Keyboard on amazon: Amazon Best Sellers: Best Computer Keyboards

Best keyboard deals for Amazon Prime Day, July 12

Deal

The best deals on mechanical and gaming keyboards are underway and we’ve got ’em right here.

By Michael Crider

Staff Writer, PCWorld Jul 11, 2023 1:15 am PDT

Image: Rob Schultz/IDG

It’s safe to say that PC fans are living in the golden age of keyboards. Since mechanical designs came back into fashion we’re awash in an incredible variety of styles, capabilities, customization options, and price points. And naturally, Amazon’s smorgasbord of deals on Prime Day will have more than a few of them available at steep discounts. Most of these will require an Amazon Prime account (which you can get free for 30 days if you don’t have it already), but competitors like Best Buy will join in the bargains, too.

Retailers all over the web, Amazon included, are already offering up discounts for Prime Day(s), running between July 11 and 12. Here are the best deals we’ve been able to find from all over, handily separated into standard and gaming mechanical models, as well as a selection of other boards. You should also check out our overall top picks for mechanical keyboards and PC gaming keyboards.

Prime Day mechanical keyboard deals 

  • Havit KB487L, compact design with num pad and PBT keycaps, $345.39 (31% off at Amazon)
  • Keychron V1, 75% layout with hot-swap switches, PGBT keycaps, VIA programming, $79.99 (20% off at Amazon)
  • DROP CTRL keyboard, tenkeyless RGB with hot-swap sockets and metal frame, $192.00 (20% off at Amazon)
  • Keychron K7, 65% low-profile Bluetooth board, RGB three switch choices, $75.20 (20% off at Amazon)
  • Epomaker EK68, 65% with knob, RGB, PBT keycaps, gasket build, 2.4GHz and Bluetooth, $71.99 (20% off at Amazon)
  • Cherry MX 1.0 TKL, basic wired design with red switches and white backlight, $32.99 (60% off at Newegg)
  • Zuoya GMK67, barebones kit, includes Bluetooth and 2.4GHz, gasket mounting $36 (55% off at What Geek, use coupon code24WG24″)

As usual, Keychron sits right at the top of our recommendations, with discounts offered throughout their line. DROP’s CTRL board is a good starting point if you want a premium, ultra-customizable design, while Epomaker offers much of the same features at a much lower price. Cherry’s MX 1.0 is a good choice if you just need a basic, all-around quality mechanical board.

Prime Day gaming keyboard deals

  • Asus ROG Falchion, wireless 65% travel board with dedicated dongle, toch volume, protective case, and speedy switches, $93.49 (38% off at Amazon)
  • Corsair K70 RGB Pro, Cherry switches, 8KHz wired polling, magnetic wrist-rest, $119.99 (29% off at Amazon)
  • Redragon K631, 65% layout, wired, RGB lighting, hot-swap, $33.59 (20% off at Amazon)
  • Logitech G Pro X, high-end TKL board with RGB lighting, $71.90 (45% off at Amazon)
  • SteelSeries Apex Pro TKL , adjustable actuation keys with OLED screen and PBT caps, $131.99 (30% off at Amazon)
  • Corsair K100 RGB, full-sized with extra macro keys, optical switches, PBT keycaps and wrist rest, $184. 99 (26% off at Amazon)
  • Razer BlackWidow V3 Mini Hyperspeed, 65% layout with RGB lighting and dongle/Bluetooth connection, $94.99 (52% off at Best Buy)

There are tons of gaming boards to choose from, but for my money, I’d go for the SteelSeries Apex Pro with its adjustable keys on the high end, or Redragon’s diminutive Fizz on the low end. For a tiny travel board, Rzer’s Blackwidow V3 Mini is unlikely to get cheaper any time soon, with the Asus Falchion being a solid alternative if you like a little protection (and don’t need Bluetooth).

Prime Day deals on other keyboards 

  • Logitech KM470 Slim Wireless Keyboard and Mouse Combo, compact num pad layout, $30.99 (38% off at Amazon)
  • Redragon K585 Gaming Keypad, a great option for left-hand only gaming if you like typing on something else, $29.59 (50% off at Amazon)
  • Anker travel Bluetooth keyboard, ultra-slim design for tablets, $9. 69 (47% off at Amazon, use coupon code “ANKER2641”)
  • Microsoft Ergonomic Keyboard, full-sized design with split and curved deck, $44.99 (25% off at Best Buy)
  • Adesso Tru-Forme Media 3150 Wireless, split ergonomic with built-in trackball, $49.03 (38% off at Newegg)
  • Microsoft Designer Compact Keyboard, super-slim with Bluetooth, $39.99 (42% off at Newegg)

Those who need a split ergo design should check out the Adesso Tru-Forme, which includes a trackball right where your thumbs rest. And I personally recommend the Redragon K585 if you want separate gadgets for gaming and typing.

