2Nd generation apple pencil: Amazon.com: Apple Pencil (2nd Generation): Pixel-Perfect Precision and Industry-Leading Low Latency, Perfect for Note-Taking, Drawing, and Signing documents. Attaches, Charges, and Pairs magnetically. : Cell Phones & Accessories

Apple Pencil vs Apple Pencil 2: Which one is best for you?

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(Image credit: Future/Apple)

When we set out writing this Apple Pencil vs Apple Pencil 2 article, we thought there’d be an obvious winner. After all, the 2 is the more expensive, more up-to-date model. But actually both styluses can be a brilliant choice for digital artists wanting to use their iPad for drawing, as they both offer sophisticated artistry features such as tilt sensitivity and pressure sensitivity, and of course, differ in price. It just depends what you need from the stylus and how much you want to spend on it.

Apple’s digital drawing offer has changed from the first generations of the iPad, and it has now evolved into one of the most compelling experiences around for digital artists. If you can afford it, the best combo is an Apple Pencil 2 with an iPad Pro. For digital drawing, you can’t really do better – as our best tablets with a stylus guide shows, in which it beats dedicated drawing tablets from the likes of Wacom. It’s that good. It could be that the original pencil (which came out in 2015) is a better shout for you. It all depends on which iPad you have as different generations are compatible with different iterations of the Apple Pencil. 

Of course, if rumours are to be believed, the Apple Pencil 3 could blow the others out of the water, with rumoured haptic feedback, touch features (like being able to sense swipes and squeezes), a real-world eye-dropper and even a potential VR use. All that might even make you want to hold out for the next gen.

For more on Apple Pencil vs Apple Pencil 2, read our Apple Pencil review and our Apple Pencil 2 review. Don’t forget to check out our best cheap Apple Pencil deals post, and if you want to check out other options, we have a useful guide to the best Apple Pencil alternatives. 

Apple Pencil vs Apple Pencil 2

There are two Apple Pencil models, the first and second generation. They’re both super popular, and both are more suited to certain iPads than the other. But at a glance, can we see if there’s clearly a ‘better’ Apple Pencil? Let’s have a look…

Apple Pencil

Connection: Bluetooth
Battery life: 12 hours

If you’re a creative of almost any stripe and have an iPad, we think you’ll be happy with the first generation of the Apple Pencil. Yes, it’s the older model, and yes, there are more features to be found in the 2, but if you’re looking for a decent stylus at a lower price point, this is a winner.

Apple Pencil 2

Connection: Bluetooth
Battery life: 12 hours

The Apple Pencil 2 is the best stylus available for iPad, and a vast improvement on the original. Magnetic charging, tap controls and a clean design make it a compelling choice for designers, and iOS tweaks mean it’s improving all the time. But it will cost you. 

Apple Pencil vs Apple Pencil 2: Price & compatibility

The Apple Pencil 2 with Adobe Fresco (Image credit: Apple)

Compare the Apple Pencil with the Apple Pencil 2 and you’ll immediately notice the difference in price. An Apple Pencil 1st gen costs £89/$99, while the Apple Pencil 2 costs £119/$129. There are hardware reasons for this, which we’ll get to later in the article. 

However, if you have an iPad already then your choice of Pencil has effectively been made for you, as each iPad is only compatible with one of the two Pencil options. The original Apple Pencil is supported by the latest 9th Gen iPad 10.2-inch (2021, plus 2020 and 2019 version too), iPad mini (2021, 2019) and iPad Air (2019) from the current line-up.

It was also supported by previous iPads, including the iPad 9.7-inch (2018), iPad Pro 12.9-inch (2017), iPad Pro 10.5-inch (2017), iPad Pro 9.7-inch (2016), and iPad Pro 12.9-inch (2015).

The Apple Pencil 2 is currently supported by the newest 4th generation iPad Air (2020) and later, the first generation 11-inch iPad Pro (2018) and later, the iPad Pro 12. 9-inch third generation (2018) and later – including the iPad Pro M1 2021 models – and the sixth-generation iPad mini (2021).

