Memory card of camera: Digital Camera Sd Cards : Target

Lexar Professional 2000x SDHC/SDXC UHS-II card review

Digital Camera World Verdict

Lexar is a widely-known and respect memory card brand and the Gold Series cards are the company’s flagship models. The Professional 2000x SDHC/SDXC UHS-II cards do not disappoint, giving reliable service and enabling high-quality video and stills recording.

Pros
  • +

    Good range of capacities

  • +

    Excellent read speed

  • +

    Good in-camera performance

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Lexar is one of the most widely-recognised memory card brands and the Professional 2000x SDHC/SDXC UHS-II cards are part of the company’s flagship series. Starting with a SDHC card that has a capacity of 32GB, and going all the way up to SDXC cards with capacities of 64GB, 128GB and 256GB, there are options for every type of photographer although they commend a higher price than the less well-known Kingston Canvas React Plus cards.

The Professional 2000x SDHC/SDXC UHS-II cards have a video speed class of V90 and offer a maximum read speed of up to 300MB/s while the write speed tops out at 260MB/s. This makes them suitable for recording 4K and some 8K video as well as capturing high-resolution stills at fast frame rates.

(Image credit: Angela Nicholson/Digital Camera World)

Specifications

Max read speed: 300MB/s

Max write speed: 260MB/s

Available capacities: 32GB, 64GB, 128GB, 256GB

Today’s best Lexar Professional 2000x SD UHS-II deals

Lexar Professional 2000x 32GB SDHC

$42.99

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Lexar 128GB 2000x Professional SDXC RDR

$179.99

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Lexar Professional 2000x SDXC UHS-II

$221.99

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Build and handling

(Image credit: Angela Nicholson/Digital Camera World)

(Image credit: Angela Nicholson/Digital Camera World)

Measuring 32 x 24 x 2. 1mm, the Lexar Professional 2000x SDHC/SDXC UHS-II cards are the same size as all other SD cards. They also have the same plastic construction with two rows of connections on the rear indicating their UHS-II status.

In keeping with the Gold series name, the Professional 2000x cards have a splash of gold on the label, making them instantly recognizable amongst a pile of other cards. 

The slips into a card or card reader slot with our issue and the lock on its left side slides with a satisfying pop from one end to the other. Crucially, the lock isn’t prone to being moved accidentally.

According to Lexar, the Professional 2000x cards are capable of operating in a temperature range of 0ºC to 70 ºC and will survive being at-25ºC to 85 ºC. It’s also said to be shockproof to 200G, vibration proof and X-ray-proof to ISO7816-1 guidelines. Interestingly, Lexar’s entry-level Blue series cards have the same rugged design.

Performance

(Image credit: Angela Nicholson/Digital Camera World)

I have been using a 128GB Lexar Professional 2000x SDXC UHS-II card heavily for several months and it has performed perfectly in numerous cameras. In the 45.7MP Nikon Z 7II, I was able to shoot up to around 104 Fine quality Jpegs, 91 Fine* quality Jpegs or 39  uncompressed 14-bit raw files at 10fps, each in one continuous sequence. The card also enables long clips of 4K and 8K video to be recorded, however, as you’d expect, the most processor-intensive 8K options such as raw and ALL-I recording are not possible.

Another key factor for photographers is the length of time that it takes images to transfer from a memory card to a computer. When the Lexar card was inserted into the UHS-II SD card port of a ProGrade card reader, it took just under 1 minute 40 seconds to transfer 9.7GB of images (100 Fine* Jpegs and 100 14-bit uncompressed raw files) from the Nikon Z 7II.

Running the Lexar Professional 2000x SDXC UHS-II card through Blackmagic Design’s Disk Speed Test revealed read speeds of around 171MB/s and write speeds of 255MB/s. It’s very common for cards to not match the claimed speeds in bench tests, but these figures are still very good. The software also indicates that if the camera permits it, the card is fast enough to record 8K raw video at up to 24p.

