Best 60 inch tv under 1000: The 4 Best TVs Under $1,000 – Summer 2023: Reviews

The 4 Best TVs Under $1,000 – Summer 2023: Reviews

  1. Table of Contents
  2. Intro
  3. Best TV

    1. Best Mid-Range

      1. Best Budget

        1. Best Cheap

          1. Notable Mentions
          2. Recent Updates
          3. All Reviews
          4. Discussions

          Updated Jul 18, 2023 at 12:45 pm

          By Pierre-Olivier Jourdenais

          You can find a wide selection of TVs below $1,000. More and more high-end TVs are available for under $1,000, and even though you can usually only find some smaller models for this price if you want the best performance, a few good larger models are available with worse picture quality. Some companies make low-cost TVs with good value, so getting one is usually a safe bet. Also, TVs tend to drop in price a few months after release, so getting an older model is a great way to find a TV in this price range.

          We’ve bought and tested more than 390 TVs, and below are our recommendations for the best TVs under $1,000. See our picks for the best TVs, the best TVs under $500, and the best TVs under $1,500 for more options. Most brands have started releasing their 2023 lineups, so vote on which ones you want us to buy and test. To learn more about the 2023 models, check out our 2023 TV lineup page.

          1. Best TV Under $1,000

            LG OLED42C2PUA

            Searching

            Finding Store

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            Mixed Usage

            8.8

            TV Shows

            8.4

            Sports

            8.6

            Video Games

            9.3

            HDR Movies

            8.8

            HDR Gaming

            9. 0

            PC Monitor

            9.3

            Type

            OLED

            Sub-Type

            WOLED

            Resolution

            4k

            See all our test results

            The best 4k TV under $1,000 we’ve tested is the LG OLED42C2PUA. It’s a remarkable TV that delivers incredible picture quality, much better than any other TV in this price range. It’s an excellent TV that looks remarkable in dark rooms thanks to its near-infinite contrast ratio. It has perfect black levels without any blooming around bright objects, making it an ideal choice for watching movies in a dark environment.

            It’s also a fantastic TV for gaming thanks to its near-instantaneous response time, resulting in crystal clear motion with no motion blur around fast-moving objects. It has low input lag and a great selection of gaming features, including HDMI 2.1 bandwidth, meaning you can game at 4k @ 120Hz with the latest consoles or PCs.

            Unfortunately, it’s a bit pricey, so you can only get the 42-inch or 48-inch models within this price range. If you want something bigger, the step-down LG B2 OLED is the best 55-inch TV under $1,000 and delivers similar picture quality. The downside here is that the B2 only has two HDMI 2.1 bandwidth ports as opposed to the four HDMI 2.1 ports on the C2, but this is only an issue if you want to connect multiple HDMI 2.1 devices.

            See our review

          2. Best Mid-Range TV Under $1,000

            Hisense U8H

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            Mixed Usage

            8.3

            TV Shows

            7.7

            Sports

            8. 2

            Video Games

            9.0

            HDR Movies

            8.3

            HDR Gaming

            9.0

            PC Monitor

            8.7

            Type

            LED

            Sub-Type

            VA

            Resolution

            4k

            Sizes
            55″ 65″ 75″

            See all our test results

            If you prefer something cheaper or don’t need the best of the best, consider the Hisense U8H. It doesn’t deliver the same perfect blacks as the LG C2 OLED, but that’s the trade-off for getting something cheaper. Instead, it’s available in bigger sizes in this price range, making it the best 65-inch TV under $1,000. It’s an excellent TV as it gets very bright, making it an ideal choice for use in bright rooms, and it makes highlights pop in HDR. It even has a high contrast ratio if you want to use it in the dark, with minimal blooming or black crush in dark scenes.

            It runs the user-friendly Google TV interface, and the mic built into the remote gives you access to Google Assistant to work with other smart devices in your house. It also has a good selection of inputs, like two HDMI 2.1 ports, and it supports eARC if you want to connect a compatible soundbar or receiver and pass high-quality audio to it.

