Usb cable type b: Amazon Basics USB-A to USB-B 2.0 Cable for Printer or External Hard Drive, Gold-Plated Connectors, 10 Foot, Black

What Is USB? USB, Micro and Mini USB | Connector Guide

What are USB connectors?

Universal Serial Bus (USB) was developed in the 1990s in an effort to simplify the connections between computers and peripheral devices. It has become widely popular due to its compatibility with many platforms and operating systems, its low cost of implementation, and its ease of use. Most computers that are built today come with several USB ports, and USB is the interface of choice for most home and office peripherals including printers, cameras, modems, and portable storage devices. 

Select the USB connector that you want to learn more about:

USB 3.0 A

USB 3.0 B

USB Micro-A

USB Micro-B

USB Mini-B (5-Pin)

USB Mini-B (4-Pin)

USB 3.0 Micro B

USB-C Info

Shop Popular USB-C Products

USB-C Images


The USB-C or USB Type-C connector has several advanced features
  • The reversible/symmetrical design is 60% smaller than USB-A.
  • Symmetrical connectors that can be inserted either way, right side up or upside down.
  • Tested with up to 10,000 connection cycles and is 6 times more durable than USB-A.
  • USB-C can carry USB 4, Thunderbolt 4, Thunderbolt 3, USB 3.2, USB 3.1, USB 3.0, USB 2.0, and USB 1.1 signals.
  • USB-C 3.2 can carry up to 100W, enough power to support mobile device charging.
  • Native DisplayPort video and four channel audio supports computer monitors, HDTVs, surround sound systems, and headphones.
  • Transfer rates up to 40Gbits/s make USB 4 and Thunderbolt 4 ideal solutions for transferring large amounts of data, such as HD video for editing, Blu-ray™ authoring, or high resolution photos for editing or storage.

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3ft (0.9m) USB-C to C 3.1 (Gen 1) Male to Female Extension Cable (5Gbps)

28656 | C2G

Extend the distance of a USB-C connection

$17. 99

6ft (1.8m) USB-C to DisplayPort™ Adapter Cable 4K 30Hz – Black

26902 | C2G

Connect a USB-C computer directly to the DisplayPort input of a projector or display to transmit video and audio

$36.99

6ft (1.8m) USB-C 2.0 Male to Male Cable (3A)

28826 | C2G

Connect any two standard USB-C enabled devices to simultaneously charge and transfer data.

$11.99

3ft (0.9m) USB-C to C 3.1 (Gen 2) Male to Female Extension Cable (10Gbps)

28658 | C2G

Extend the distance of a USB-C connection

$19.99

10ft (3m) USB 3.0 (USB 3.1 Gen 1) USB-C to USB-B Cable M/M – Black

28867 | C2G

Connect a USB-B device to a USB Type-C port on a laptop, desktop computer, tablet, or other device.

$19.99

1ft (0. 3m) USB-C to DisplayPort™ Adapter Cable 4K 30Hz – Black

26899 | C2G

Connect a USB-C computer directly to the DisplayPort input of a projector or display to transmit video and audio

$27.19

$31.99

6ft (1.8m) USB 2.0 USB-C to USB-B Cable M/M – Black

28859 | C2G

Connect a USB-B device to a USB Type-C port on a laptop, desktop computer, tablet, or other device.

$12.99

6ft (1.8m) USB-C® to USB-A SuperSpeed USB 5Gbps Cable M/M – Black

28832 | C2G

Power, charge, and transfer data to and from any standard USB-C device and a USB-A device or accessory.

$15.99

3ft (0.9m) USB 3.0 (USB 3.1 Gen 1) USB-C to USB-B Cable M/M – Black

28865 | C2G

Connect a USB-B device to a USB Type-C port on a laptop, desktop computer, tablet, or other device.

$11. 99

10ft (3m) USB-C® to USB-A SuperSpeed USB 5Gbps Cable M/M – Black

28833 | C2G

Power, charge, and transfer data to and from any standard USB-C device and a USB-A device or accessory.

$18.99

USB-C Male Iso

USB-C Male Front

USB-C Male Top

USB 3.0 A Info

Shop Popular USB 3.0 A Products


Known as “SuperSpeed”, this A-style connector is commonly found on host controllers in computers and hubs, the A-style connector is a flat, rectangular interface. This interface holds the connection in place by friction which makes it very easy for users to connect and disconnect. Instead of round pins, the connector uses flat contacts which can withstand continuous attachment and removal very well. The A-socket connector provides a “downstream” connection that is intended for use solely on host controllers and hubs. This connector is similar in size and shape to the A-Type connector used in USB 2.

0 & USB 1.1 applications. However, the USB 3.0 A-type has additional pins that are not found in the USB 2.0 & USB 1.1 A-Type. The USB 3.0 connector is designed for USB SuperSpeed applications; however, it will carry data from slower speed connections, and it is backwards compatible with USB 2.0 ports. USB 3.0 A connectors are often blue in color to help identify them from previous versions.

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3.3ft (1m) USB 3.0 A Male to A Male Cable

54170 | C2G

Compliant to USB 3.0 SuperSpeed specifications; extend your USB 3.0 connection!