Verdict

(Image credit: Angela Nicholson/Digital Camera World)

The Lexar Professional 2000x SDXC UHS-II hasn’t skipped a beat during my testing, I’ve had no corrupted images and no unexpected interruptions in video recording. It’s also allowed me to shoot long sequences of images to capture sport and action. 

At around $190/£179 for the 128GB version, it’s not the cheapest on the market, but it’s a solid performer from a well-known and reliable brand. If you want the same performance at more affordable price, the 64GB card retails for a shade under $80/£85.

Today’s best Lexar Professional 2000x SD UHS-II deals

Lexar Professional 2000x 32GB SDHC

$42.99

View

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Lexar 128GB 2000x Professional SDXC RDR

$179.99

View

See all prices

Lexar Professional 2000x SDXC UHS-II

$221.99

View

See all prices

Read more
Best memory cards
Best memory card readers
Why do some SD cards have two rows of pins?
Best CFexpress cards
What is CFexpress Type A?
Best CFast cards

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Angela has been testing camera gear from all the major manufacturers since January 2004 and has been Amateur Photographer’s Technical Editor and Head of Testing for Future Publishing’s photography portfolio (Digital Camera Magazine, PhotoPlus: The Canon Magazine, N-Photo, Practical Photoshop, Photography Week and Professional Photography magazines, as well as the Digital Camera World and TechRadar websites).

8 Types of Camera Memory Cards

© EKKAPHAN CHIMPALEE / Shutterstock.com

Memory cards are an essential component of modern cameras. They function as a digital storage device, allowing photographers to easily store and transfer their photographs and videos. Capturing and sharing photos would be impossible without memory cards. This article will go over the various types of camera memory cards that are commonly used in the industry.

Types of Camera Memory Cards: Overview

  • Secure Digital (SD) Cards: SD cards are the most popular type of memory card used in cameras. They are available in a variety of sizes, including SD, SDHC, and SDXC, with varying storage capacities. SD cards are inexpensive, and they are the primary storage device for most point-and-shoot cameras and DSLRs. SD cards are popular among photographers of all skill levels because they are simple to use and transfer data quickly.
  • CompactFlash (CF) Cards: CompactFlash cards are larger and faster than SD cards and are commonly found in high-end DSLRs and video cameras. They provide faster read and write speeds, which is critical when capturing high-resolution images and videos. Professional photographers and videographers who need to capture high-quality content quickly should use CF cards.
  • Memory Stick (MS) Cards: MS cards are exclusive to Sony cameras and are not interchangeable with other camera brands. Memory Stick, Memory Stick Pro, and Memory Stick Duo are the various sizes available. These cards are frequently used in Sony cameras because they provide fast read and write speeds, making them ideal for capturing high-quality images and videos.
  • XQD Cards: XQD cards are a newer type of memory card that can read and write data faster than CompactFlash cards. They are most commonly found in high-end DSLRs and video cameras. XQD cards have the same form factor as CF cards, but they have faster speeds and larger capacities, making them ideal for professional photographers and videographers.
  • CFexpress Cards: Another newer type of memory card that has the same form factor as XQD cards is CFexpress. CFexpress cards have higher capacities and faster speeds than XQD cards, making them ideal for photographers and videographers who need to capture high-quality images and videos quickly.
  • MicroSD Cards: MicroSD cards, which are smaller than SD cards, are widely used in action cameras, drones, and smartphones. They can also be used in cameras that accept SD cards with an adapter. MicroSD cards are inexpensive, simple to use, and fast at transferring data, making them a popular choice for photographers looking for a compact and portable storage solution.
  • MultiMediaCard (MMC) Cards: MultiMediaCard cards are the same size as SD cards but are less common. They were popular in the early days of digital cameras, but SD cards have largely replaced them. MMC cards have faster read and write speeds than SD cards, but they are not as compatible with modern cameras.
  • SmartMedia (SM) Cards: SmartMedia cards were popular in the late 1990s and early 2000s, but they were later phased out. They were used in some early digital cameras and had limited storage capacity. SmartMedia cards have been phased out in favor of more modern and efficient memory card types.