FAQ


1.

What kind of keyboard should I buy?

That depends on what you’re doing with it. If you have a laptop and you like typing on it, you’re good to go. But if you have a desktop, or you just don’t feel good typing for long periods of time on the keyboard you’re using now, it might be time for an upgrade. Most of the high-quality keyboards on the market are mechanical now, with big, chunky builds and long, loud key presses, because that seems to be what people prefer. But there are still slim, quiet boards available from companies like Logitech, Microsoft, and Apple.

2.

What kind of mechanical switch do I need?

Again, that comes down to what you want to do with it. There are broadly three kinds of switch: Linear (smooth from the top of the key press to the bottom), tactile (a small “bump” where the key press registers), and clicky (a loud “click” where the key press registers). These are generically color-coded to Red, Brown, and Blue switches, respectively, though that’s not universal — if you want to be sure, look for the linear, tactile, or clicky terms.

It’s all a matter of individual taste, but gamers tend to prefer linear switches, because they can be pressed and released quickly. Those who type for long stretches of time like tactile switches thanks to their finger feedback. And if you want even more feedback, along with a bit of noise, go witch a clicky switch. Just be aware that the noise might not be so well-received by other people in your home or office!

If you want to experiment with different kinds of switches without needing to buy multiple keyboards, get a board with hot-swap sockets. These let you pull out the switches and replace them with a different type. You can even mix and match the switches you put on a single board, if you have enough of them — Reds for WASD and Browns for the rest, for example.

3.

What layout keyboard should I get?

Keyboards come in a shocking variety of layouts these days, from full-sized (with the number pad on the left) to 60%, which is just the main alphanumeric section between the two CTRL keys with the Function row cut off. Tenkeyless, or TKL, is a good middle ground that doesn’t shrink any keys but chops off the number pad, and 75% preserves the function row and arrow cluster by shrinking a few of the less-used keys.

60% is great for travel keyboards, or those who don’t have a lot of space. Full-size is almost a must if you do a lot of data entry, and rely on rapidly inputting long strings of numbers. Everything else is a balancing act between space and comfort. But keep in mind, the smaller you go, the more often you’ll need to use a function key modifier — a standard 60% keyboard doesn’t have arrows or a Delete key on the main later, for example. Smaller boards include a learning curve if you’re not used to them.

4.

Should I get a wireless keyboard?

That depends on what’s important to you. If your keyboard sits in front of your desk and never moves, it’s probably not important. But if your keyboard is constantly on the go with you in a bag, or needs to connect to multiple devices over Bluetooth, wireless is the way to go. The latest boards can connect to three or four computers (or phones or tablets) easily, and last for months and months on a charge…as long as you take it easy with the backlighting.

There’s one exception: gaming. If you’re playing PC games with your keyboard, you want to use a wireless connection with low latency, and that means a dongle you plug in. Unlike some older wireless keyboards, and just like newer kinds of mice, modern wireless gaming boards have almost zero latency. That means you’ll never notice a gap between when you press a button and when your character reacts on screen. Just don’t use Bluetooth (even if it’s an option), as the high latency and crowded wireless bands can cause performance issues.

5.

Do I need a gaming keyboard?

Most of the time, no, you don’t. You can play PC games on pretty much any keyboard. Gaming keyboards offer a few nice perks, though, including fast polling rates (so even less lag time between key press and on-screen action) and custom programming tools. They also tend to be flashier, with rainbow lights and exotic case materials…not that any of that will really make a difference to how you play.

Again, if you want a wireless keyboard that’s also good for gaming, look for a gaming-specific model that uses a dedicated wireless dongle and not Bluetooth.

Author: Michael Crider, Staff Writer

Michael is a former graphic designer who’s been building and tweaking desktop computers for longer than he cares to admit. His interests include folk music, football, science fiction, and salsa verde, in no particular order.

