Design differences of scanners

    According to the design features, film scanners used in the home are divided into two varieties:

    1. Slide scanners . Devices, in the working area of ​​which only frames on transparent media can be brought – one or more negatives, transparencies slides.
    2. Tablet devices . Units made in the form of conventional tablets. They can scan not only frames on a transparent film, but also already printed photographs.

    For digitizing, all types of devices are supplied with lamps that illuminate the material from below a kind of light table of the scanner. Almost all models are now equipped with LED lamps, which quickly heat up the work surface and save energy. On top is a photocell.

    The footage is transferred to an A/D converter. After digitization, everything accumulates depending on the complexity and price of the model. It is stored on an SD card, flash drive or in the device’s memory.

    All models translate digitization into files stored in computer folders. Most create JPEG files. But there are models that work with PDF, JPEG, JPG.

    The scanned material is converted into files with a suitable storage extension. They are transferred to a folder created on the desktop or to an online cloud album.

    Equipment with a higher functional level is able to transfer scanned frames to cloud sites. They can be sent to any device on the local or global network. There are those that transmit data without connecting to computer devices.

    #2. Type of scanning element

    The main scanning element is a sensor responsible for the quality of image reading. It is also a photo sensor or matrix. The element converts the image imprinted on the film into an electrical signal.

    Film scanners use two types of photo sensors:

    1. CMOS . A miniature digital device based on a silicon crystal. In its design, amplifiers are grouped that work with each pixel. They convert charge into voltage.
    2. CCD . An analog sensor with a photosensitive structure. When light hits, it accumulates a beam of electrons that are converted into voltage. Due to the minimum of intermediate strokes, this sensor has a high sensitivity.

    CMOS has lower color and picture clarity than CCD. However, they are cheaper and more economical in use.

    Optimized versions of the digital sensor, made in mega-pixel versions, are much more sensitive, despite the complexity and length of intermediate transitions.

    CCD sensors are simpler in design but require additional electronics to perform scanning. Because devices with such a sensor are more expensive. But they have less noise, the image is clearer, the pixel characteristics are more uniform.

    The sensor reads the processed material, converts it into an electrical signal and transports it to files. If necessary, the device removes defects from the film

    In any case, the quality of scanning cannot but affect the cost of the device. The more expensive it is, the better the result of digitization will be.

    But not everyone needs professional equipment, sometimes you should think: maybe it’s cheaper to take it to a darkroom than to buy super-expensive equipment for a one-time operation?

    #3. Scanner resolution

    This is a characteristic that “says” how many pixels per inch during digitization. It is clear that the more these points, the more expressive and reliable the frame will turn out. At the same time, the price of the scanner also increases.

    In addition to the normal resolution, the improved resolution should also be taken into account. To achieve it, interpolation technology is used. In this case, to obtain a clearer image, pixels are added to the gaps between the dots applied at normal resolution.

    It is convenient if the scanner is equipped with its own screen to review frames before digitizing. This way you can quickly notice imperfections in order to interpolate the resolution if necessary and remove noise.

    The color and intensity of additional pixels are selected from the average values ​​between two adjacent points. As a result, the expressiveness of the image increases, sharp transitions are smoothed out. Halftones are added, favorably shading the details of the picture.

    #4. Digitization speed

    Getting a digitized copy by scanners with CCD sensors is faster, because the way to convert charge into voltage is shorter. The CMOS sensor is slower. But note that in any case it is a few seconds.

    It is also worth remembering that a scanning device purchased for home consumption does not involve mass production.

    The second important circumstance that affects the scanning speed is the resolution. It will take more time to digitize materials with more accurate transmission. After all, you need to transfer to a digital copy every point of the original.

    All types of scanners digitize fairly quickly. If the device is bought for personal consumption, the difference of five or ten seconds does not matter

    #5.

    Size and weight of the instrument

    Weight and size matter if you plan to take the film scanner with you when you travel. Now more and more people want to capture landscapes on tourist trips and employees at conferences using analog technology. The film apparatus will ensure their digitization.

    It’s great if a film scanner purchased for this purpose can transfer data directly to a cloud file. Then you can shoot as much as you want. If not, then you need to take photographic equipment with an impressive memory.