Secure Digital (SD) Cards

Our Pick

SanDisk 128 GB SD Card

$19.99

  • Card offload speeds of up to 200 MB/s 
  • Shot speeds up to 90 MB/s
  • UHS Speed Class 3 (U3) and Video Speed Class 30 (V30)
  • Perfect for shooting 4K UHD video

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06/29/2023 10:10 am GMT

The Secure Digital (SD) card is one of the most popular types of camera memory cards. SD cards are popular due to their low cost, ease of use, and fast data transfer speeds. These cards come in a variety of sizes, including SD, SDHC, and SDXC, and with varying storage capacities.

SD cards are widely used in point-and-shoot cameras as well as DSLRs. They provide a quick and easy way to store and transfer images and videos. Furthermore, SD cards are built to withstand extreme temperatures, making them an excellent choice for outdoor photography.

When selecting an SD card, consider the size that best suits the needs of your camera. SD cards are available in a variety of sizes, each with a different storage capacity. SD cards can have storage capacities ranging from 2GB to 2TB.

CompactFlash (CF) Cards

Our Pick

SanDisk Extreme CompactFlash Memory Card

$29.99

  • Read speeds of up to 120MB/s
  • Write speeds of up to 85MB/s
  • Data recording rate of 20MB/s
  • Includes RTV silicone coating for protection 

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06/29/2023 10:10 am GMT

CompactFlash (CF) cards are another type of camera memory card. CF cards are larger in size and have been used for many years in professional-level DSLRs and high-end video cameras. Since their introduction in 1994, CF cards have been widely used by professionals.

CF cards are larger in physical size and have a more robust design than SD cards. They have faster read and write speeds, making them a popular choice for professionals who need fast performance. CF cards come in a variety of storage capacities ranging from 128MB to 256GB.

CF cards are widely used in high-end DSLRs and video cameras where speed and reliability are essential. They are built to handle large amounts of data transfer, making them ideal for high-resolution continuous shooting and recording. CF cards can also withstand high temperatures, making them suitable for use in harsh environments.

Memory Stick (MS) Cards

Our Pick

Memory Stick Pro Duo Card

$16.95

  • Compatible with MagicGate copyright protection technology
  • Ideal for high-speed data transfer and continuous shooting
  • Up to 30MB read and write speed

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06/29/2023 10:10 am GMT

Memory Stick (MS) cards are a type of camera memory card that is more proprietary than other types of cards. Sony developed MS cards in 1998, initially for Sony digital cameras and camcorders. As a result, they’re mostly found in Sony cameras and other Sony devices.

Memory Stick cards are available in a variety of sizes, including the original Memory Stick, Memory Stick Pro, and Memory Stick Duo. The original Memory Stick can hold up to 128MB of data, while the Memory Stick Pro and Memory Stick Duo can hold up to 32GB and 16GB of data, respectively.

MS cards are primarily used in Sony cameras and other Sony products due to their proprietary nature. They have fast data transfer rates, which makes them perfect for capturing high-quality images and videos. MS cards are also tough and built to withstand extreme temperatures, making them an excellent choice for outdoor photography.

While MS cards are not as popular as SD cards, they are a viable option for Sony camera owners. If you own a Sony camera or other Sony device, an MS card can make it easier to store and transfer your photos and videos.

XQD Cards

Our Pick

Nikon XQD 64GB Memory Card

$159.98

  • Supports PCIe 2.0 and USB 3.0
  • Max. Read Speed: 440 MB/s
  • Max. Write Speed: 400 MB/s

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06/29/2023 10:15 am GMT “/>

Another type of camera memory card that has gained popularity in recent years is the XQD card. XQD cards were created in 2010 by Sony and Nikon to replace CompactFlash (CF) cards. They are smaller than CF cards, but they have faster read and write speeds.

XQD cards are smaller in physical size than CF cards, making them more compact and easier to store. They can, however, transfer data at faster rates, making them a popular choice for professionals who require high-speed performance. XQD cards now have larger storage capacities, with the most recent cards capable of storing up to 240GB.