16 Best Keyboards 2021 | The Strategist

16 Best Keyboards 2021 | The Strategist

Every product is independently selected by (obsessive) editors. Things you buy through our links may earn us a commission.

As a tech writer for the Strategist, Jordan Bowman covers everything from headphones to speakers to computers (and also happens to be interested in menswear and photography).

As a tech writer for the Strategist, Jordan Bowman covers everything from headphones to speakers to computers (and also happens to be interested in menswear and photography).

Photo-Illustration: The Strategist; Photos: Retailers

Here at the Strategist, we know that finding the “best” product really depends on exactly whom you ask — which is why we’ve devoted this series to squeezing in as many informed, trustworthy opinions as possible. And we’ve come up with dozens of ways to do this, among them: surfacing reader reviews from across the internet, taking quick polls of our most shopping-obsessed friends and Strategist editors, and partaking in some advanced internet snooping.

Here, we’ve rounded up the best keyboards you can buy online, according to everyday people, professional video editors, gamers, YouTube stars, TikTokers, Twitch streamers, and computer-repair experts. We have a wired keyboard if the thought of connecting another Bluetooth device makes you want to chuck your computer across the planet; mechanical keyboards for anyone who loves how the satisfying clickety-clack of the keys makes you feel like a hacker from an ’80s sci-fi movie; a $13 keyboard that a developer swears by; and options for nearly everyone else. There’s even the perfect keyboard for your iPad.

Logitech Craft Advanced Wireless Keyboard

$200 now 15% off

$170

Five experts we spoke to recommend Logitech’s keyboards, specifically the Craft Advanced. It’s a full keyboard with space for arrow keys and a side numeric pad, but what makes it most unique is the crown — a dial at the top of the keyboard that allows you to quickly scroll up and down a page. Sara Dietschy, a YouTuber and video creator, says, “If you’re in Excel spreadsheets, it’s easy to scroll around. And for me, with video editing, I’ve assigned that wheel to making the video timeline bigger and smaller.” Matt Workman, a cinematographer who has worked on music videos for Justin Bieber, 50 Cent, and Diddy, also enjoys the wheel. “You can spin to scroll down a page or map it to whatever you want. It just gives you tactile control,” he says. Plus, “The travel on the keys is nice and pretty quiet.”

$170

at Logitech

Buy

$200

at B&H Photo and Video

Buy

Keychron Q1

$179

Marques Brownlee, creator of MKBHD, one of the most popular tech-review shows on YouTube, tweeted about his new favorite keyboard from Keychron: “The metal board. The layout. The switches. The sound. Everything about it is *chef’s kiss*. ” The Q1 replaced his previous favorite, the Keychron K2. Both keyboards are wireless with arrow keys, no number pad, and backlighting. And both are Mac compatible. The Q1 is slightly larger, so it will take up more space on your desk, but it also has a better overall feel with smoother typing.

$179

at Keychron

Buy

AmazonBasics Matte Black Wired Keyboard

$17

“I’ve been using the same Amazon Basics keyboard for ~5 years and only recently bought a new one because a single key started to die out,” says developer Nick Janetakis on his blog. He was initially searching for something quiet, with keys that “have a decent amount of resistance to them so you can definitely feel each key press, but it’s not so much that it hurts your forearms after long hours of coding,” he says. After using ten different keyboards over the years, Janetakis says he can’t think of one that he prefers more than the Amazon Basics keyboard. “Although the keyboard is cheap in price, I haven’t found another keyboard that I liked as much as this one at any price point.”

$17

at Amazon

Buy

$17

at Amazon

Buy

Razer Huntsman Elite Gaming Keyboard

$240

When a Reddit user asked for recommendations for a quiet and not-too-expensive gaming keyboard, the conversation quickly led to multiple threaded battles about the annoying sound of mechanical keyboards or the uselessness of quiet keyboards. But thankfully, one person took the time to thoughtfully answer the question: “I really like my Razer Huntsman a lot. It’s one of the most consistent keyboards I’ve ever used. Quiet while not being too quiet, in a very satisfying way,” they said. They added that the point in travel for the keystrokes was extremely consistent across all the keys.