If you’re feeling a little lost with all the different names and numbers, check out our iPad generations article where we explain it in detail. Suffice to say, for now, the original Apple Pencil is the most broadly compatible stylus, and definitely the budget option. The lowest price you can pay for a new iPad together with an Apple Pencil is £438/$428 – that’s the 10.2-inch iPad plus Apple Pencil 1st gen.

To get an Apple Pencil 2 and iPad combo, you’re looking at a minimum of £868/$928 – that’s for the 11-inch iPad Pro (2021) plus Apple Pencil 2nd gen. Of course, you get a much more powerful device for that extra cost, with vastly improved screen quality, and a USB Type-C port for attaching external storage or a 4K display easily. But our point here is still that the cost consideration goes beyond the price of the stylus.

Apple Pencil vs Apple Pencil 2: Design & ergonomics

(Image credit: Apple)

The two Apple Pencils are extremely similar in design, while being different enough that you can easily tell them apart. While they’re both 8.9mm in diameter, the original Apple Pencil is completely circular, while the Apple Pencil 2 has a flat edge. 

There’s a very specific reason for this flat edge, which we’ll come onto when we talk about how the two styluses perform in use. But it does have one additional use in terms of pure physical functionality, and that’s stopping it from rolling off surfaces. The perfectly smooth and circular barrel of the original Pencil may have been aesthetically lovely, but anyone who used one probably had to pick it up off the floor more than a few times, even with the weighting system built-in to try and prevent this. Our post on how to avoid losing your Apple Pencil has proved surprisingly popular over the years.

Anyway, that’s a fairly small point in the grand scheme of things. The original Apple Pencil has a glossy plastic finish in the style of AirPods. The Pencil 2, meanwhile, has a matte finish that’s much more resistant to grease and fingerprints. It feels, more than anything, like a real wooden pencil, which makes it that much more pleasant to use.  

Elsewhere, the Pencils are similar across the board. The 8.9mm thickness of both is ergonomically optimal for most people’s hands, as is the light weight of 20.7g apiece. Some tablet styluses can be small and fiddly, but these are pretty much perfectly pitched. Though some users, particularly those who are accustomed to Wacom tablets, may prefer a thicker stylus. If that’s you, there are sleeves you can buy to make the Apple Pencil feel thicker, see our best Apple Pencil grips post for your options.

Design-wise, that pretty much sums up the differences between the two styluses, though there is one more point worth mentioning in the Apple Pencil 2’s favour – you can get it engraved for free if you buy it online from Apple directly.

Apple Pencil vs Apple Pencil 2: Performance

(Image credit: Apple)

The good news about both Apple Pencil models when it comes to drawing performance is that they’re identical, so you don’t miss out on drawing capability whichever one you go for.

Apple hasn’t confirmed the level of pressure sensitivity in either Pencil model, which is a little frustrating, but neither has ever felt lacking for finessed and nuanced artwork, so we can live with a bit of ambiguity.

They both support tilt and rotation detection while drawing, and when combined with the good pressure detection, they’re very versatile for different brush strokes and applications.

When it comes to drawing performance, both Apple Pencil models are identical

They also sample at the same rate, meaning they both have the same low-latency performance… except you do actually get guaranteed lower latency from the time you move your hand to the time you see the results on-screen when using Apple Pencil 2 with a compatible iPad Pro. But that’s because of the iPad Pro’s 120Hz screen (meaning that it refreshes the display 120 times per second), not because of anything the Apple Pencil does. Every other iPad currently sold by Apple has a 60Hz screen.

The 2017 iPad Pro models also had 120Hz screens, and worked with the original Apple Pencil, so they also offer this lower latency, but they’re not on sale anymore. If you’re buying an iPad today, every iPad that supports the original Apple Pencil will have marginally higher latency due to their screens, while the iPad Pros offer the best possible drawing experience due to this advantage alone.

The Apple Pencil 2 does actually have one technical advantage, but it’s not directly to do with drawing: it has a button. It’s not a physical button, but rather you can double-tap the flat edge with your finger. You can choose what this does by default: switch between current tool and eraser; switch between current tool and the last-used tool; show the colour palette; or nothing, if you prefer.