$6.99

6.6ft (2m) USB 3.0 A Male to A Male Cable

54171 | C2G

Compliant to USB 3.0 SuperSpeed specifications

$8.99

9.8ft (3m) USB 3.0 A Male to B Male Cable

54175 | C2G

Compliant to USB 3. 0 SuperSpeed specifications

$10.99

6.6ft (2m) USB 3.0 A Male to B Male Cable

54174 | C2G

Compliant to USB 3.0 SuperSpeed specifications

$8.99

16.4ft (5m) USB 3.0 USB-A Male to USB-A Female Active Extension Cable (TAA Compliant)

39939 | C2G

Extend the useable range of a USB 3.0 device 5 additional meters

$48.99

9.8ft (3m) USB 3.0 A Male to A Male Cable

54172 | C2G

Compliant to USB 3.0 SuperSpeed specifications

$10.99

3.3ft (1m) USB 3.0 A Male to B Male Cable

54173 | C2G

Compliant to USB 3.0 SuperSpeed specifications

$6.99

3.3ft (1m) USB 3.0 A Male to Micro B Male Cable

54176 | C2G

Compliant to USB 3. 0 SuperSpeed specifications

$12.99

6.6ft (2m) USB 3.0 A Male to Micro B Male Cable

54177 | C2G

Compliant to USB 3.0 SuperSpeed specifications

$14.99

9.8ft (3m) USB 3.0 A Male to Micro B Male Cable

54178 | C2G

Compliant to USB 3.0 SuperSpeed specifications

$17.99

USB 3.0 B Info

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The USB 3.0 B connector is found on USB 3.0 devices. This connector is designed to carry data and power in USB SuperSpeed applications. Cables with this connector are not backwards compatible with USB 2.0 or USB 1.1 devices; however USB 3.0 devices with this connection type can accept previous USB 2.0 and 1.1 cabling.

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9.8ft (3m) USB 3. 0 A Male to B Male Cable

54175 | C2G

Compliant to USB 3.0 SuperSpeed specifications

$10.99

6.6ft (2m) USB 3.0 A Male to B Male Cable

54174 | C2G

Compliant to USB 3.0 SuperSpeed specifications

$8.99

3.3ft (1m) USB 3.0 A Male to B Male Cable

54173 | C2G

Compliant to USB 3.0 SuperSpeed specifications

$6.99

USB-A Info

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USB-A Images


Found on host controllers in computers, hubs, and other charging or syncing devices.
  • The USB-A connector is a flat, rectangular interface.
  • The connection is held in place by friction, making it easy for users to connect and disconnect.
  • Instead of round pins, the connector uses flat contacts, which can withstand continuous attachment and removal very well.
  • The A-socket connector provides a “downstream” connection for host controllers and hubs.
  • The A-socket is not intended for use as an “upstream” connector on a peripheral device.
  • The host controller or hub design provides 5V DC power on one of the USB pins.
  • Though not common, A-A cables connect USB devices with an A-style Female port to a PC or another USB device for data transfer between two computer systems.

Note: Typically, an A-A cable is not intended to connect two computers together or to connect a USB hub between two computers. Doing so may cause irreparable damage to your computers and may even present a fire hazard. Check with the manufacturer before using an A-A cable for data transfer.

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16.4ft (5m) USB 2.0 A/B Cable – Black

28104 | C2G

Connect your USB device to the USB port on your USB hub, PC or Mac®

$5. 99

6.6ft (2m) USB 2.0 Right Angle A/B Cable – Black

28110 | C2G

Connect your USB device to the USB port on your USB hub, PC or Mac®

$5.99

16.4ft (5m) USB 2.0 A/B Cable – White

13401 | C2G

Connect your USB device to the USB port on your USB hub, PC or Mac®

$5.99

3.3ft (1m) USB 2.0 A/B Cable – White

13171 | C2G

Connect your USB device to the USB port on your USB hub, PC or Mac®

$3.99

6.6ft (2m) USB 2.0 A/B Cable – Black

28102 | C2G

Connect your USB device to the USB port on your USB hub, PC or Mac®

$3.99

9.8ft (3m) USB 2.0 A/B Cable – White

13400 | C2G

Connect your USB device to the USB port on your USB hub, PC or Mac®

$3. 99

15ft (4.6m) USB 2.0 A to Micro-B Cable M/M – Black (4.6m)

27395 | C2G

Charge or transfer data between a portable Micro-USB device and a USB port on a computer or other USB mobile device

$14.99

16.4ft (5m) Ultima™ USB 2.0 A/B Cable

29144 | C2G

An ultra-premium, high-performance cable to connect your USB device to the USB port on your USB hub, PC or Mac®

$12.99

9.8ft (3m) Ultima™ USB 2.0 A to Mini-B Cable

29652 | C2G

An ultra-premium, high-performance cable to connect your USB Mini-B device to the USB port on your USB hub, PC or Mac®

$7.99

6.6ft (2m) USB 2.0 A Male to A Male Cable – Black

28106 | C2G

Connect USB 2.0 devices with an “A Female” port to your computer or other USB device

$2. 99

USB-A Male Iso

USB-A Male Front

USB-A Male Top

USB-A Female Iso

USB-A Female Front

USB-A Female Top

USB-B Info

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USB-B Images


The B-style connector design is for use with USB peripheral devices, commonly found on printers.
  • The B-style interface is squarish in shape and has slightly beveled corners on the top ends of the connector.
  • Like the USB-A connector, it uses the friction of the connector body to stay in place.
  • The B-socket is an “upstream” connector only used on peripheral devices.