$240

at Amazon

Buy

Logitech MX Keys Advanced Wireless Illuminated Keyboard

$120 now 13% off

$105

“This is my daily driver and the one I am using right now to type this message,” says Miguel Melendez, a PC expert at B&H. “As somebody who types all day, every day, I absolutely love this keyboard. The tactile feedback is great without being too noisy, and the backlit keys are great for those who like to work in a darker environment.” He also likes that you can pair the keyboard with up to three devices. “It’s a great feature for those who are between their PC/Mac/smartphone/tablet,” he says.

$105

at Amazon

Buy

The K380 is a compact keyboard that I’ve used for almost a year. I bought it after testing out keyboards at my previous job. I was drawn to its compact form and how it can easily connect to as many as three different devices, which means I can quickly switch from typing on my iPad to my laptop. It has a slim profile and you can easily slip it into a bag, in case you want to work in another location for a little while. The curved keys are completely quiet but they still feel responsive, and I’ve never had major issues with the Bluetooth connection. It takes two AAA batteries that can last up to two years.

$30

at Office Depot

Buy

“I’ve been using the Surface keyboard and mouse for months now, and it’s so comfortable to use that I completely forgot about my struggle to find the perfect desktop keyboard and mouse,” writes Verge senior editor Tom Warren. “Microsoft has improved the key spacing,” he says, making the keyboard wider and more comfortable to navigate.

After hearing how much people loved the extra space of the Logitech Craft (the first keyboard in this list), I decided to look for something that was a bit more spacious than my budget K830. I looked around Reddit at first, and one thread led me down a mechanical-keyboard tunnel where people were showing off keycaps that looked like Pokémon characters or Baby Yoda. I’d clearly dived deeper than I wanted to, so I headed to Amazon. After some clicking and skimming, I settled on the Logitech K780. Unlike my keyboard, it has a dedicated number pad. It can still connect to up to three devices, and it has a sweet little white gutter that is perfect for holding your tablet, smartphone, or just a pen. Once my K830 gives out on me, this will be my next keyboard.

Apple Magic Keyboard With Numeric Keyboard

$129 now 11% off

$115

Tyler Stalman, a photographer and podcaster, has tried many keyboards but “always comes back to the Magic Keyboard,” he says. “The angle of my wrist feels right,” making it less tiring to type. He also says that “the way that the keys press down and bounce back is very responsive.” Responsiveness was one of the most important factors among the experts we consulted. If your keyboard feels like you’re typing on a slab of stone, then you’re in trouble. The keys need to spring back and release that sweet clicky hit of dopamine. And finally, he says, “Apple keyboards just really integrate well with the hardware.”

$115

at Amazon

Buy

$129

at Apple

Buy

NovelKeys NK65

$95

com/strategist/_components/clay-paragraph/instances/ckr6guc9w001l3h6edup0bpx3@published” data-word-count=”100″>The NovelKeys NK65 was recommended by four tech experts in our guide to the best mechanical keyboards. With actual springs, called switches, under each key, mechanical keyboards give you better accuracy and responsiveness (two things beloved by gamers) and an incredibly satisfying click. Alexander Medeot, a custom-keyboard builder and Twitch streamer, likes that “you can literally just plug and play with whatever switches you want.” Marcia Roberts of Apiary Keyboards, a custom-keyboard builder and Twitch streamer, calls the NovelKeys one of her favorites for its easy customizability. There’s only one problem: The NovelKeys’s popularity means it can often sell out.

$95

at NovelKeys

Buy

YUNZII SK64S Wireless Mechanical Keyboard

$118

Tiktoker DoseofTech says this 60-percent keyboard, which is called that because it’s 40 percent smaller than a full-size keyboard, is one of the best mechanical keyboards he’s ever tried. The smaller size means it takes up less space on your desk, plus it has LED RGB backlights and easily swappable switches, in case you’d like a different style of keycaps or switches in the future. It also has a Bluetooth connection, or you can plug it in if you don’t want to worry about battery life.

$118

at eBay

Buy

Keychron K3 Ultra-Slim 75-Percent Mechanical Keyboard

$85

After testing the Keychron K3, I would recommend it to anyone looking for a compact mechanical keyboard (similar to the 60 percent keyboard above, 75 percent means it’s three-quarters the size of a traditional keyboard), whether they have smaller desks or just don’t want to lose the space required for a full-size option. It has multiple kickstand levels to help you find the right level of wrist support. It also has Bluetooth functionality and RGB backlighting, and it’s compatible with both Mac and Windows. Since it’s lightweight, it’s easy to bring with you, whether you’re moving to the kitchen table or a coffee shop. (If you do take it to a coffee shop, be ready for some glares from neighbors annoyed by the loud click-clacking sound.)