That’s the default, as we said, though individual apps can give you different options within the app: art studio Procreate and audio editor Ferrite both offer other handy functions you can apply there instead, that apply only within the app (see our round-up of the best iPad Pro apps for more). The original Apple Pencil has no equivalent option.

Apple Pencil vs Apple Pencil 2: Storage and charging

(Image credit: Future)

The Apple Pencil 2 definitely has the edge when it comes to storage. It attaches magnetically to the side of the iPad Pro, and connecting it this way also charges it wirelessly. It’s hard to overstate how much more usable this makes the Apple Pencil 2 than its predecessor.

Not only is it always to hand – if you’ve got your iPad within reach, you’ve got your Pencil within reach – but it tops up its charge while it’s there, ready to go at a moment’s notice. It’s so seamless, and reduces friction, helping you get straight into being creative and productive before you lose your thread.

For the Apple Pencil 1st gen, there’s no official storage solution directly on devices. It will attach magnetically to some covers, but not with a very strong grip. Apple made some iPad sleeves that include a storage section for the Pencil, which work well enough, but were very large and unwieldy overall. There are third party cases and folios too, of course, but you’ll have to see if there are any that suit you.

The original Apple Pencil is also more annoying to keep charged. It has a male Lightning connector on the end (covered with a cap that can get lost, though it stays on fairly well), which can be plugged into your iPad’s Lightning port to charge (this is also how you pair it with the iPad). The strange, long shape this forms is the very definition of inelegance, and also leaves the Pencil prone to getting knocked and snapping its connector. However, it can charge quite quickly: about 15 seconds of charge time can get you around 30 minutes of use.

The Pencil 1st gen does come with a charging adapter in the box, though: a converter, so that you can use a normal Lightning cable to charge the Pencil. As long you’re diligent about plugging it in regularly, this would be a much better way to go about it.

Apple doesn’t give battery quotes for the Pencil models, but talked of the 1st-gen version offering around 12 hours. That model has also proven to hold its charge well when not in use, which is important, since it doesn’t get charged as easily.

The 2nd-gen Apple Pencil hasn’t had any problems lasting for long drawing sessions for us, but its battery life is also less important, because it can be more easily topped up during the day simply by popping it back on the edge when you respond to emails or stop for a break.

Apple Pencil vs Apple Pencil 2: Tips

(Image credit: Apple)

Both Apple Pencil models use the same kind of tip, which is fairly hard, and taps firmly against the glass of the iPad. Depending on what kind of stylus you’re used to, you may find this a bit of an adjustment: it’s distinctly harder and louder than other models.

It’s not a problem in any way, but the difference from softer plastic tips or drawing surfaces is quite noticeable. You’d have to try one in an Apple Store to see if you majorly dislike it, but we doubt it would be a dealbreaker.

This hardness does make the tips highly durable. Don’t expect to see much, if any, sign of wear within a year or so, unless you’re trying to use it to make fire.

The 1st-gen Apple Pencil comes with a replacement tip in the box, further guaranteeing longevity from a single purchase.

The Apple Pencil 2 does not come with a replacement tip, which seems a bit cheap of Apple, but then you won’t be needing one for a long time, as we mentioned.

You can buy a replacement pack of tips from Apple: four for £19/$19.

Apple Pencil vs Apple Pencil 2: Which should you buy?

(Image credit: Apple)

When it comes down to it, the answer is simple: it’s the Apple Pencil 2. The matte finish is better suited to being handled by sweaty hands than the original, the extra ‘button’ is useful, and the magnetic attachment with wireless charging is massively superior to the plugged charging of the 1st-gen version.

However, because the actual drawing performance is on a par between them, and because of the major budget considerations around having to buy the most expensive iPad models to be able to use Apple Pencil 2, it’s not such a clear-cut choice in practice.

As is the case with any professional tool, the real answer is to buy the best one that you can afford. If you can justify the iPad Pro and Apple Pencil 2 combination, you absolutely should go for it.

But any of the other iPad models is an excellent drawing instrument too, and though the original Apple Pencil is more unwieldy to charge, it’ll still help you produce your best work, and that’s what it’s there for.