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3.3ft (1m) USB 2.0 A/B Cable – White

13171 | C2G

Connect your USB device to the USB port on your USB hub, PC or Mac®

$3.99

9. 8ft (3m) USB 2.0 A/B Cable – White

13400 | C2G

Connect your USB device to the USB port on your USB hub, PC or Mac®

$3.99

6.6ft (2m) USB 2.0 Right Angle A/B Cable – Black

28110 | C2G

Connect your USB device to the USB port on your USB hub, PC or Mac®

$5.99

6.6ft (2m) Ultima™ USB 2.0 A/B Cable

29141 | C2G

An ultra-premium, high-performance cable to connect your USB device to the USB port on your USB hub, PC or Mac®

$7.99

6ft (1.8m) USB 2.0 One B Male to Two A Male Y-Cable

28108 | C2G

Increase the power running to a portable hard drive from your PC or Mac®

$10.99

39.3ft (12m) USB A/B Active Cable (Center Booster Format) (39.4ft)

38998 | C2G

Connect your USB device an incredible 25 feet away (7. 62m)!

$45.99

25ft (7.6m) USB A/B Active Cable (Center Booster Format)

38989 | C2G

Connect your USB device an incredible 25 feet away (7.62m)!

$43.99

16.4ft (5m) USB 2.0 A/B Cable – White

13401 | C2G

Connect your USB device to the USB port on your USB hub, PC or Mac®

$5.99

16.4ft (5m) Ultima™ USB 2.0 A/B Cable

29144 | C2G

An ultra-premium, high-performance cable to connect your USB device to the USB port on your USB hub, PC or Mac®

$12.99

16.4ft (5m) USB 2.0 A/B Cable – Black

28104 | C2G

Connect your USB device to the USB port on your USB hub, PC or Mac®

$5.99

USB-B Male Iso

USB-B Male Front

USB-B Male Top

USB-B Female Iso

USB-B Female Front

USB-B Female Top

USB Micro-A Info

USB Micro-A Images

USB Micro-A


The USB-IF recognizes this connector on mobile devices such as cell phones, GPS units, and digital cameras.

  • The USB Micro-A connection is physically smaller in size than a USB Mini-B.
  • Supports the transfer rate of 480 Mbps and on-the-go features.
  • The white-colored receptacle and compact 5-pin design make it easy to identify the connection.

USB Micro-A Male Iso

USB Micro-A Male Front

USB Micro-A Male Top

USB Micro-B Info

USB Micro-B Images

USB Micro-B


The USB-IF recognizes this connector on mobile devices such as cell phones, GPS units, and digital cameras.
  • The USB Micro-B connection is physically smaller in size than a USB Mini-B.
  • Supports the transfer rate of 480 Mbps and on-the-go features.
  • The black-colored receptacle and compact 5-pin design make it easy to identify the connection.

USB Micro-B Male Iso

USB Micro-B Male Front

USB Micro-B Male Top

USB Mini-B (5-Pin) Info

Shop Popular USB Mini-B (5-Pin) Products

USB Mini-B (5-Pin) Images


One drawback to the B-style connector is its size, which measures almost a half inch on each side.

This made the B-style interface unsuitable for many compact personal electronic devices. As a result, many device manufacturers began miniaturizing USB connectors with this Mini-B.

  • The USB-IF recognizes this 5-pin USB Mini-B connector.
  • This connector is relatively small, about two-thirds the width of an A-style connector.

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9.8ft (3m) Ultima™ USB 2.0 A to Mini-B Cable

29652 | C2G

An ultra-premium, high-performance cable to connect your USB Mini-B device to the USB port on your USB hub, PC or Mac®

$7.99

6ft (1.8m) USB 2.0 USB-C to USB Mini-B Cable M/M – Black

28855 | C2G

Connect a USB-Mini B device to a USB Type-C port on a laptop, desktop computer, tablet, or other device.

$8.99

6. 6ft (2m) USB 2.0 A to Mini-B Cable

27005 | C2G

Connect your 5-pin mini-USB camera or device to the USB port on your USB hub, PC or Mac®. Works for many camera models from the major brands.

$3.99

3.3ft (1m) USB 2.0 A to Mini-B Cable

27329 | C2G

Connect your 5-pin mini-USB camera or device to the USB port on your USB hub, PC or Mac®. Works for many camera models from the major brands.

$3.99

6.6ft (2m) Ultima™ USB 2.0 A to Mini-B Cable

29651 | C2G

An ultra-premium, high-performance cable to connect your USB Mini-B device to the USB port on your USB hub, PC or Mac®

$6.99

3ft (0.9m) USB 2.0 USB-C to USB Mini-B Cable M/M – Black

28854 | C2G

Connect a USB-Mini B device to a USB Type-C port on a laptop, desktop computer, tablet, or other device.

$9. 99

6.6ft (2m) Ultima™ USB 2.0 A to Mini-B Cable for select Minolta, Samsung® and Toshiba™ Cameras (HIROSE KEY)

12342 | C2G

A high-performance replacement USB cable for select Minolta, Samsung® and Toshiba™ digital cameras

$6.63

$7.99

11in 4-Port USB 2.0 Hub Cable

27402 | C2G

It’s a hub AND it’s a cable! Connect 3 USB 2.0 devices and 1 Mini-b device to your PC with just one cable.