$85

at Amazon

Buy

$85

at Amazon

Buy

Kinesis Freestyle2 Ergonomic Keyboard for PC (9-Inch Standard Separation)

$89

If you’re using the wrong mouse and keyboard for a prolonged period of time you can cause massive damage to your hands, wrists, and forearms. Those small movements from moving your fingers and wrists along the keyboard can lead to carpal tunnel syndrome or other chronic issues, says Dr. Scott Weiss, a physical therapist and board-certified athletic trainer. He recommends you use a split keyboard like this one. “You can control where you want both sides, according to the size of your own hands, and more importantly, adjust them to fit the width of your shoulders,” he says. “The last thing you want is to have your shoulders curled inward for extended periods of time, as that can cause many issues.”

$89

at Amazon

Buy

$89

at Amazon

Buy

OMOTON Ultra-Slim Bluetooth Keyboard

$21 now 5% off

$20

With an average rating of 4.4 and 7,452 reviews, the Omoton slim Bluetooth keyboard is a favorite among Amazon buyers. One reviewer says this keyboard made all the difference once COVID hit and their classes became online only: “It is lifted on the top side which really helps make it ergonomic for my wrists. ” Another reviewer says, “I’m incredibly pleased with this little diddy, for as little as I spent on it. I haven’t had it too long, but I’m a fast typist and I type all day, so given the past month, I think I have a good-quality product here.”

$20

at Amazon

Buy

$20

at Amazon

Buy

“Awesome set! After much research I decided to go with this keyboard-mouse combo and I couldn’t be happier. Setup is an absolute snap,” says one reviewer about the MK270. “It’s affordable and it works great so far,” says another. According to a third reviewer, this keyboard-and-mouse combo “is perfect for working from home for extended hours. The design of the keyboard is nice and very user friendly. Additional number pad on the right hand side is definitely a plus as it makes it easy to key in the numbers.

Logitech Combo Touch iPad Pro 11-Inch Keyboard Case

$200 now 6% off

$189

“The Combo Touch comes with a trackpad, backlit keys, and an adjustable kickstand,” says Jason Snell of the tech podcast Upgrade, making it perfect for all different types of users. He says the Combo Touch feels like what you might find on a standard laptop, and it’s comfortable enough to turn the iPad into a functional computer. Add an Apple Pencil, he says, and you’ve got a note-taking powerhouse. With four different viewing modes, it also works great for many different activities, including sketching, typing, watching videos, and reading.

$189

at Amazon

Buy

$200

at Target

Buy

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16 Keyboards, Vetted 16 Ways

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Amazon Fire TV

I’ve been using network media players for a long time, but I don’t have to change them often, very infrequently. The first of these devices was the Popcorn Hour A-110 on SoC from Sigma Designs, which worked for me longer than the others – just over 4 years.

Since the entire library of films, series and music is stored on my home server with a “modest” capacity of 12TB, one of the criteria was and remains trouble-free operation via the NFS protocol without prior transcoding and the possibility of direct sound output to the receiver. Popcorn met all these requirements. But time flies and technology improves. So for a long time devices I usually do not linger. No, not because I’m careless and they break (on the contrary, they pass from me in a state as if they had just been out of the box), but because the craving for new technologies is irresistible. Therefore, I wanted a replacement, and a replacement for something less voracious, more compact and less heated.

A year ago, Raspberry Pi became such a replacement for me. Tiny, low-power (powered from the TV ports for the first one and from the monitor ports for the second one), plays almost any rips (with the purchase of licenses for VC-1 and MPEG2 codecs for a modest £3. 00 GBP), with the few exceptions of complex and heavy remixes. XBMC acted as an omnivorous player with configured synchronization between two Raspberry Pis via a common MySQL database. I paused on one device and continued to look at the other, beauty and nothing more. Beautiful and at the same time terrible, this solution was also HDMI-CEC support, when control is possible from the TV remote control. It is wonderful because the number of remotes is reduced to a minimum – television and for the receiver. All buttons are quite easily reassigned to XBMC by editing the xml-config. Terrible is it with its slowness, the protocol is clearly unhurried. Who cares, but I wanted to move through the menu with greater speed.