Made your decision? Here are the best Apple Pencil and Apple Pencil 2 prices in your area:

Today’s best Apple Pencil and Apple Pencil 2 deals

Apple Pencil (2nd Generation)

£126.98

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See all prices

Read more:

  • Apple Pencil vs Logitech Crayon: Which is best?
  • The best iPad deals
  • iPad Pro (M2, 2022) review

Daily design news, reviews, how-tos and more, as picked by the editors.

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Matt has been testing technology for over a decade, working in specialist Apple publications as well general technology and creative journalism. By day, you can find him covering TV, audio, smart home gear and more at T3.com, as Home Tech Editor. By night, he’s probably updating or pairing or installing some new piece of technology in the quest for the perfect setup.

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How to use Apple Pencil (1st & 2nd Generation): The ultimate guide

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(Image credit: Luke Filipowicz / iMore)

The Apple Pencil 1 or 2 has been supported by all current iPad models since the 2019 release of the iPad 9th Generation. It enables you to get more from your iPad, whether you have an entry-level iPad, the latest iPad Air, or the top-level iPad Pro.

It’s not just for artists either, unlocking the potential of the large touch screens found on the very best iPads, by allowing you to take notes or memos, or even label documents on the move. Both Apple Pencil models feature palm rejection, pressure sensitivity for dynamic line thickness, and tilt control for shading. Also, it works as a normal stylus if you simply want to avoid getting fingerprints on your screen.

To make the most of your Apple Pencil, it’s useful to know all about the little extras that it provides. Here’s our complete guide to the Apple Pencil. Whether you’re an artist, note-taker, or professional graphics editor, you’ll learn something new here.

Meet the Apple Pencil

If you’ve used a different stylus on your iPad or graphics tablet, you may find some parts of the Apple Pencil very familiar and some very different. 

It’s worth remembering there are two different versions of the Apple Pencil: Apple Pencil (1st Generation) and Apple Pencil (2nd Generation). Their names are similar, they’re both white, and they have nearly the same dimensions. However, neither are supported on all iPads.

The second-generation Apple Pencil works on most of the newer iPad models in the iPad Pro, iPad Air, and iPad mini line, whereas the base model iPad works only with the first-generation Apple Pencil.

Apple Pencil (1st Generation) works with:

  • iPad (6th generation) 
  • iPad (7th generation) 
  • iPad (8th generation) 
  • iPad (9th generation) 
  • iPad (10th generation)
  • iPad Air (3rd generation) 
  • iPad mini (5th generation) 
  • iPad Pro 9.7-inch 
  • iPad Pro 10.5-inch 
  • iPad Pro 12.9-inch (2nd generation) 
  • iPad Pro 12.9-inch (1st generation)

Apple Pencil (2nd Generation) works with:

  • iPad Air (4th generation) 
  • iPad Air (5th generation) 
  • iPad mini (6th generation) 
  • iPad Pro 12.9-inch (3rd generation) 
  • iPad Pro 12.9-inch (4th generation) 
  • iPad Pro 12.9-inch (5th generation) 
  • iPad Pro 12.9-inch (6th generation)
  • iPad Pro 11-inch (1st generation) 
  • iPad Pro 11-inch (2nd generation) 
  • iPad Pro 11-inch (3rd generation)
  • iPad Pro 11-inch (4th generation)

How to tell the difference

(Image credit: iMore)

As mentioned in our Apple Pencil (2nd Generation) review, you can typically notice the difference between the two generations of Apple Pencil pretty quickly. If you’re concerned about whether you’re selecting the correct generation Apple Pencil, the most distinguishing difference is that the 1st-generation Apple Pencil has a silver band around the top. Apple Pencil (2nd-Generation) does not.

Also, the Apple Pencil (2nd Generation) has a matte finish and one flat side, while the Apple Pencil (1st Generation) has a smooth and shiny finish, and is completely round. Further distinguishing it, the second-generation Apple Pencil has the words “Apple Pencil” written on its flat side. The first-generation Apple Pencil has a removable cap that exposes a Lightning connector to pair and charge the Pencil, while the second-generation Apple Pencil pairs and charges magnetically so doesn’t need a Lightning connector. Because of that, it’s also about half an inch shorter.