$18.99

6ft (1.8m) USB 2.0 Two A Male to One Mini-B Male Y-Cable

28107 | C2G

Increase the power running to a portable hard drive from your PC or Mac®

$9.99

12ft (3.7m) USB 2.0 USB-C to USB Mini-B Cable M/M – Black

28857 | C2G

Connect a USB-Mini B device to a USB Type-C port on a laptop, desktop computer, tablet, or other device.

$21.99

USB Mini-B (5-Pin) Male Iso

USB Mini-B (5-Pin) Male Front

USB Mini-B (5-Pin) Male Top

USB Mini-B (4-Pin) Info

Shop Popular USB Mini-B (4-Pin) Products

USB Mini-B (4-Pin) Images


Instead of the typical 5-pin Mini-B, this unofficial connector is found on many digital cameras, especially specific Kodak® models. It resembles the shape of a standard B-style connector, with beveled corners; however, it is much smaller.

Shop Popular USB Mini-B (4-Pin) Products
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9.8ft (3m) Ultima™ USB 2.0 A to Mini-B Cable

29652 | C2G

An ultra-premium, high-performance cable to connect your USB Mini-B device to the USB port on your USB hub, PC or Mac®

$7.99

6ft (1.8m) USB 2.0 USB-C to USB Mini-B Cable M/M – Black

28855 | C2G

Connect a USB-Mini B device to a USB Type-C port on a laptop, desktop computer, tablet, or other device.

$8.99

6.6ft (2m) USB 2.0 A to Mini-B Cable

27005 | C2G

Connect your 5-pin mini-USB camera or device to the USB port on your USB hub, PC or Mac®. Works for many camera models from the major brands.

$3.99

3.3ft (1m) USB 2.0 A to Mini-B Cable

27329 | C2G

Connect your 5-pin mini-USB camera or device to the USB port on your USB hub, PC or Mac®. Works for many camera models from the major brands.

$3.99

6.6ft (2m) Ultima™ USB 2.0 A to Mini-B Cable

29651 | C2G

An ultra-premium, high-performance cable to connect your USB Mini-B device to the USB port on your USB hub, PC or Mac®

$6.99

3ft (0.9m) USB 2.0 USB-C to USB Mini-B Cable M/M – Black

28854 | C2G

Connect a USB-Mini B device to a USB Type-C port on a laptop, desktop computer, tablet, or other device.

$9.99

6.6ft (2m) Ultima™ USB 2.0 A to Mini-B Cable for select Minolta, Samsung® and Toshiba™ Cameras (HIROSE KEY)

12342 | C2G

A high-performance replacement USB cable for select Minolta, Samsung® and Toshiba™ digital cameras

$6.63

$7.99

11in 4-Port USB 2.0 Hub Cable

27402 | C2G

It’s a hub AND it’s a cable! Connect 3 USB 2.0 devices and 1 Mini-b device to your PC with just one cable.

$18.99

6ft (1.8m) USB 2.0 Two A Male to One Mini-B Male Y-Cable

28107 | C2G

Increase the power running to a portable hard drive from your PC or Mac®

$9.99

12ft (3.7m) USB 2.0 USB-C to USB Mini-B Cable M/M – Black

28857 | C2G

Connect a USB-Mini B device to a USB Type-C port on a laptop, desktop computer, tablet, or other device.

$21.99

USB Mini-B (4-Pin) Male Iso

USB Mini-B (4-Pin) Male Front

USB Mini-B (4-Pin) Male Top

USB 3.0 Micro B Info

Shop Popular USB 3.0 Micro B Products


The USB 3.0 Micro-B connector is found on USB 3.0 devices. This connector design carries data and power in USB SuperSpeed applications. Cables with this connector are not backward compatible with USB 2.0 or USB 1.1 devices.

Shop Popular USB 3.0 Micro B Products

3.3ft (1m) USB 3.0 A Male to Micro B Male Cable

54176 | C2G

Compliant to USB 3.0 SuperSpeed specifications

$12.99

6.6ft (2m) USB 3.0 A Male to Micro B Male Cable

54177 | C2G

Compliant to USB 3.0 SuperSpeed specifications

$14.99

9.8ft (3m) USB 3. 0 A Male to Micro B Male Cable

54178 | C2G

Compliant to USB 3.0 SuperSpeed specifications

$17.99

Other Popular Connectors

USB-C, USB-B, and USB-A: What’s the Difference?

The USB-C, USB-B, and USB-A differences are most obvious in their physical form, but the distinctions run much deeper. USB-C is a more versatile and powerful standard and is set to be the main connector for years to come. However, the range of USB connectors leads to possible confusion.

Read on to discover how all that changes with USB-C. Or find out how ViewSonic USB-C monitors can bring you a whole host of benefits.

USB is an industry standard for cables and connectors. Like any technology, it has progressed over time and had various iterations, with significant speed and power improvements. The first version was released in 1996, and the most recent speed upgrade is USB4, released in 2019, though it is not yet widely implemented. As the speeds have increased, so has the physical design of the connectors, and the latest form factor, USB-C, marks a significant improvement on USB-A and USB-B.

USB: The Basics

USB, or universal serial bus, is a protocol and hardware standard for digital communications. That means that the USB standard specifies both the actual form of cabling and connectors and the structure of the data that passes through them. The original standard was released in 1996.

USB’s primary aim is indicated by the universal of the title. That is, it originally hoped to standardize communication and power sources for computer peripherals. This universality has only recently come close to reality with USB-C, but even the initial iterations greatly improved earlier connection technologies. Before USB, users had to contend with an array of different, bulky cables and connectors, such as parallel, serial, VGA, and PS/2 ports for keyboards and mice, which notoriously had the same form factor but were not functionally interchangeable.