I have been eyeing Android TV boxes for a long time, but everything that was on the market did not inspire confidence and looked frankly bad. Amazon Fire TV was introduced to the market last month, I knew right away: this is it. The quality is at a very high level, excellent selection of components, high responsiveness of the UI and a very convenient control panel. With such a remote control, it has become a pleasure to navigate through the menu.

Amazon did the right thing by allowing developers to work with the device in userspace. Although there is no root access out of the box, the ability to install in userspace on a closed and customized Amazon Android operating system is already worth a lot.

Install ADB Utility under your operating system and enable ADB Debugging on Amazon Fire TV:

  Settings  ->  System  ->  Developer Options  ->  ADB Debugging  ->  ON  

The ultimate goal is XBMC as the main media player. Let’s get started.

Look up your IP in System -> About -> Network . Connect via adb to Amazone Fire TV:

 adb connect IP 

Amazon Fire TV is locked to American time zones in its settings, you can set the time zone we need using the TimeZone Changer application. Download, unpack to the desktop, for example, and install:

 cd ~/Desktop
adb install TimeZoneChanger.apk 

Go to Settings -> Applications -> TimeZone Changer -> Launch Application . We find our time zone and set it.

In order for XBMC to start on its own when the set-top box is turned on, to start when the set-top box wakes up, so that the set-top box automatically goes to sleep after 15 seconds if you are in the menu of Amazon’s native launcher, we need to install the application Llama and set up a reaction to the necessary events. The set-top box will go into sleep mode in XBMC and other applications after 10 minutes of inactivity.

For XBMC, it is necessary to additionally set the following settings after installation:

 System -> Settings -> System -> Power saving
Shutdown function timer = 10 min
Shutdown function = Quit 

Download Llama. Unpack, install the application and copy the ready-made event settings configuration files:

 adb install com. kebab.Llama.apk
adb push Llama /sdcard/Llama/ 

Run the application and import the settings: Press the ‘ Menu ’ button on the Amazon Fire TV remote -> Import/Export Data -> Import From USB Storage -> Accept .

Now let’s proceed directly to the installation of XBMC. Download the installation package for Android (ARM). To date, the latest version of Helix is ​​14.2, and we will install it.

 adb install kodi-14.2-Helix-armeabi-v7a.apk 

We perform the first launch to create the necessary directory and file structure in the user partition. Now let’s make at least Remap buttons for the native console. Remapped buttons in bold:

remote.xml :

 

    
        
            PageUp
            PageDown
            XBMC.ActivateWindow(Home)
        
    
    
        
            XBMC. ActivateWindow(favourites)
        
    
    
        
            SmallStepBack
            Stop
            AudioNextLanguage
            ShowSubtitles
            SkipPrevious
            SkipNext
            Pause
        
    
 

Save to a file and transfer to the device:

 adb push remote.xml /sdcard/android/data/org.xbmc.kodi/files/.kodi/userdata/keymaps 

Further to taste, for example, I need synchronize the base between multiple devices with XBMC (XBMC versions must be the same).

On the MySQL server machine execute (in the example 192.168.1.2):

 GRANT ALL ON `MyVideos%`.* TO 'xbmc'@'%' IDENTIFIED BY 'password';
GRANT ALL ON `MyMusic%`.* TO 'xbmc'@'%' IDENTIFIED BY 'password'; 

For XBMC create advancedsettings. xml :

 

    mysql
        192.168.1.2
        3306
        xbmc
        password
    
    
        mysql
        192.168.1.2
        3306
        xbmc
        password
    
    true
        true
    
 

Send to device:

 adb push advancedsettings.xml /sdcard/android/data/org.xbmc.kodi/files/.kodi/userdata 

resources, you can easily transfer them, they are stored in the file sources.xml .

For example, the file structure is:

 
    
        
    
    
    
        
        
            Music
            upnp://4e913d96-195a-306e-2d72-b5a52490dc52/1%243/
            true
        
    
    
        
    
    
        
    
 

To transfer directly to the device:

 adb push sources.xml /sdcard/android/data/org.xbmc.kodi/files/.kodi/userdata 

In conclusion, a little about updating XBMC, for this we simply download the new version and execute (using 14.3 as an example):

 adb install -r kodi-14.3-Helix-armeabi-v7a.apk 

On this you can disconnect from the device:

 adb disconnect 

Added (06/23/2014):

As a supporter of minimalism, I decided to simplify the work with the device as much as possible, reducing the number of manipulations as much as possible. Since we have to use XBMC most of the time, we will use it as the main launcher.