Before you get started, make sure you know which generation Apple Pencil you have. Where there are differences in the two (like pairing and charging), we’ve included sections for each generation separately.

How to pair your Apple Pencil with your iPad

Before using your Apple Pencil, you need to pair it to your iPad. The first and second-generation styluses pair differently, so make sure you know your generation before beginning.

How to pair the first-generation Apple Pencil

  1. Make sure the iPad you want to use is on and unlocked, then uncap your Pencil.
  2. Plug in your Pencil to the new iPad.
  3. When the Bluetooth Pairing Request appears, tap Pair.

How to pair the second-generation Apple Pencil

  1. Make sure the iPad you want to use is on and unlocked.
  2. Place the Apple Pencil on the wide side of the iPad Pro with the magnetic strip.
  3. Tap Pair when the Bluetooth Pairing Request appears.

Your Apple Pencil is now paired with your iPad. If you want to move your Pencil to a different iPad, follow the same steps with the new tablet.

How to check the Apple Pencil battery level

The Apple Pencil doesn’t have a LED light or physical charging indicator on its body, so you need to check its current battery life via your currently-paired iPad.

How to check your Apple Pencil (first generation) battery level

  1. Swipe down from the iPad’s top bezel to invoke Notification Center (or turn the iPad on to view the Lock screen).
  2. Swipe right to see the Widgets screen.
  3. View the Batteries section.
  1. If you don’t see the Batteries section, you may first need to tap Edit at the bottom of the Widgets area and tap the green Plus button next to Batteries to add it as an active widget.

How to check the Apple Pencil (second generation) battery level

(Image credit: Joseph Keller / iMore)

With the second-generation Apple Pencil, it’s even easier to check the battery life. It’s possible to still follow the same steps for the first-generation Apple Pencil, but you can also simply place the stylus on the magnetic charging strip on your iPad. From there, you’ll see a notification pop up and tell you the current battery percentage.

How to charge Apple Pencil

You’ll see a charging warning when your Apple Pencil drops to 20%, 10%, and 5%, respectively. It’s also possible to check the current battery status at any point by bringing up the Notification Center.

The first and second-generation Apple Pencil charge differently, so make sure you know your generation before reading on.

How to charge the first-generation Apple Pencil 

(Image credit: Luke Filipowicz / iMore)

  1. Remove the cap from your Apple Pencil. If you’re worried about losing the cap during the charging process, you can magnetically attach it to the iPad next to the Home button.
  2. Insert your Apple Pencil’s Lightning connector into your iPad or iPad Pro’s Lightning port.

How to charge the first-generation Apple Pencil using the Lightning adapter

  1. Remove the cap from the back of your Apple Pencil.
  2. Insert your Apple Pencil’s Lightning connector into the Lightning adapter.
  3. Plug the Lightning adapter into your Lightning cable.

How to charge the second-generation Apple Pencil

(Image credit: Luke Filipowicz / iMore)

For the second-generation Apple Pencil, Apple made it much easier to charge. There’s only one way.

All you have to do is place the Apple Pencil on the side of the iPad that has the magnetic strip.

The Apple Pencil’s quick-charge technology provides users up to 30 minutes of use after a 15-second charge, but we generally recommend charging your Pencil for at least 5-10 minutes — especially if it’s under 20% — to avoid having to constantly recharge.

How to unpair your Apple Pencil from your iPad

If you pair your Apple Pencil with a different iPad, it will automatically unpair from the original tablet. That also applies if you pair a different Apple Pencil with your iPad. If you need to manually unpair, the process is still fairly simple.

  1. Launch the Settings app from your iPad’s Home screen.
  2. Tap Bluetooth.
  3. Tap the Info button to the right of Apple Pencil under My Devices.
  4. Tap on Forget.

If you want to re-pair the first-generation Apple Pencil, plug it back into the Lightning port on your iPad. If you wish to re-pair the second-generation Apple Pencil, you just need to place it back on the magnetic charging strip.