A particular advantage of USB over these previous connections is that it combines data and power, largely avoiding the need for independent power supplies for external devices. That means you daisy-chain monitors to have a seamless viewing experience.

USB interfaces also typically require no additional configuration of data speed, input/output addresses, and memory access channels. Thus, USB devices are much more interchangeable and can also be hot-swapped. This flexibility continues to drive improvements in the USB standard and its current model in USB-C.

What Do I Need to Know About USB-C, USB-B, and USB-A Differences?

USB has had several different form specifications for its connectors. Originally, there were just two USB types, USB-A and USB-B. Now, USB-C is joining the game and now changing everything.

USB-A 

USB-A is the most commonly known USB type. The odds are you have plenty of USB-A connectors at home and you’re quite familiar with the way the look. It’s the cable with that one wider end. Only one, as the connector is not rotationally symmetrical and both ends are different, corresponding to a different type of port.

USB-B

Just like USB-A, it’s the original designation for the two ends of a non-symmetrical cable. The differing form of USB-A and USB-B helps to enforce the mono-directional aspect of these iterations of USB. Data flow is bi-directional, but power may only flow from the host to the peripheral or receptor end and, therefore, the cable can only be connected in one way.

Furthermore, there are mini and micro versions of both USB-A and USB-B, which causes confusion because users need various different cables for basic use cases and may find it difficult to plug devices in for the first time. Or the second.

USB-C

USB-C simplifies all things considered (we’ll explain that even more in depth later on). For starters, it’s fully reversible, so no matter what side you grab to plug, it’s all the same. Then, its bi-directional power capabilities allow for the power flow in both directions, having devices charge each other and power larger displays. Also, USB-C has better data rates which can drive high-resolution monitors. This point is a boon for all digital artists needing pristine sound and image production. Or anyone who seeks a plug-and-play connection for that matter. Besides, productivity and remaining in the workflow are also heavily dependent on having enough screen space, and USB-C provides just that. Work aside, USB-C monitors bring forth a high-quality home cinema experience.

The improvements are many, and we’re living in exciting times to see how USB-C can simplify our lives and work. Make sure you’re ready to make the most of it!

Workplace Ergonomics

USB-C for plug-n-play productivity

Discover the VG2455 >

Portable Monitors

Work Wherever Life Takes You

ViewSonic VG1665 >

What Is USB Used For?

USB was originally designed for computer peripherals: keyboards, mice, external disk drives, printers, scanners, cameras, and the like. However, mobile phones and tablets are among the most commonly connected devices using USB and flash drives since their earliest iterations. In addition, more recently, USB has become a versatile connector for audio and video devices like speakers, microphones, monitors, and webcams.

USB’s dual charging and data transmission capabilities mean that it can also be used solely for charging. USB ports on main sockets, adapters, and extension leads are now commonly seen for quick charging of mobile devices.

How Has USB Improved Over the Years?

USB currently has four major versions and three types. The version increments, from USB 1.0 through USB4, primarily mark speed increases. For example, the original USB 1.0 had a data rate of 1.5 megabits per second at a slow rate, increasing to 12 megabits per second at full speed. The data rate has improved significantly over the years, with USB 3.2 offering 20 gigabits per second. The most recent USB4 specification, released in 2019, will provide an impressive 40 gigabits per second when fully implemented through USB-C cables.

Since USB 3.1, which coincides with the introduction of USB-C, improvements have included the directionality of the cable. Previous iterations required specific ends for host and peripheral, whereas USB 3.1 introduced bi-directionality to match the bi-directional connector form of USB-C.

USB-A has a thin, rectangular cross-section and is generally used for the host end of the connection. Thus, USB-A ports may be found on laptops, desktops, media players, or game consoles. The original USB-B has a square cross-section with beveled top corners and attaches to peripherals like printers or external hard drives.

Miniaturized versions of USB-A and USB-B appeared with USB 2.0. These come in mini and micro versions and are more convenient for connecting small devices like mobiles and tablets. However, an issue with both the original, mini, and micro versions of USB-A and B is that the connectors are not rotationally symmetrical. This can lead to difficulty connecting as it may not always be obvious from the plastic housing which side is which.

What Improvements Does USB-C Bring?

One of the advantages of the USB-C standard over its forebears is its support for the much higher data rates of USB 3.2 and above, but there are more features. First, USB-C is fully bi-directional. At the simplest level, this means that both ends of the cable are physically the same, so there is no distinction between host and receptor.

USB-C also does away with the variety of previous sizes found for both USB-A and USB-C. It is only slightly larger than the previous micro-B connector, meaning that it is suitable for various devices, from small mobiles and tablets to larger visual displays. This simplicity means USB-C cables are highly interchangeable, so users can store fewer cables. Of course, laptop and desktop ports can also be simplified.

USB-C’s reversibility entails bi-directional charging, meaning that, in principle, at least, it’s possible to charge any device from any other. Not only is the directionality a problem for older USB cables, but they also don’t support the same level of charging. However, USB-C now supports enough power for a laptop and other larger devices. While USB-A could only support up to 2.5 watts and 5 volts, USB-C now supports 100 watts and 20 volts easily enough for larger devices.

The practical benefits of this include pass-through charging; effectively a USB hub that powers laptops, and also charges other devices simultaneously. Additionally, laptops can be powered by portable USB-C chargers, allowing greater flexibility when on the move.