    Desktop scanner needs weight for stability as a light device can be accidentally shifted during operation and ruin the frame.

    Conclusions on the topic

    Purchasing your own film scanner must be carefully considered. It is worth deciding in advance whether you need an expensive device for the sake of digitizing 1-3 coils with frames. It is possible that the services of the photo lab staff will be more profitable, and experienced hands will make everything neater and more beautiful.

    But if you decide to purchase in order to convert newly taken amateur photos into digital space, decide in advance on the type of device. Think about what permission will be enough for you. Check out other important features as well.

    A device that meets your requirements to a greater or lesser extent can be found on sale. It happens that not all parameters of the device suit you. Then pay attention to the scanner, in which the predominant part of the possibilities meets your needs.

    If you have already bought a film scanner, please share your choice with our site visitors. Please leave comments in the block below. Ask questions, mark controversial points in the article, publish photos on the topic.

    Budget price segment

    1

    ESPADA QPix MDFC 1400

    3

    Lowmo 22 Mp

    Mid price segment

    1

    Epson Perfection V19

    2

    Plustek 8100

    3

    Canon CanoScan LiDE 400

    High end

    1

    Plustek OpticFilm 8200i SE

    2

    Plustek 8200i SE

    3

    9000 2 Plustek Optic Slim 2610

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    19 comments

    How I digitized films, and not only But to my surprise, when I was busy putting photo albums in order on the New Year’s weekend, I noticed with interest that I was not the only one who decided to devote holiday time to this useful business.

    Relevant article on the topic “The experience of creating a catalog and indexing a family photo archive. Indexing and digitizing photographic films” was also on Habré. A little later, another article “Metadata for organizing the storage of a photo archive” appeared. Therefore, I decided to share some kind of no experience, maybe bit by bit someone will come in handy.

    In general, the idea to scan and organize old photographs, of course, has been hatched for a long time, it is not easy to decide on such a volume of work on scanning old photographic films (more than a hundred) and photographs (thousands). In general, since childhood, I wanted to have digitized old photographs of my great-great-grandparents, and finally, after 20 years, I decided to move on to this business.

    Scanner

    The first thing was the question – of course the scanner. At one time, about 7 years ago, I tried to digitize negatives and decided to stock up on a film scanner. There was not much money, I chose something cheaper, it turned out to be Miktotek Filmscan 35.

    Compared to scanning monsters, it cost a penny, but the result was awesome. I used Silverfast for it as the most advanced software at the time (maybe now). I don’t know why, but sometimes, with different passes, this miracle gave me either a blue or a green photo, then everything hung up, it was unpredictable and very sad, I had to pore over each frame for 10-15 minutes, straightening the histograms and performing other dances with tambourine. In general, this process discouraged me from scanning films for several years, the scanner is lying around somewhere.

    Now, having considered all the pros and cons, the following has been decided.
    There were several points that had to be taken into account:

    • for the most part I will not scan, but my parents, since they have time now
    • you need to scan not only films, but also photos
    • need to scan a lot
    • no fabulous budget

    In addition to all of the above, I understood that now the film is no longer an actual carrier, and therefore most likely it will be necessary to scan only once, though it may take a long time.

    So film scanners are gone for two reasons:
    firstly, previous experience has shown that you can’t buy such a normal unit for cheap, but what’s cheap – oh, I can’t stand such a hell for the second time.
    Secondly, buying a separate scanner for photos and separately for film is also somehow expensive and impractical.
    Moreover, I said to myself, if something good comes across, I’ll take it to a professional laboratory, you can go broke for a dozen shots.