There’s no need to work through complicated per-app pairing or initiate specific settings to use the Apple Pencil on any app. Once paired, you’re ready to draw, write, sketch, or navigate in any app you want. Just place the Pencil’s pen nib to the iPad’s screen and you’re good to go.

The Apple Pencil doesn’t have an eraser

The Apple Pencil doesn’t have an eraser nib like Wacom’s patented styluses do. All your primary interactions with the iPad’s screen come through the Pencil’s white nib on the first-generation Apple Pencil, and with the white nib or a double-tap on the flat side of the second-generation Apple Pencil.

Either Apple Pencil still has a few tricks up its sleeves, though. It’s completely pressure and tilt-sensitive, so you can press harder against the screen to draw a thicker line or you can tilt your Pencil against the screen to virtually “shade” in a sketch or draw calligraphic letters.

Some apps, like Astropad Studio, even offer special combination Pencil-and-touch gestures that have the same uses as function buttons.

How to change functions on the second-generation Apple Pencil

The second-generation Apple Pencil has the added benefit of one additional function, which is accessed by double-tapping the flat side of the Apple Pencil near the nib. In most circumstances, this will trigger the eraser feature of an app.

This can differ depending on the app, though, as app developers can assign a different action to the double-tap. That could be something like selecting a different artist tool. For the most part though, it’s used to trigger the eraser with the only notable difference being with the Notes app.

In the Notes app, you can change the double-tap function to trigger switching between the current and last used tool, showing the color palette, switching between the current tool and the eraser, and turning off the Apple Pencil 2.

Learning how to switch the double-tap function on the Apple Pencil 2 can improve using the best iPad apps.

Use the Apple Pencil to navigate your iPad

(Image credit: Luke Filipowicz / iMore)

The Apple Pencil supports basic navigational tapping and swiping within iOS, which is perfect for anyone with RSI issues or that just like being able to use a stylus on their tablet in between drawing and writing sessions. Because multitouch gestures and the Pencil are recognized separately by iPadOS, it may not be supported for advanced gesture-based navigation in separate apps. This could include any multi-finger operations.

However, in certain apps (like Astropad Studio mentioned above), you can use your fingers and Apple Pencil simultaneously. Notes also allows this. You can touch two fingers down when drawing in Notes, and then get a ruler you can use to draw straight lines with the Apple Pencil.

Best Apple Pencil Accessories

The Apple Pencil is quickly becoming a necessary companion for iPad users, but an often-lost one. Thanks to its slim cylindrical body and the removable magnetic cap, it’s far too simple to lose one or the other part under the couch cushions or down a gap you never noticed near your desk. Fortunately, there are dozens of Apple Pencil accessories to help keep your Pencil (and cap) safe, secure, and ready to sketch.

It’s also a good idea to consider one of the best cases for Apple Pencil 2 to add style and protection.

Apple Pencil (1st Generation)

Still a good buy

While it may not be quite as fancy as the newer version, it’s still the only version of Apple Pencil you can use with most iPads. If you want to experiment with drawing apps or just have an amazing stylus to use with your iPad, there’s no reason not to pick one up.

Apple Pencil (2nd Generation)

The absolute best

With a much more elegant magnetic charging solution, better pressure sensitivity, and overall better performance, the Apple Pencil (2nd Generation) is the ultimate stylus for the iPad Pro and iPad Air 4.

Can you use an Apple Pencil with an iPhone?

No, the Apple Pencil only works with screens made for it and that’s exclusively the iPad line. There are other styluses for iPhones, but they don’t have the same features as the Apple Pencil.

Need to know how to fix a faulty Apple Pencil?

The Apple Pencil is very easy to use and rarely has issues. However, if you are running into problems such as the Apple Pencil not responding in apps, disappearing from the Notification Center, or even refusing to turn on, we have some tips for how to troubleshoot it and fix the issue.

In no time, you’ll be back to enjoying getting the most from your iPad with the Apple Pencil.

iMore offers spot-on advice and guidance from our team of experts, with decades of Apple device experience to lean on. Learn more with iMore!