XQD cards are commonly used in high-end DSLRs and video cameras that require fast data transfer speeds. They are built to handle large amounts of data, making them ideal for capturing high-resolution images and video. XQD cards can also withstand high temperatures, making them suitable for use in harsh environments.

CFexpress Cards

Our Pick

SanDisk 128GB CFexpress Card

$139. 60

  • Read speeds of up to 1700MB/s
  • Write speeds of up to 1400MB/s
  • Backward-compatible with select XQD cameras
  • Includes RescuePRO Deluxe Recovery Software

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06/29/2023 10:15 am GMT

CFexpress cards are the most recent addition to the market of camera memory cards. These cards are an evolution of XQD cards, designed to provide faster read and write speeds. They have a physical form factor similar to XQD cards but use a different interface for faster data transfer.

CFexpress cards have faster read and write speeds than XQD cards, making them ideal for professionals who require high-speed performance. They also have greater storage capacities, with some cards storing up to 1TB of data. Because of these advantages, CFexpress cards are an excellent choice for photographers and videographers who work with large files and need fast data transfer speeds.

Because CFexpress cards are backward compatible with XQD cards, users can upgrade their storage without replacing their camera or other equipment. While XQD cards remain a popular choice for many professionals, CFexpress cards offer faster speeds and larger capacities, making them a more appealing option for those who need the best performance.

MicroSD Cards

Our Pick

SanDisk 256GB microSD Memory Card

$21.99

  • Offload speeds of up to 190MB/s
  • Up to 130MB/s write speeds for fast shooting
  • UHS Speed Class 3

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06/29/2023 10:15 am GMT

MicroSD cards are a smaller version of standard SD cards that are popular in action cameras, drones, and smartphones. These cards are small and lightweight, making them ideal for use in devices with limited space.

MicroSD cards are available in a variety of sizes and speeds, with the most common being microSDHC and microSDXC. MicroSDHC cards can hold up to 32GB of data, while microSDXC cards can hold up to 2TB. They also differ in read and write speeds, with faster cards costing more.

One of the benefits of microSD cards is their adaptability. They can be used in cameras that accept SD cards with an adapter, making them an excellent choice for those who need to transfer data between devices. This means that users can use the same card in their camera and smartphone without having to buy separate cards for each device.

MultiMediaCard (MMC) Cards

MultiMediaCard (MMC) cards were among the first memory cards used in digital cameras. These cards resemble SD cards in size and shape, but they have different pin layouts and do not provide the same level of compatibility.

MMC cards have slower read and write speeds than SD cards, making them less suitable for use in modern cameras. They are also smaller in size, with the largest MMC card only offering 4GB of storage.

MMC cards have declined in popularity since the early days of digital cameras due to the rise of other memory card formats, such as SD cards. While they may still be found in some older cameras and other devices, they are rarely found in modern cameras.

Despite their decline in popularity, MMC cards were critical in the development of digital cameras, paving the way for the many different types of memory cards that are now available. While they are not as widely used as they once were, they are still an important part of digital photography history.

SmartMedia (SM) Cards

Our Pick

16mb 3.3v Smartmedia SM Memory Card

$18.99

  • Compatible with early digital cameras
  • 3.3V ± 5% power supply voltage
  • In line with standard PC card 95

Buy Now on Amazon

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06/29/2023 10:15 am GMT “/>

SmartMedia (SM) cards were among the first camera memory cards. They were popular in the late 1990s and early 2000s, but their popularity has since declined due to their limited storage capacity and slower speeds when compared to modern memory cards.

SM cards were used in some early digital cameras, but they have since been largely replaced by more advanced memory card types with larger storage capacities and faster transfer speeds. Although SM cards are no longer commonly used in digital cameras, they may be useful for older devices or for archival purposes.

Conclusion

We’ve gone over the eight different types of camera memory cards. Secure Digital (SD) cards, CompactFlash (CF) cards, Memory Stick (MS) cards, XQD cards, CFexpress cards, MicroSD cards, MultiMediaCard (MMC) cards, and SmartMedia (SM) cards are examples of these media. Each type has its own distinct set of characteristics, benefits, and drawbacks.