            See our review

          3. Best Budget TV Under $1,000

            TCL 5 Series/S555 2022 QLED

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            Mixed Usage

            7.6

            TV Shows

            6.9

            Sports

            7. 1

            Video Games

            8.1

            HDR Movies

            7.8

            HDR Gaming

            8.2

            PC Monitor

            8.1

            Type

            LED

            Sub-Type

            VA

            Resolution

            4k

            Sizes
            50″ 55″ 65″ 75″

            See all our test results

            If you’re on a tighter budget or want something even bigger than the 65-inch Hisense U8H, check out the TCL 5 Series/S555 2022 QLED instead, which is available up to 75 inches for under $1,000. As it’s a budget TV, its overall picture quality isn’t as good as the Hisense because there’s more blooming around bright objects, but it’s still a good TV that displays deep blacks in dark rooms. It also gets bright enough to fight glare if you want to use it in a bright room and has decent reflection handling.

            TVs in the budget category tend to have fewer features than higher-end models, and that’s the case here. It doesn’t have HDMI 2.1 bandwidth like the Hisense, meaning it can’t take full advantage of gaming consoles, but it still has variable refresh rate (VRR) support to reduce screen tearing. It also has eARC support if you want to connect a soundbar or receiver, but it only supports Dolby formats over eARC.

            See our review

          4. Best Cheap TV Under $1,000

            Hisense A6H

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            Mixed Usage

            6.3

            TV Shows

            6. 9

            Sports

            6.9

            Video Games

            6.2

            HDR Movies

            5.6

            HDR Gaming

            6.6

            PC Monitor

            7.4

            Type

            LED

            Sub-Type

            IPS

            Resolution

            4k

            Sizes
            43″ 50″ 55″ 65″ 70″ 75″

            See all our test results

            If you are looking for a cheap TV for under $1,000 and prefer getting something bigger for a low cost over getting something with good picture quality, consider the Hisense A6H. It’s available in a wide range of sizes, from 43 to 75 inches, so you can get the size you want. However, it doesn’t deliver the same good dark room performance as the TCL 5 Series/S555 2022 QLED because most models use an IPS panel with a low contrast ratio that makes blacks look gray in the dark. However, that means it also has a wider viewing angle, so the image remains consistent from the sides.

            It comes with Google TV built-in, which is a great smart platform that makes it easy to stream your favorite content, and its remote features a mic that you can use with Google Assistant to easily search stuff. It also supports HDR10+ and Dolby Vision formats, which is rare for most cheap TVs but has limited HDR performance due to its low peak brightness.

            See our review

          Notable Mentions

          • Hisense U6H:
            The Hisense U6H is a decent TV that’s comparable to the TCL 5 Series/S555 2022 QLED because it’s available in the same price range, but the TCL has better picture quality with higher peak brightness and better contrast. Also, the 75-inch Hisense has an IPS panel, so it has worse picture quality than the other sizes.
            See our review
          • TCL 4 Series/S455 2022:
            The TCL 4 Series/S455 2022 is a cheap TV that’s better in dark rooms than the Hisense A6H, and it’s also available in an 85-inch size, but the Hisense has better color accuracy and wider viewing angles.
            See our review
          • TCL 65QM850G:
            The TCL QM8/QM850G QLED is an extremely bright TV with an excellent contrast ratio for deep inky blacks. While its 65″ model is not quite $1,000, it’s new and will likely go on sale soon. That said, the Hisense U8H is almost as good and is significantly cheaper.
            See our review

          Recent Updates

          1. Jul 18, 2023:
            Added the TCL QM8/QM850G QLED to the Notable Mentions and refreshed the text for consistency and accuracy.

          2. May 16, 2023:
            Verified that the TVs are still available to buy for under $1,000; replaced the Samsung AU8000 with the Hisense A6H for consistency with other articles.

          3. Feb 16, 2023:
            Restructured the article with a greater focus on performance categories instead of recommending a specific size of each model.