One of the bugbears of USB-A, the lack of rotational symmetry of the connector, is fully resolved in USB-C. That is, there’s no top or bottom – you can rotate the plug both ways. That means no more fumbling around trying to get the connecter the right way around since it works both ways. Anyone who has ever had trouble trying to plug in a USB device will appreciate the value of this.

USB-C can be used to replace a variety of other connectors. Older USB-A, mini-USB, and micro-B connectors are obvious candidates. Still, because of USB-C’s data transfer rates and power capacities, it can also connect more significant devices like high-resolution interactive visual displays. For example, USB-C supports 8K resolutions with 10-bit color and is a fine replacement for HDMI.

Are There Any Downsides to USB-C?

USB-C is relatively new, so there have been some issues. Some early users complained that the standard is trying to do too much for all devices; an inevitable risk of bringing a universal solution into a complicated ecosystem. Since USB-C is a standard, actual implementations may vary, and they may not support all modes of operation.

However, these teething problems are no longer common. The tech community is always keen to embrace the future, and work has been done to resolve initial issues. Its prevalence indicates confidence in USB-C. It is now standard on many devices from major manufacturers like Microsoft and Intel. In fact, the European Union has proposed to have all electronic devices only fit USB-C to reduce e-waste and increase convenience. It’s only a matter of time before USB-C will be the standard.

Final Thoughts

USB-C is a forward-looking technology. It includes support for developing communication protocols that don’t exist yet, so there is room for progress. USB-C, USB-B, and USB-A differences may seem confusing, but USB-C is a huge improvement on two decades of confusion and looks set to clarify things for the future.

As we increasingly use more devices in our lives, whether for work, school, or entertainment, it is vital to know that USB-C would most likely be the port of the future. If you would like to know more about USB-C monitors, this article will guide you on what to look out for. If not, ViewSonic’s USB-C monitors are also an effective way to future-proof your desk setup.

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Guide to usb connectors and usb cables

USB (English Universal Serial Bus – “universal serial bus”) – was developed in 1990 in order to simplify the connection of peripheral devices to a computer. It has become popular due to its compatibility with many platforms and operating systems, as well as its low cost and ease of use. Most modern computers have multiple USB ports, as do most home and office equipment, including printers, cameras, modems, and portable storage devices.

The USB standards are developed and maintained by the USB Implementation Forum (USB-IF), an industry organization. In its original specification, USB only categorized into two connector types: A and B. Changes in specifications and manufacturer requirements have expanded the range of connectors used for USB devices, but most USB products still use the A and B connector interfaces.

Select the USB connector you would like to learn more about:

USB type A

USB type B

USB type C

Micro USB A

Micro USB B

USB Mini-b (5-pin)

USB Mini-b (4-pin)

USB 3.0 A Type

USB 3.0 B Type

USB 3.0 Micro B

More Connectors:

Micro USB AB

USB Mini-b (Fuji)

USB type A

Found on computer host controllers and hubs, the Type A connector is a flat, rectangular interface. This interface holds the connection in place with friction, making it very easy for users to connect and disconnect. Instead of round pins, the connector uses flat pins that withstand constant connection and disconnection very well. The Type A connector provides a downstream connection that is intended for use exclusively on host controllers and hubs. It is not designed to transfer information from the device to the computer. This is critical because the host controller or hub is designed to provide 5V DC on one of the USB pins. A-A cables are sometimes used to connect USB devices with a Type A jack to a computer or other USB device, or to transfer data between two computers.

Note. Typically, an A-A cable is not used to connect two computers, or to connect a USB hub between two computers. This can cause irreparable damage to your computer and even cause a fire. Before using an A-A data cable, consult the manufacturer.

Female:

USB type B

The Type B connector is for use with USB peripherals. The Type B interface has a square shape with slightly beveled corners. Like the Type A connector, it uses the friction of the connector body to secure it. Socket B is an upstream connector that is used for peripherals only. For this reason, most USB devices require an A-B cable.

Female:

USB type C

The USB-C or USB type C connector is the latest USB connector on the market. The USB-C connector is reversible/symmetrical and can be connected to any USB-C device. The USB-C cable can carry USB 3.1, USB 3.0, USB 2.0, and USB 1.1 signals. USB-C is usually paired with USB-A, USB-B, USB Micro-B, and other USB connectors while supporting previous versions of the USB specification. USB-C can be adapted to work with each of these legacy connectors. When connecting two USB 3.1 devices, the USB-C cable will support data transfer rates twice the speed of existing USB technology (up to 10 Gbps), improved power output up to 20 volts, 5 amps and 100 watts for power and charging, as well as a built-in support for DisplayPort video and 4-channel audio (speaker and microphone).

Micro-USB B

This USB-IF recognized connector can also be found on newer mobile devices such as mobile phones, GPS devices, PDAs and digital cameras. Micro-USB B is a physically smaller connector than USB Mini-b, but still supports high data transfer rates of 480 Mbps and On-The-Go functionality. The connector can be easily identified by its black receptacle and compact 5-pin design.