To ensure optimal performance and avoid potential issues, it is critical to select the correct memory card for your camera. When choosing a memory card, consider the type of camera, intended use, capacity, and speed. You can capture high-quality images and videos with the right memory card without worrying about storage limitations or data loss.

  1. SanDisk 128 GB SD Card
  2. $19.99

    • Card offload speeds of up to 200 MB/s 
    • Shot speeds up to 90 MB/s
    • UHS Speed Class 3 (U3) and Video Speed Class 30 (V30)
    • Perfect for shooting 4K UHD video

    Buy Now on Amazon

    We earn a commission if you make a purchase, at no additional cost to you.

    06/29/2023 10:10 am GMT

  3. SanDisk Extreme CompactFlash Memory Card
  4. $29.99

    • Read speeds of up to 120MB/s
    • Write speeds of up to 85MB/s
    • Data recording rate of 20MB/s
    • Includes RTV silicone coating for protection 

    Buy Now on Amazon

    We earn a commission if you make a purchase, at no additional cost to you.

    06/29/2023 10:10 am GMT

  5. Memory Stick Pro Duo Card
  6. $16.95

    • Compatible with MagicGate copyright protection technology
    • Ideal for high-speed data transfer and continuous shooting
    • Up to 30MB read and write speed

    Buy Now on Amazon

    We earn a commission if you make a purchase, at no additional cost to you.

    06/29/2023 10:10 am GMT

  7. Nikon XQD 64GB Memory Card
  8. $159.98

    • Supports PCIe 2.0 and USB 3.0
    • Max. Read Speed: 440 MB/s
    • Max. Write Speed: 400 MB/s

    Buy Now on Amazon

    We earn a commission if you make a purchase, at no additional cost to you.

    06/29/2023 10:15 am GMT “/>

  9. SanDisk 128GB CFexpress Card
  10. $139.60

    • Read speeds of up to 1700MB/s
    • Write speeds of up to 1400MB/s
    • Backward-compatible with select XQD cameras
    • Includes RescuePRO Deluxe Recovery Software

    Buy Now on Amazon

    We earn a commission if you make a purchase, at no additional cost to you.

    06/29/2023 10:15 am GMT

  11. SanDisk 256GB microSD Memory Card
  12. $21.99

    • Offload speeds of up to 190MB/s
    • Up to 130MB/s write speeds for fast shooting
    • UHS Speed Class 3

    Buy Now on Amazon

    We earn a commission if you make a purchase, at no additional cost to you.

    06/29/2023 10:15 am GMT

  13. 16mb 3.3v Smartmedia SM Memory Card
  14. $18.99

    • Compatible with early digital cameras
    • 3. 3V ± 5% power supply voltage
    • In line with standard PC card 95

    Buy Now on Amazon

    We earn a commission if you make a purchase, at no additional cost to you.

    06/29/2023 10:15 am GMT

8 Types of Camera Memory Cards FAQs (Frequently Asked Questions) 

What are the different types of SD cards for camera?

SD cards for cameras are classified into three types: SD, SDHC, and SDXC. SD cards can hold up to 2GB of data, SDHC cards can hold up to 32GB of data, and SDXC cards can hold up to 2TB of data.

Do all memory cards fit all cameras?

No, not all memory cards are compatible with all cameras. Different cameras have different specifications and may require different memory card types and sizes. To determine which memory cards are compatible, consult your camera’s manual or specifications.

What are three 3 types of flash memory cards?

Secure Digital (SD) cards, CompactFlash (CF) cards, and Memory Stick (MS) cards are the three types of flash memory cards.

What is the difference between SD card and flash card?

An SD card and a flash card are interchangeable. An SD card is a type of flash memory card, and the term “flash card” is frequently used as a generic term to refer to various types of memory cards that store data using flash memory technology.

How do I know what memory card to get?

To choose the best memory card for your camera, consider the type of camera you have and the memory card it supports, as well as the storage capacity and speed requirements for your specific needs. For information on compatible memory cards, consult your camera’s manual or the manufacturer’s website.