          4. Dec 20, 2022:
            Replaced the LG C1 OLED with the LG C2 OLED and refreshed the text. Verified our other picks for accuracy and consistency.

          5. Oct 13, 2022:
            Restructured article to focus on sizes to be consistent with other articles; renamed the LG C1 to ‘Best 48-Inch TV Under $1,000’; removed the Sony A80J and the Hisense U6G because there are better options close to $1,000; added the Hisense U8H as the ‘Best 55-Inch TV’; replaced the Hisense U8G and the TCL 5 Series/S546 with the TCL 6 Series/R646 and the Samsung AU8000 in the 65-inch and 75-inch categories; updated Notable Mentions based on changes.

          All Reviews

          Our recommendations above are what we think are currently the best TVs you can get for under $1,000, including the best 65-inch TV under $1,000. We factor in the price (a cheaper TV wins over a pricier one if the difference isn’t worth it), feedback from our visitors, and availability (no TVs that are difficult to find or almost out of stock everywhere).

          If you would like to do the work of choosing yourself, here is the list of all TVs under $1,000. Be careful not to get too caught up in the details. While no TV is perfect, most TVs are great enough to please almost everyone, and the differences are often not noticeable unless you really look for them.

          6 Best TVs Under $1,000 of 2023

          Written by Michael Desjardin, John Higgins, and Alex Kane

          Updated February 14, 2023

          TVs under $1,000 are a great way for consumers to balance performance and cost. They often deliver more features than budget TVs at a price lower than premium televisions, but knowing which one to buy can be difficult. That’s why we’re constantly testing to find the best TVs under $1,000.

          Our favorite TV under $1,000 is the Hisense U8H
          (available at Amazon for $799.99)

          . A dependable bright-room TV with excellent contrast and color, it offers high-end performance and premium features at a great price.

          Credit:
          Reviewed / Tim Renzi

          The Hisense U8H offers great performance for a price most people can justify.

          Best Overall

          Hisense U8H

          • Screen sizes under $1,000: 55”, 65”
          • HDR support: Dolby Vision, HDR10+, HDR10, HLG
          • Smart platform: Google TV

          The Hisense U8H is a great value, delivering an excellent picture and an impressive collection of features at a good price.

          The U8H is a mini-LED TV with quantum dots, a hardware tandem typically found in higher-end TVs. Thanks to the U8H’s use of quantum dots, colors on this TV are bold and punchy. During testing, the U8H covered 97% of the HDR color gamut (DCI-P3). At home, you can expect both SDR and HDR content to look realistically colorful.

          The U8H’s level of brightness is almost unheard of at its price range—it is bright enough for daytime viewing with both SDR or HDR content. Additionally, local dimming performance rivals higher-end competitors, but you should expect little light bloom when there are bright picture elements on dark backgrounds.

          For people with next-gen gaming systems, the U8H has a strong selection of features, with two HDMI 2.1 ports capable of 4K gaming at 120Hz (though one also serves as the TV’s eARC-enabled port), Variable Refresh Rate, Auto Low Latency Mode, and FreeSync Premium Pro. Streaming on the U8H, which has Google TV as its built-in smart platform, is fast and easy.

          There are some things about the U8H that left us a bit disappointed. While it might not be a dealbreaker for most people, Hisense’s picture processing still has some quirks, especially with upscaling sub-4K content. Also, the U8H’s off-angle performance was poor at times, too, as the picture quality decreases as you shift away from direct, head-on viewing.

          For the money, though, there are few TVs that perform at this level. The U8H is a great, value-forward TV that most people will be thrilled to own.

          See our full Hisense U8H review.

          Pros
          • Excellent contrast and color

          • Easy-to-use smart platform

          • Strong gaming support for the price

          Credit:
          Reviewed / John Higgins

          The TCL 5-Series S555 is the ideal combination of performance and value.