Downloading a new configuration file for Llama. We unpack, install and configure according to the previously given scheme.

Now, every time you press the ‘Home’ and ‘Mic’ keys, XBMC will be launched, there will be no access to the standard launcher. XBMC allows you to run Android applications. For convenience, from the program menu, add the necessary applications to favorites.

 Programs -> Android Apps -> on the app to be added press the ‘Menu’ button -> Set as Favorite 

I slightly updated the Remap buttons in the post, who used the old settings – pay attention to this. Now the ‘Menu’ button calls up favorites, and the ‘Play / pause’ button in the main menu of the program in one click allows you to get to the home screen.

Sooner or later, of course, you will need access to a native launcher to buy games, for example, or other content from the Amazon Appstore. We go into the Llama settings and turn off the ‘Run XBMC’ rule, then, as usual, by clicking the ‘Home’ button, we go to the native launcher. Once you’re done, you can re-enable the rule.

Anticipating the question about root, yes, not so long ago a universal root exploit for fresh versions of Android was released, which is applicable to Amazon Fire TV, but as long as the bootloader is closed, I consider its use premature. First of all, we need a working software mechanism for restoring the device in case of errors and damage during experiments. I doubt that there will be many who want to do this with JTAG. So for now, the Llama trick is my choice. Simple and tasteful.

Added (07/03/2014):

There is a way to enter Recovery Mode on Amazon Fire TV, now you can get root, and in case of problems, do a Factory Reset (unless you manage to kill bootloaders of course).

First, how to enter recovery mode. To do this, we need a USB keyboard with buttons ‘ Print Screen ’ or ‘ SysRq ’. I think any PC’s will do, but a Mac keyboard is definitely in the span. Connect the keyboard, then turn off the power to the set-top box. Turn on the power and during the download and start showing the amazon fireTV logo with a colored animation around it, press the key combination ‘ Alt + Print Screen + i ‘, this will send the command ‘ kill all tasks ‘. After the first command is sent, the set-top box will reboot, you need to press the above key combination again during boot, and so on until (it may take 3 to 5 reboots) until the set-top box displays the message ‘ The System Update was not successful ’. This will mean that the set-top box has entered recovery mode. Once you have entered this mode, press the ‘ Home 9 button0022 ‘ on your keyboard, this will bring up the menu. Using the arrow keys, select ‘ Wipe data/factory reset ’ and press the button ‘ Enter ’.

Now let’s move on to getting root access and as a goal to assign XBMC as the main launcher without the crutch in the form of Llama. At this point, Llama should remove or disable the rules for XBMC.

Download the archive, unpack it and execute it sequentially:

 adb install tr.apk 

Launch the ‘Towelroot’ application and click ‘Make it Ra1n’. Exit the application and wait a bit, your set-top box will reboot. Now let’s install SU on the system and a companion application to manage access rights for the superuser:

 adb install Superuser.apk 

Run ‘Superuser’ and install SU in normal mode. To check, for example, let’s perform an important action, turn off auto-update of the system:

 adb shell
su
pm disable com.amazon.dcp 

Typing ‘su’ will prompt for privilege escalation, grant it. After entering the last command, if successful, ‘Package com.amazon.dcp new state: disabled’ will be displayed.

Now let’s install Xposed Framework, modules for our set-top box, Settings, MoreLocale and XBMC Launcher.

 adb install de.robv.android.xposed.installer_v32_de4f0d. apk
adb install RboxFireTvMods_1.3.apk
adb install HDXPosed-1.3.apk
adb install Settings.apk
adb install jp.co.c_lis.ccl.morelocale.apk
adb install se.blunden.xbmclauncher.apk 

Run ‘Xposed Installer -> Framework -> Install/Update -> Allow Reboot’. After reboot, run ‘Xposed Installer -> Modules -> activate RboxFireTvMods and HDXPosed again (it won’t work without a mouse)’. Now you need to reboot, either distort the power, or hold down the ‘Select’ and ‘Play / pause’ keys, this will send the command to reboot. If you are more familiar with the terminal, then you can do it through it:

 adb shell
su
reboot 

Now XBMC will work as the main launcher.