Memory cards. Which one to choose?

Memory cards. Which one to choose?

Why you shouldn’t take a slow card

  • Video recording creates corrupted files or downgrades video recording to match card speed.
  • When you press the shutter button, the camera does not immediately allow you to take a second photo (recording to the memory card).
  • The camera freezes, the video suddenly breaks when the maximum recording speed of the memory card is reached, creating videos that are short in time.
  • SD cards (Secure Digital)0003

    This is the most common type of memory card. We will dwell on it in more detail.

    available 2 variations :

    SDHC – cards up to 32 GB ;

    SDXC – cards up to 2TB .

    Speed ​​class (“C”) indicates the maximum possible write speed. It happens 2, 4, 6, 10 class . The class number points to is the minimum allowed write speed for the memory card in megabytes per second.

    Also introduced for SD cards standard UHS (Ultra High Speed) – high-speed communication protocol.

    Now there are three versions of the UHS standard:

    UHS-I – transmits data at speeds up to 100 Mb / s;

    UHS-II – Transfers data at up to 312 Mbps;

    UHS-III – Transfers data at speeds up to 624 Mbps.

    If the second version allows you to record 4K video, then with the third version you can already record 8K and 360 !

    Inside UHS there are also speed classes :

    Class 1 (U1) – from 10 MB / s;

    Class 3 (U3) – from 30 MB/s.

    Last speed class Video Speed ​​Class was created to support higher resolution video. Such memory cards are usually marked with a “V”.

    There are 5 categories in the Video Speed ​​Class:

    V6 (Class 6) : minimum recording speed 6MB/s – allows you to record HD video;

    V10 (Class 10) : 10MB/s minimum write speed – allows you to record Full HD video;

    V30 (Class 30) : 30MB/s minimum write speed – allows 4K recording at 60/120 fps;

    V60 (Class 60) : minimum write speed 60MB/s – allows you to record 8K at 60/120 fps;

    V90 (Class 90) : 90MB/s minimum write speed – allows you to record 8K at 60/120 fps.

    SD cards can also use the card speed designation as a multiplier of , for example 133x. In this case, 1x corresponds to the speed of 150 Kb / s.

    Unfortunately, this standard does not specify what speed the memory card means: writing or reading. Therefore, manufacturers often indicate a read speed that is greater than the write speed.

    to exFAT which does not have this limitation.

    Another important point: SDHC memory cards use the FAT32 file system, the maximum file size on which is 4 GB. Therefore, when recording, the maximum length of one clip will be limited.

    SDXC, in turn, uses the exFAT file system, which does not have this limitation.

    Micro SD

    MicroSD cards are used in certain cases (for example, when the device is small).

    The cards also have 2 variations:

    microSDHC – drives up to 32 GB, work on devices with SDHC and SDXC support;

    microSDXC – drives up to 2 TB, work only on devices that support SDXC.

    These cards have all designations and standards that correspond to SD cards. In addition, with the help of a Micro SD adapter, it is easy to turn it into an SD card.

    There are also faster memory cards – CFexpress Type-A and Type-B , СFast , XQD . These cards are used in photo and video cameras that are more demanding on recording speed. In such as, for example: Canon R5 , Sony A7S III , Nikon Z7 II .

    We will talk about them in a separate article.

    CFexpress – XQD – CFast – CF

    CFexpress

    Divided into three types: A, B and C .

    Type A.

    The smallest card in the CFexpress family.

    Its dimensions are:

    20mm x 28mm x 2.8mm.

    The maximum theoretical write speed can reach 1,000MB/s.

    Currently used in new Sony cameras, for example: A7SIII and A1

    Type B.

    The most common card in the 9 family0005 CFexpress .

    Its dimensions are:

    38.5mm x 29.6mm x 3.8mm. They are identical to the size of XQD cards, and therefore, with firmware, manufacturers added the ability to use CFexpress cards in XQD slots, for example: Nikon Z6 and Z7.

    The maximum theoretical write speed can reach 2,000MB/s.