          Best 75-inch

          TCL 5-Series S555 (2022)

          • Screen sizes under $1,000: 50”, 55”, 65”, 75”
          • HDR support: Dolby Vision, HDR10+, HDR10, HLG
          • Smart platform: Roku

          The TCL 5-Series S555 builds on the successes of earlier 5-Series models, offering solid performance at a great value. This quantum dot TV offers vibrant colors, a bright picture, and features that will satisfy casual gamers.

          The average and peak brightness won’t match what you’ll get from more expensive mid-range TVs, but it’s one of the brightest you’ll find for the price—and there’s plenty of brightness to fight ambient light to deliver a great picture. During testing, we were also impressed by the 5-Series’ color performance, and color gamut coverage in both SDR and HDR and HDR10+ support is better than previous models.

          For gamers, the S555 features four HDMI 2.1 ports (one with eARC), Auto Low Latency Mode, and Variable Refresh Rate, including AMD FreeSync support. Game mode is an independent toggle, so you can enjoy the excellent color and contrast performance from the TCL’s Movie and Dark HDR picture modes. However, the native refresh rate is 60Hz, so 4K/120Hz gaming isn’t possible.

          We experienced some light blooming because of a limited number of dimming zones. Also, Roku is currently the only smart TV platform available, so fans of Google TV and other OS platforms may want to look at another option.

          Overall, the TCL 5-Series is a great option for anyone looking to get serious performance without breaking the bank.

          See our full TCL 5-Series S555 (2022) review.

          Cons
          • Some light bloom

          • Roku or bust


          Other TVs Under $1,000 We Tested

          TCL 6-Series R655 (2022)

          • Screen sizes under $1,000: 55”, 65”
          • HDR support: Dolby Vision, HDR10+, HDR10, HLG
          • Smart platform: Roku

          A fantastic mid-range TV, the TCL 6-Series has bright mini-LED performance and a set of features that make gamers happy. As a Roku TV, it also has our favorite smart platform out of the box.

          Whether you’re watching your favorite streaming show during the day or taking in a movie at night, the 6-Series’ picture quality is quite good—pairing deep black levels with bright highlights that reach as high as 1,300 nits during HDR content. Because it’s a quantum dot TV, colors are also well-saturated no matter the type of content. Compared to the similarly priced Hisense U8H, the 6-Series offers better picture processing, especially when it comes to upscaling content, but it covers 92% of the wide HDR color gamut, which is slightly less than our best overall pick.

          A terrific option for gamers, the 6-Series has four HDMI 2.1 ports, two of which support 4K gaming at 144Hz with Variable Refresh Rate enabled. Importantly, the TV’s dedicated eARC port is separate from the TV’s pair of gaming-optimized ports, so it can accommodate two next-gen consoles and a dedicated soundbar. Also supported are Auto Low Latency Mode and FreeSync Premium Pro.

          People who want to tweak picture and audio settings may be a bit disappointed by the 6-Series. Options include various picture presets and ways to make basic adjustments to the TV’s backlight and color temperature, but that’s about it. However, if you’re a set-it-and-forget-it type of viewer, the 6-Series will serve you well.

          If you’re hoping to save money on a gaming-ready TV that looks good right out of the box, the 6-Series is hard to beat at its price tag.

          See our full TCL 6-Series R655 (2022) review.

          Pros
          • Bright, colorful picture

          • Built-in Roku smart features

          • Class-leading gaming features

          Cons
          • Not enough A/V customization settings

          • Out-of-the-box picture is too cool

          • Chunky, ho-hum design

          Hisense U7H

          • Screen sizes: 55”, 65”, 75”
          • HDR support: Dolby Vision, HDR10+, HDR10, HLG
          • Smart platform: Google TV

          The Hisense U7H is a well-rounded TV that performs well in both bright and dark rooms, has an easy-to-use smart platform, and is a great option for gamers

          With an average ANSI picture brightness of about 650 nits in both SDR and HDR, the U7H is one of the brightest TVs at its price. Its specular highlights are even more impressive—our lab tests found small, concentrated pockets of brightness can crack 1,000 nits in HDR. The U7H’s quantum dot-enhanced colors deserve praise, too. It covers about 93% of the HDR color gamut (DCI-P3), enough volume for the TV’s colors to really pop in HDR.