USB Mini-b (5-pin)

One of the disadvantages of connector B is its size – almost half an inch on each side. Because of this, interface B has become unsuitable for many compact personal electronic devices such as PDAs, digital cameras, and mobile phones. As a result, many device manufacturers began miniaturizing USB connectors, starting with Mini-b. This 5-pin Mini-b is the most popular type of Mini-b connector and the only one recognized by USB-IF. By default, the Mini-b cable is assumed to have 5 pins. This connector is quite small, about 2/3 the width of connector A. It is also intended for use in the newer USB On-The-Go standard, which allows peripherals to communicate in the presence of a host controller.

USB Mini-b (4-pin)

Instead of the usual 5-pin Mini-b, this unofficial connector is used in many digital cameras, especially some Kodak® models. It resembles the shape of a standard Type B connector with chamfered corners, but is much smaller.

USB 3.0 0 type A

This Type A connector, known as “SuperSpeed”, is commonly found on host controllers in computers and hubs and is a flat, rectangular interface. This interface holds the connection in place with friction, making it very easy for users to connect and disconnect. Instead of round pins, the connector uses flat pins that withstand constant connection and disconnection very well. Connector A provides a downstream connection that is intended for use exclusively on host controllers and hubs. This connector is similar in size and shape to the Type A connector used in USB 2. 0 and USB 1.1 devices. However, USB 3.0 Type A has additional pins that USB 2.0 and USB 1.1 Type A do not. The USB 3.0 connector is designed for USB SuperSpeed ​​devices, however it will transfer data from slower connectors and is backwards compatible with USB 2.0 ports. USB 3.0 A connectors can be distinguished from previous versions by their blue color.

USB 3.0 type B

The USB 3.0 B-type connector is found on USB 3.0 devices. This connector is designed to transfer data and power USB SuperSpeed ​​devices. Cables with this connector are not backward compatible with USB 2.0 or USB 1.1 devices; however, USB 3.0 devices with this type of connection can connect to previous USB 2.0 and 1.1 cables.

USB 3.0 Micro B

The USB 3.0 Micro B connector is found in USB 3.0 devices. This connector is designed to transfer data and power USB SuperSpeed ​​devices. Cables with this connector are not backward compatible with USB 2.0 or USB 1.1 devices.

Female:

Micro USB AB

Designed exclusively for USB On-The-Go devices, this versatile connector can connect to a Micro-USB A or Micro-USB B cable. This interface is easy to identify with its gray receptacle and compact 5-pin design. This type of connector exists only as a socket for On-The-Go devices, but cables with this connector do not exist.

Micro USB A

This USB-IF recognized connector can be found on newer mobile devices such as mobile phones, GPS devices, PDAs, and digital cameras. Micro-USB A is a connector that is physically smaller than USB Mini-b, but supports high data transfer rates of 480 Mbps and On-The-Go functionality. The connection is easily identified by the white socket and compact 5-pin design.

USB Mini-b (Fuji

® )

This is another unofficial connector that is also widely used on digital cameras, especially on some Fuji® models. Because of its flat, rectangular shape, it looks more like an A-type connector.

4 Different types of USB cables [and variations]

USB or Universal Serial Bus is a standard connection type and communication medium between a wide range of electrical devices, including computers and peripherals.

It entered service in 1996. The idea was to standardize communication or data transfer between peripherals and computers by replacing older communication interfaces such as parallel and serial ports (not to be confused with the communication/data transfer process) and FireWire.

Do you know? The USB standard is governed by the USB Developer Forum (USB-IF), established by founding companies including IBM, Intel, Microsoft, and Nortel.

Where is USB used?

As an industry standard, USB cables are used to connect desktop or laptop computers to external hardware devices such as keyboards, mice, flash drives, printers, and game controllers.

The USB interface has become so popular in recent years that you can easily find them even in cars and electrical outlets in homes. Modern smartphones, tablets, and many portable devices now support USB cables and fast charging connectors compared to other types of cables.

Benefits of the USB interface

  • Although USB was primarily designed to facilitate communication between personal computers and accessories, there are several other benefits of the USB interface.
  • It is self-configuring, which means that there is no need to adjust/configure its parameters before use.
  • USB devices can be added or replaced to the system without shutting down or rebooting the system (hot swappable).
  • Its power capability allows small devices to be powered without an additional power cable.
  • The USB communication protocol and signal reception are always reliable regardless of their version.

USB Types by Version

There are two ways to classify a USB cable; based on its version or generation, which concerns the functionality (data rate) of the cable, and on its physical design.

Before we get into the different types of USB cables, let’s first understand a few terms associated with them. A typical USB cable has two connectors, one on each side. One is for the host, which includes all types of computers (PCs, tablets), and the other is for the receiver, any portable device (smartphone) to which you want to transfer data. The slot where the USB is inserted is called a port or socket. Anyway, let’s get down to business.

Since 1996, four major versions or generations of the USB standards have been introduced. These are USB 1.0, USB 2.0, USB 3.0 and USB4. USB4 is the latest.

A table showing the various USB versions and the transfer rates they support.

Original USB, USB 1.0, supports dual speed bus with 1.5Mbps data rate for low cost, low data rate devices (keyboards, mice) and 12 Mbps for high data rate devices (printers, disk drives) . This multi-bus architecture has been expanded to USB 2.0 (launched 2001). However, a third, “high-speed” bus was added, with a maximum data rate of 480 Mbps.

The Universal Serial Bus first gained attention in 1988 (when USB 1.1 was introduced) with the release of the Apple iMac. It was the first widely known product with USB technology. PC makers soon followed suit, replacing obsolete ports with USB in their products. So the initial success of USB is tied to the success of the iMac.