    Used in most cameras with CFexpress slot:

    Canon EOS R5, Nikon Z7II, Panasonic S1R, etc.

    Type C.

    Largest card in the CFexpress family.

    Its dimensions are:

    54mm x 74mm x 4.8mm. Designed to work with computers and SSDs.

    The maximum theoretical write speed can reach 4,000MB/s.

    In order not to get confused on the cards, the type of the card is always indicated.

    XQD

    A memory card format developed by SanDisk, Sony, and Nikon and approved by the CompactFlash Assotiation in 2010-2011. As mentioned earlier, this format is identical to CFexpress Tybe B, both in size and contact group.

    The interface bandwidth is 2.5Gbps , the current write speed is up to 125MB/s

    The format is licensed by Sony, cameras with XQD connector are manufactured by Nikon.

    CompactFlash (CF)

    Brand name for one of the first flash memory card formats. The format was developed by SanDisk Corporation in 1994.

    Despite their age, cards of this format are still popular in photographic equipment thanks to record speed and capacity. In 2014, the maximum capacity of CompactFlash drives reached 512 GB .

    There are two types of cards: CompactFlash Type I and Type II . The Type II card variant was created exclusively for miniature Microdrive hard drives and may be considered obsolete today. The dimensions of CompactFlash Type I cards are 42 mm by 36 mm, the thickness is 3.3 mm, CompactFlash Type II is 5 mm.

    Cards CompactFlash Type I can be inserted into slots of both sizes , CompactFlash Type II – only in slot for CompactFlash Type II .

    CFAST

    CFast is an evolution of the CompactFlash standard on the SATA bus.

    CFast cards are not compatible with CF, have a standard 7-pin SATA connector and a 17-pin power connector.

    CFast 2.0 – the second generation of cards. Recording speed 3400× (510 MB/s) . In 2016, Canon built an additional memory card slot of this standard into its Canon EOS-1D X Mark II camera, replacing the duplicating CompactFlash slot with it.

    Memory card size

    How many photo and video files will fit on the device depends on the choice of volume.

    For example, with a single photo size of 5 MB and a memory card with 1 GB of memory, about 200 photos will fit.

    Also, if you shoot 4K video, then 1 second in this quality can take at least 10 MB, that is, approximately 1 hour of shooting will fit on 32 GB.

    If you know that you have heavy files, we recommend choosing a memory card from 128 GB so that there are no unpleasant “surprises” with unexpectedly running out of space during the shooting.

    Speed ​​load

    Memory card load is the maximum data rate

    (bitrate), which the device outputs. It should not exceed its maximum write speed.

    To understand how fast your memory card can withstand when taking photos, check the camera’s specifications. When recording a video, the data stream can be viewed in the properties of the video file.

    Remember : the higher the class of the camera, the greater the load on the memory card. However, when choosing memory cards, it should be borne in mind that most of the more or less serious models have the so-called burst buffer . Technically, this is a built-in volatile memory that takes on photos, and only then they are written to a memory card.

    To avoid high speed load, we recommend taking a card no lower than 10 class . Delkin Devices Power SDXC Memory Card

    256GB 2000X UHS-II Class 10 [DDSDG2000256] In stock
    40560 Y

    6990 Y

    MicroSDXC 128Gb Transcend TS128GUSD500S In stock
    6990 Y

    15990 Y

    SONY Memory Card SONY CFexpress Type A Memory Card 80 GB CEA-G CEA-G80T In stock
    15990 Y

    27990 Y

    Memory card Sony CEB-G128 CFexpress 128GB Type B out of stock
    27990 Y

    5990 Y

    SanDisk Extreme Pro SDXC UHS-I Class 3 V30 Memory Card 170/90 MB/s 128GB SDSDXXY-128G-GN4IN out of stock
    5990 Y

    27380 Y

    Delkin Devices Premium Cinema CFast 2. 0 Memory Card 128GB 560X VPG 130 [DCFSTV128] In Stock
    27380 Y


    Source: Pixel24

    How to choose a memory card for the camera?