          As long as the U7H is not directly in a sunbeam, it holds up quite well. While its black levels aren’t as deep as some competitors, the U7H performs well in dark rooms, thanks to its ability to get bright. Overall, its performance is suitable for both bright- and dark-viewing environments.

          Gamers on a budget should consider the U7H. Its panel features a native 120Hz refresh rate, and two of its HDMI ports support 4K gaming at 120Hz. Unfortunately, one of its 4K/120Hz-enabled ports also serves as the TV’s dedicated eARC port, which is a negative if you own two next-gen gaming consoles and an eARC-enabled soundbar. Even considering that, there’s no better gaming TV on the market today in the U7H’s price range.

          The amount of value with the U7H is remarkable, but there are some shortcomings. While testing, we experienced severe light bloom when viewed off-axis, and Hisense’s picture processing struggles to upscale sub-4K content as well as some competitors. Still, the U7H punches well above its weight and is worth considering.

          See our full Hisense U7H review.

          Pros
          • Excellent bright-room option

          • Class-leading gaming features

          • Fast, easy-to-use smart platform

          Samsung Q60B

          • Screen sizes under $1,000: 43-inch”, 50”, 55”, 60”, 65”
          • HDR support: HDR10, HDR10+, HLG
          • Smart platform: Samsung Tizen OS

          The Samsung Q60B is an all-around good pick for people upgrading an older television or those diving into 4K TV. However, people who prioritize HDR performance or next-gen gaming will want to look at different models.

          With a sleek design, the Q60B will be a beautiful addition to any living room. The panel is narrow, with slim, L-shaped feet. Setting it up is easy, too.

          The Q60B is bright enough for daytime viewing even in sunny rooms, thanks to its color-enhancing quantum dots, although it performs better in dark-room settings, pairing respectable brightness with deep black levels. Unfortunately, the Q60B doesn’t get bright enough for HDR content to really pop.

          Gamers should know that the Q60B supports Auto Low Latency Mode, but not Variable Refresh Rate. Also, it features a native refresh rate of 60Hz and lacks HDMI 2.1 support, so 4K gaming at 120fps is not possible.

          See our full Samsung Q60B review.

          Pros
          • Decent dark-room performer

          • Bright enough for casual viewing

          • Easy-to-setup design

          Cons
          • Not cut out for next-gen gaming

          • Narrow viewing angle

          • HDR performance is lacking

          Hisense U6H

          • Screen sizes under $1,000: 50”, 55”, 65”, 75”
          • HDR support: Dolby Vision, HDR10, HDR10+, HLG
          • Smart platform: Google TV

          The Hisense U6H delivers respectable picture quality that casual users will appreciate.

          It has fantastic out-of-the-box color accuracy in some of its picture modes. Not bright enough to thrive in a sun-drenched room, the U6H is good for rooms with an average amount of lighting, where it’s easier to appreciate its deep black levels and sharp contrast control. The U6H is susceptible to light bloom when bright picture elements are surrounded by darkness. The problem is even more noticeable in off-axis viewing. It also struggles to upscale sub-4K content and its subpar motion handling can be distracting.

          While it lacks high-end gaming features like 4K/120Hz support, it does support Auto Low Latency Mode and Variable Refresh Rate. Gamers who are looking for a TV that’ll last them several years into the future might want to spend a bit more on the Hisense U8H.

          See our full Hisense U6H review.

          Pros
          • Bright enough for most rooms

          • Rich, accurate color

          • Good smart platform and features

          Cons
          • Lackluster upscaling

          • Susceptible to light bloom

          • Troublesome motion handling

          How We Test TVs Under $1,000

          Credit:
          Reviewed

          Our lab is outfitted with much of the same equipment you would find at a factory that manufactures and calibrates televisions.