    Having looked at what is on sale from what can scan film in addition to paper, it turned out that the choice is small: either sky-high prices, or just a couple of options. Break all the shops operating immediately after the holiday, it turned out that there are the following acceptable options:

    • Epson Perfection V330 Photo (A4, 4800 x 9600 dpi, USB 2.0, CCD, Film Adapter)
    • Epson Perfection V370, Photo (A4, 4800×9600 dpi, CCD, USB 2.0)
    • Canon CanoScan LiDE 700F (A4 9600x9600dpi 48bit CIS USB2. 0 Slide Adapter)
    • Canon CanoScan 5600F (A4 4800x9600dpi 48bit USB2.0 Slide Adapter)

    The rest was either too expensive, from 10,000, or, on the contrary, nothing was skillful. Unfortunately, the CanoScan 5600F is no longer available for sale, although the description is very good. The rest turned out to be, according to reviews, about the same, but the decisive role was played by the fact that there were drivers for Linux for Epson, and since I would like to work not only under Windows, Epson Perfection V330 Photo eventually won. Nowhere could I find out how the 330 model differs from the 370, but since the Linux drivers were mentioned only for the 330, I settled on it, so to speak, “to avoid”.

    Drivers are available from the AVASYS website.

    Unfortunately, I haven’t had time to try under Linux yet, but in the Windows software I liked the function of removing defects – it works with a bang on old black-and-white photographs. But you also have to be careful with it – sometimes it can count something worthwhile for a defect.

    Scanner reviews mention in places an issue with banding when scanning films, but I haven’t seen this yet. Nevertheless, in my opinion, here is something useful about this, found in one of the reviews on the Yandex market: “Two years later, I can report on the outcome of the investigation: there is a calibration window in the scanner frame where the white balance is set. If dust particles get there, “broken pixels” are obtained, which, when the carriage is run, give stripes. This is most likely a design defect of the new LED backlight (but who will admit it…). So gentlemen, if you have such a scanner,
    remove the dust.”

    With what resolution to scan – this question was not the last. The scanner gives out a maximum of 4800×9600, but when I tried to set this when scanning a 9x13cm photo, the system began to swear at the scale, I had to reduce it.

    The criterion for choosing a resolution is simple: if we assume that you can print with a standard resolution of 300dpi, then to get the same image, you need to have at least 300dpi. Considering that the photos are old, there is no point in overestimating this figure – anyway, physical resolution will not allow you to get quality out of nothing. Again, it is unlikely that anyone will ever want to print a poster with the image of a great-grandfather on A1 or even A4 format. If someone writes a book, it is unlikely that there will be a picture larger than on a sheet. In general, I decided that for the very old, a two-fold excess would do, for better and later ones, a three-fold excess, i.e. 600dpi and 900dpi respectively. Then I chose what was closest to what the software produced, which came with the scanner.

    I decided to use the maximum for negatives – it was not in vain that I bought with such a resolution … Most likely this is a bust of 4800x4800dpi, but you can always cut it down later, but the main thing is that later you don’t have to rescan with other parameters and you can sleep peacefully.

    Scans are saved, of course, by no means in jpeg, in order to avoid compression losses. Everything is just tiff. It seems, of course, that the place eats more, but then scan it once – and then you don’t know the problems: I do what I want. I didn’t come to this right away either, but practice shows that if I save now, I’ll regret it later and return to this issue, but if everything is to the maximum, then there’s nothing to regret later.

    Cataloging

    Naturally, after digitization it is necessary to sort out the whole thing somehow. The main task was to sign great-great-relatives, because I wanted to preserve the history of the family for the future, and without competent comments, no one will ever figure it out.

    The option to immediately process the photos and put them on the site was not suitable for two reasons: firstly, you need to process everything at once, and this is the time, and the parents do not understand anything about it; secondly, technologies are changing, and who would know how a site will look like in a couple of decades, if at all it will somehow exist.

    The use of a smart cataloging program was not suitable for the same essential reason – there is no guarantee that in a few decades this software will be alive and, accordingly, no one will understand what, where and how is stored in its smart unique format.

    The decision came to mind to store the description in a regular text file with the same name as the photo – it is text and text in Africa, anyone will probably be able to read decades later, even if they come up with some other super-unicode, it’s still much more reliable than special software. But as a programmer, I looked at this option with horror – well, it’s ugly and that’s it. Yes, and uncomfortable in the process.

    Parents said that they generally want it to be like in a Word – here is a photo, here is a signature – and everything is clear. From such a proposal, the hair stood on end, because again – today there is a Word – tomorrow it is not.

    Another option is to store signatures in EXIF. Here it was embarrassing that when processing pictures, many EXIF ​​softwares are simply ignored, as a result, losing precious signatures can be irreplaceable.