To make the set-top box go to sleep when XBMC is active, install the Android Power Options screensaver add-on (xbmc.repo.elmerohueso-1.0.zip). Set, disable power saving mode (exit their XBMC after 10 minutes of inactivity), if it was previously enabled. Now go to ‘XBMC Settings -> Appearance -> Screensaver’ and select the newly installed screensaver. Go to screensaver settings, click on ‘Check SU Permissions’ and grant XBMC superuser rights. Select the interval at which the screensaver will turn on. That’s all, now when inactive, the set-top box will go to sleep after the selected time interval.

Added (07/07/2014):

Modified the original keyboard by adding the Russian layout. Now the device can be used more fully.

Download Russian keyboard for Amazon Fire TV. Unpack and install (requires root):

 adb push BuellerIME.apk /sdcard/
adb shell
su
mount -o rw,remount /dev/block/platform/msm_sdcc.1/by-name/system /system
cp /sdcard/BuellerIME.apk /system/app
mount -o ro,remount /dev/block/platform/msm_sdcc.1/by-name/system /system
rm /sdcard/BuellerIME.apk
reboot 

Enjoy Russian input.

Added (07/11/2014):

In the latest versions of the system firmware, the keyboard is deodexed, but in firmware earlier than 51.1.1.0 it was deodexed. If you have an old firmware and after replacing the keyboard with a modified one it stopped working, then you just need to delete ‘BuellerIME.odex’.

 adb shell
su
mount -o rw,remount /dev/block/platform/msm_sdcc.1/by-name/system /system
rm /system/app/BuellerIME.odex
mount -o ro,remount /dev/block/platform/msm_sdcc.1/by-name/system /system
reboot 

After that, the keyboard should work without any problems.

Added (03/29/2015):

I made a Russian keyboard for the latest firmware (51.1.5.0_515020820):

Download Russian keyboard for Amazon Fire TV (51.1.5.0_515020820). Unpack and install (requires root):

 adb push FireTVIME.apk /sdcard/
adb shell
su
mount -o rw,remount /dev/block/platform/msm_sdcc.1/by-name/system /system
cp /sdcard/FireTVIME.apk /system/app
mount -o ro,remount /dev/block/platform/msm_sdcc.1/by-name/system /system
rm /sdcard/FireTVIME.apk
reboot 

Added (04/03/2015):

I came across a good launcher in the style of Google TV – HALauncher. It is possible to manually sort, hide and show the necessary applications. With taste and nothing more. I translated it into Russian and set a more suitable color scheme. This is how it looks:

Download HALauncher-RU. Unpack and install:

 adb install halauncher-android-tv-1.0.11.0-en-ZeroLab.NeT.apk 

In the settings we set:

 Main background:
FF 000000
Menu column color:
FF 12171B 

Enjoy.

Amazon

Fire TV

Gadgets

Amazon DeepComposer, the first artificial intelligence music keyboard

Amazon introduced what they say is the world’s first keyboard using machine l earn. Its name is Amazon DeepComposer , introduced it on the occasion of AWS re:Invent 2019, and the truth is that the idea is frankly attractive.

Playing a musical instrument has many benefits. It’s a proven fact and that’s why it’s always been one of my biggest problems. The problem is that I never manage to devote enough time to any of them to get further than Do Re Mi. But now I came across this Amazon AI Music Keyboard that it will even be able to compose melodies by itself. And of course, now I want it.

Amazon DeepComposer is a 32-key musical keyboard with PC connectivity. So far, we can say that there is nothing new, since there are already many such keyboards. The big difference lies in leveraging the power of the cloud and machine learning.

Using AI and Amazon services, you can play a melody or simple chords with it and then let its software do the rest. That is, analyze everything and create your own impromptu composition. Okay, this piece won’t win any music awards, but it’s a fun way to introduce a lot of developers to all things machine learning.

The AI ​​that this DeepComposer uses is capable of generating various musical styles, from classical to jazz, rock and pop. For this, there is a neural network that generates and analyzes what is created for the final creation of a work, and there is also important previous work based on the analysis of a large amount of data that has served as training in various genres.

Those who were able to try confirm the above. This AI will not win any prizes at this time. Moreover, compositions may not even be classified as a piece of music. However, for developers who want to go deeper into the whole topic machine Learning
yes, it is very attractive and interesting. And no, you don’t need prior musical knowledge.

Everything is already changing for the user. It’s true that it has its own appeal, and it also provides value when it comes to understanding how all this AI works.