USB 3.0

USB 3.0, released on November 12, 2008, revolutionized the industry. It introduced a much higher speed bus with data rates up to 5Gbps (in addition to existing baud rate modes) and higher output power (900 mA compared to 500 mA in previous versions). What’s more, it has been backwards compatible with USB 2.0, which ensures interoperability. This version of USB is known as SuperSpeed.

USB 3.0 Gen 1 ports

The USB 3.0 standard was replaced by USB 3.1 in 2014. USB 3.1 Gen 2 (SuperSpeed+) transfer speed has been increased to 10Gbps. One of the important changes pushed by the USB 3.1 standard was the replacement of their previous 8b/10b encoding scheme with the more efficient 128b/132b, a variant of 64b/66b encoding (which converts 64-bit data to a 66-bit line code). This greatly reduces the overhead of encoding, resulting in comparatively higher effective data rates.

The next USB 3.2 standard was released in 2017. As expected, it introduced a new, much faster transfer mode while retaining all existing modes. This allowed USB-C cables (supported by 3.1) to operate at up to 2x their initial speed (5Gbps to 10Gbps for USB-C 3.1 Gen 1 cables and 10Gbps to 20Gbps for USB-C 3.1 Gen 1 cables). Gen 2). We’ll talk about USB-C cables later.

USB4 or USB 4.0

The latest USB standard, USB4 (or USB 4), expands the existing capabilities of USB-C cables to maximize available USB bandwidth. It is based on the Thunderbolt protocol, which offers advanced features such as bidirectional data transmission (sending and receiving data from both ends), dual protocol data, and low latency video transmission over a single cable.

USB4 is Thunderbolt 3 compliant and backward compatible with USB 2.0 and USB 3.2 specifications. It supports a maximum data transfer rate of 40Gbps. Existing USB-C cables achieve these speeds through dual-lane operation, where two lanes in a cable transmit data at the same time.

Intel 11th Gen Tiger Lake core processor is the first product to support USB4 or Thunderbolt 4.

USB cable types [depending on their physical structure]

Almost all electronic products, from smartphones and small portable devices to computers of all types, now have USB ports or USB support. However, the physical characteristics of the USB ports and connectors vary by product class.

USB cables can be divided into three types based on their physical characteristics or layout: USB-A, USB-B, and USB-C.

USB Type-A

USB-A is perhaps the most popular USB (connector or port) you can find on your PCs, game consoles, portable media players and smartphone charging ports. The standard USB Type-A plug has a flat, rectangular shape.

Older USB Type-A connectors and USB 2.0 ports have four internal pins; one pair is for data transmission and the other is for power. With the introduction of the USB 3.0 standard, five extra pins were added to the original design to make the new USB Type-A (SuperSpeed) ports and connectors faster and backward compatible with older versions of USB.

USB Type-B

USB Type B ports are typically found on receivers or peripherals such as printers and scanners that operate at high data rates and are relatively larger (compared to other peripherals).

In most cases, the USB cable that connects the computer to the printer or scanner has a USB Type B connector on one side and a Type A connector on the other. Although they are usually dual-purpose, some Type B ports only allow host power.

There are two versions of USB Type-B. The original USB Type-B connector is square with a slightly angled top outer rim. It supports data transfer rates up to 480 Mbps (USB 2.0).

USB 3.0 Type-B connector

An improved version of the Type-B connector, Type-B SuperSpeed, was introduced to make them compliant with the USB 3.0 standard. Type-B SuperSpeed ​​cables with data rates over 5Gbps are ideal for connecting PCs with external hard drives and audio interfaces.

USB Mini and Micro Type B

USB Micro-B connector

Mini-USB connectors were first introduced in 1998 for electronic devices such as early smartphones and tablet computers. While Mini-A connectors have long since been discontinued, Mini Type-B is still supported by a small number of devices.

Micro-USB connectors are designed specifically for modern portable devices such as smartphones and cameras, which are much thinner than earlier devices. The thickness of the Micro-USB connector is almost half that of the Mini-USB.

USB-C

USB-C is the industry standard for high-speed data transfer and power, and is now used in a growing number of devices, including the latest smartphones, external solid state drives, and expensive laptops.

The USB-C connector may at first appear similar to the Micro-USB connector as both have curved edges, although the USB-C connector is slightly thicker and wider.

USB-C connector

Perhaps the most important and desirable feature of USB-C connectors is their switchability. This means that USB-C connectors are not oriented up or down (as is the case with USB-A and USB-B connectors). They can be inserted correctly each time without turning over.

Another benefit of USB-C cables is that they carry at least 3A at 60W. USB-C to USB-C cables are designed to carry the higher 5V current.

USB-C cables based on the USB 3.1 standard have a maximum transfer limit of 10 Gbps. Older cables that support USB 2.0 can only transfer up to 480 Mbps.

USB OTG

USB OTG cables

USB On-The-Go or OTG is a USB specification that allows certain devices to act as both a host and a receiver. For example, with OTG, a smartphone can read data as a host when connected to a digital camera or flash drive, but act as a receiver when connected to a host computer.

What’s in the future?

There is a popular saying that “nothing lasts forever”, and in the world of technology, this could not be more accurate. While Type-A and Type-B ports and cables are still widely used, USB-C is poised to replace them in the near future.

USB-C port on MacBook

The latest USB-C ports support the Thunderbolt 3 protocol, which provides maximum data transfer speeds of up to 40 Gbps.