    In general, after analyzing the whole situation, I made a decision: we scan the photo, sign it as EXIF, and then we make all these pictures with signatures read-only, so that there is no temptation to change anything, and thus we guarantee the safety of information. If you want to change – make a copy – and go ahead. Well, backups of course. And in general, in the end, we are programmers, in order to sketch a small script so that the entire EXIF ​​can be exported to a text file just in case, “to avoid” 🙂

    There are a lot of command line tools for working with EXIF ​​in Linux, but this is unacceptable for convenient work with a large number of pictures. However, here’s what it is: exif , exiftool , exiv2 , googling for more details. Next, I used exiftool for batch processing, but more on that later.

    We look at what is from the GUI. Having studied what the OpenSource community offers us, I somehow settled on DigiKam – “digiKam is an advanced digital photo management application for Linux, Windows, and Mac-OSX”, as they say on their website.
    I decided to edit in GIMP, GNU Image Manipulation Program, similar to Photoshop, but opensource. Therefore, the ability to edit photos for the cataloging software was not required separately, but in the cataloging itself, several things were bribed.

    First, DigiKam edits EXIF, which is what I want.

    Secondly, all the photos are on the screen at once, we sign them in the box next to them and immediately move on to the next one – quickly, simply and conveniently.

    Thirdly, it was noticed that EXIF ​​itself has several similar tags for commenting: Comment , UserComment , ImageComment , well, DigiKam writes to everything at once, so the probability that other software will read this information is quite high.

    In addition, reading the reviews, I was pleased with the idea that, in addition to just EXIF, the softinka can keep a catalog, and not copying anything anywhere, unlike many others, but simply processing everything on the spot. This was a huge plus – I did not look for this opportunity initially, but it turned out to be very useful. And what I liked is that in addition to entering information into EXIF, she writes it to her database and then it is convenient to sort and search for photos by tags, tags, descriptions, etc. And even if at some point the software disappears and the database also disappears, then a copy of the data will remain in EXIF, which, in fact, is what I need.

    Some interesting thoughts on cataloging are described in the already mentioned article “The experience of creating a catalog and indexing a family photo archive. Indexing and digitizing photographic films. So, all or almost all of this data can also be stored in EXIF ​​and, if necessary, exported to any format, as it will be convenient for us.
    An additional advantage of DigiKam is that you can choose any photo as the album cover, and I liked the idea of ​​having a photo of the paper album itself as the cover, for which I thank the author.

    Another non-obvious moment that I encountered when working with DigiKam: if there are no rights to write to a photo file, then the software silently writes only to its database, without making it clear that there are problems. For a long time I tried to figure out why there is a signature in the program, but not in the file, especially since the “save in file” option is set in the settings. So, keep this in mind – check the access rights, otherwise you can swear for a long time.

    Posted on the site

    So, the main tasks are solved – scanning and cataloging. Now it’s time to brag to relatives, show friends a photo. Naturally, by posting photos on the site. Not so long ago, I already made a soft for this case: I folded the necessary photos into
    catalog, launched – and you’re done, the album has become. I wrote about this on Habré last time, “Simple automation: photo album”. Now, using DigiKam, I decided that right in the EXIF ​​tags you can mark a photo, whether it should be placed in a photo album or not, because when scanning there were all sorts of pictures that should not be posted on the site. Yes, and comments can now be taken from EXIF.

    Everything seems to be fine, but not very good.

    Everything on the site is handled in PHP, and there is what I thought was a great function for working with EXIF, read_exif_data() , but as practice has shown, this underfunction shows only part of the data, absolutely silent about the rest. I rummaged through everything I could – and the dream of an easy life sank into oblivion, I had to pull EXIF ​​out of files at the stage of album generation, since command line tools have a place to be.

    As a result, he rewrote the script, remembering the sarcastic comment to his previous article “Perl php-file generator… Monsieur knows a lot…”, laughed to himself that he was still right that he did not fully rely on PHP — here it is for me I would have put my foot up now, and so a couple of minutes – and the problem is solved.

    So, when processing a photo in DigiKam, we mark the photo with a flag (it is called PickLabel there).