          The Testers

          Reviewed’s Home Theater expert, Michael Desjardin is a Senior Staff Writer and, since 2014, a member of the tech team. Michael takes picture quality seriously, but he also understands that not every TV is a good fit for everyone.

          Reviewed A/V and Electronics Senior Editor John Higgins is an Imaging Science Foundation Level III-certified calibrator. In his A/V career of more than two decades, he has written about all manner of technology, including TVs, speakers, headphones, AVRs, and gaming.

          Credit:
          Reviewed / Chris Snow

          We measure things like peak brightness, black level, hue, and so on.

          The Tests

          Reviewed’s TV testing process, honed over many years, gathers data marginal enough to satisfy curious video engineers, but it’s also relevant to the average person’s viewing experience. During the testing process, we also spend a lot of time watching and using TVs to get a feel for the at-home experience.

          What to Consider Before Buying A TV Under $1,000

          Size

          It used to be that a 50-inch TV was considered huge. These days, the average living-room TV size—in America, anyway—is 55 inches. As big screen TVs continue to get more affordable, the average TV size just keeps going up. In other words, it’s easier than ever to land a really big TV without spending oodles of cash.

          Display Type

          LED, LCD, QLED, OLED, what does it all mean and what should you be looking for in a TV under $1,000?

          LED or LCD refer to Light Emitting Diode and Liquid Crystal Display, respectively. These technologies are used together, so you may see them referred to interchangeably as LCD TVs or LED TVs. LEDs are the backlights used in LCD TVs. They shine through a layer of a semi-solid substance called “liquid crystal,” which gets its name for its ability to morph in reaction to tiny electrical volts and allow light to pass through.

          Most of the televisions in this guide are QLED TVs. Essentially, that means they are LED TVs with quantum dots. The addition of quantum dots allows the displays to produce rich colors, especially those that rely on combinations of red and green, better than LED TVs without quantum dot technology.

          OLED, or Organic Light Emitting Diode, is a different panel technology than LED/LCD. An OLED TV, which typically is more expensive than LEDs, essentially combines the backlight and display arrays, using sub-pixel strata that produce light and color individually.

          HDR support

          Most 4K TVs also feature HDR), or High Dynamic Range, which means the TV can show images that are brighter and more colorful than older model televisions without this technology. Current top HDR formats include HDR10, HDR10+, and Dolby Vision.

          More Articles You Might Enjoy

          • The Best TVs
          • The Best Soundbars Under $200
          • The Best TVs Under $500
          • How to set up surround sound audio

          Meet the testers

          Michael Desjardin

          Senior Staff Writer

          @Reviewed

          Michael Desjardin graduated from Emerson College after having studied media production and screenwriting. He specializes in tech for Reviewed, but also loves film criticism, weird ambient music, cooking, and food in general.

          See all of Michael Desjardin’s reviews

          John Higgins

          Managing Editor, Tech

          @johntmhiggins

          John is Reviewed’s Managing Editor of Tech. He is an ISF Level III-certified calibrator with bylines at ProjectorCentral, Wirecutter, IGN, Home Theater Review, T3, Sound & Vision, and Home Theater Magazine. When away from the Reviewed office, he is a sound editor for film and musician, and loves to play games with his son.

          See all of John Higgins’s reviews

          Alex Kane

          Sr. Editor, Search & Updates

          @alexjkane

          Alex Kane is a senior editor at USA Today’s Reviewed and the author of the Boss Fight Books volume on Star Wars: Knights of the Old Republic. He has written for Fangoria, PC Gamer, Polygon, Rolling Stone, StarWars.com, and Variety. He lives in west-central Illinois.

          See all of Alex Kane’s reviews

          Checking our work.

          Our team is here for one purpose: to help you buy the best stuff and love what you own. Our writers, editors, and lab technicians obsess over the products we cover to make sure you’re confident and satisfied. Have a different opinion about something we recommend? Email us and we’ll compare notes.

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