    Imagine you had a perfect
    5 hour shoot, outdone themselves. It’s time to admire the result, and
    this is where the memory card comes in. 5 hours of work is gone! From this no one
    insured. But you can protect yourself a little. For example, choose the correct
    drive and then take good care of it. Let’s work together to find out what
    memory cards differ and how to use them.

    Types of drives

    SD (Secure Digital Memory Card)

    Suitable for most modern cameras.
    This is an ideal choice for those who use multiple cameras from different brands.

    SD has several modifications:

    • SDUC
      memory cards up to 128 GB.
    • SDHC
      storage drives up to 32 GB.
    • Cards
      with the smallest volume (up to 2 GB) are marked with the SDXC value.
    • Cards
      with Wi-Fi Eye-Fi support function (you can immediately download the frames to a PC or
      upload to the network).

    Of course, it is more convenient to purchase a card with the most
    a large amount of memory. However, such models may simply not fit the camera a little
    older. Therefore, before buying, we advise you to read the manual for the camera and
    research the issue online.


    MicroSD

    These drives may only be used
    with adapter. After all, they are smaller in size than the usual slot in the camera. From
    Pros – they are cheaper. However, the first type is considered more reliable, although large
    there is no difference in parameters.


    CF (Compact Flash)

    These cards fit some
    semi-professional and top models, which provide a special
    slot. They are distinguished by a large amount of memory and fast recording. However, in order to
    use all the functionality of the card, the camera should be able to directly
    memory access.

    Memory Stick Micro

    These drives are suitable for cameras, gaming
    set-top boxes and smartphones of the Sony brand.

    However, many of the manufacturer’s cameras support
    and conventional card formats. What is the advantage of Sony drives?
    It’s hard to say. Their cost is higher, you can only use with Sony. But sometimes
    there is simply no other way out.

    Card marking
    memory

    As in any other technology, numbers and
    the letters on the case tell about the characteristics of the drive.

    Class

    Number in the center of the letter C (Class)
    talks about write speed. There are 4 types: 2, 4, 6, 10. Numbers
    means the number of megabytes per second.

    UHS (Ultra High Speed)

    This is the next baud rate class
    data. Designated by the number in the letter U . As in the previous class, the numbers
    reflect speed.

    There are three types: 1 (10 megabytes per
    second), 2 (20), 3 (30). If the camera supports UHS,
    then the photographer will not know the problems with serial recording
    and 4K shooting.

    UHS bus types (drive and
    communication method)

    Roman numerals I, II and III indicate
    the number of rows of contacts. The more there are, the higher
    performance. But it all makes sense if the camera supports II formats
    or III. Otherwise, you will be wasting your money.

    Reading speed

    This indicator affects the speed
    transfer data from the drive to the PC. On the case, the speed is reflected in megabytes
    per second.
    In addition, there is another value (number and letter X), which also reflects
    maximum reading speed.

    Memory size

    Everything is simple here, the memory is marked
    gigabytes or terabytes.

    Video recording class

    This refers to the video recording speed.
    It is denoted by the letter V and a number. For example, V6 writes data with minimal
    speed of 6 Mb/s in HD quality. V10 allows you to shoot videos in
    FullHD quality, 4K quality is available from the V30 format, and 4K quality is available from the V60 class
    Shooting is possible in 8K.

    Recommendations for
    choice of memory cards

    Give preference to class C10 cards.
    Yes, more expensive, but better quality and more reliable.

    The most reliable and durable types
    drives – SD and CF. Choose them and you won’t go wrong. What if the camera
    can write on two cards at once, buy both options and
    use at the same time. So your work will be safe.

    In terms of volume, professional
    photographers prefer to use multiple drives with little memory.

    Recommendations for
    use of memory cards

    The less often you remove the memory card, the
    contacts will last longer. Therefore, it is better to transfer data through the camera.

    Do not pull the drive out of the chamber before
    how to turn it off. In principle, you should not interact with the camera in
    moment of data transmission.

    To avoid accidents with
    information, use the LOCK function when transferring data.

    Remove and insert the card carefully.