Contact me with news and offers from other Future brandsReceive email from us on behalf of our trusted partners or sponsors

Luke Filipowicz has been a writer at iMore, covering Apple for nearly a decade now. He writes a lot about Apple Watch and iPad but covers the iPhone and Mac as well. He often describes himself as an “Apple user on a budget” and firmly believes that great technology can be affordable if you know where to look. Luke also heads up the iMore Show — a weekly podcast focusing on Apple news, rumors, and products but likes to have some fun along the way.  

Luke knows he spends more time on Twitter than he probably should, so feel free to follow him or give him a shout on social media @LukeFilipowicz.

How to Use Apple Pencil (1st and 2nd Generation): The Complete Guide |

Contents

  • 1 Meet the Apple Pencil
  • 2 How to pair Apple Pencil with iPad
    • 2.1 How to pair Apple Pencil 1st generation
    • 2.2 How to pair Apple Pencil 2nd generation with iPad Pro
    • 900 13

    • 3 How to check the charge level batteries for Apple Pencil
      • 3.1 How to check the battery level of Apple Pencil 1st generation
      • 3.2 How to check the battery level of the second generation Apple Pencil
    • 4 How to charge the Apple Pencil
      • 4.1 How to charge the first generation Apple Pencil with the iPad Pro
      • 4.2 How to charge the first generation Apple Pencil with the Lightning adapter
      • 4.3 How to charge the second generation Apple Pencil
    • 5 How to disconnect your Apple Pencil from your iPad
    • 6 How to use the Apple Pencil with your iPad or iPad Pro
      • 6. 1 The Apple Pencil does not have an eraser – but it is fully sensitive to pressure and tilt
      • 6.2 How to change functions on the second generation Apple Pencil
      • 6.3 You can use the Apple Pencil to navigate an iPad or iPad Pro
      • 6.4 Apple Pencil can be used for almost everything
    • 7 Some extra tips and tricks for using Apple Pencil
    • 8 Best Apple Pencil Accessories
    • 9 Apple Pencil not working? Here is the fix!
    • 10 Other Apple Pencil questions?
    • 11 Drawing on iPad: The Complete Guide

    As of March 2019, all current iPad models support the first or second generation Apple Pencil. Whether you’re starting with an entry-level iPad, using iPad Air wherever you go, running professional apps on iPad Pro, or browsing Apple News+ on iPad mini, you can use one of two generations of Apple Pencil. It has full pressure sensitivity for dynamic line thickness, tilt control for shading, palm deflection for full drawing, and works like a simple stylus if you don’t want to touch the screen.

    To take full advantage of everything you can do with your Apple Pencil, you need to know how to use some fun extras. Here’s our complete guide to the Apple Pencil, whether you’re an artist, note-taker, or professional photo editor.

    • Meet the Apple Pencil
    • How to pair your Apple Pencil with your iPad
    • How to check the battery level on your Apple Pencil
    • How to charge your Apple Pencil
    • How to disconnect Apple Pencil from your iPad
    • How to use Apple Pencil with your iPad
    • Best Apple Pencil Accessories
    • Apple Pencil not working? Here is the fix!

    Meet the Apple Pencil

    If you’ve used a stylus for an iPad or other pen tablet before, you’ll find aspects of the Apple Pencil familiar—and others very different. Here’s a crash course on all things Apple Pencil for you!

    There are two different versions of Apple Pencil: Apple Pencil (1st generation) and Apple Pencil (2nd generation). If you think their names are too similar, consider that they are both white and nearly the same size. However, it is important to know the difference between the two generations as neither is supported on all iPad devices.

    Apple Pencil (1st Generation) works with:

    • iPad Air (3rd generation)
    • iPad mini (5th generation)
    • iPad (6th generation)
    • iPad 10.2″ 7th generation)
    • iPad Pro 12.9″ (2nd generation)
    • iPad Pro 12.9″ (1st generation)
    • iPad Pro 10.5″
    • iPad Pro 9.7- inch

    Apple Pencil (2nd Generation works with:

    • iPad Pro 12.9-inch (3rd generation)
    • iPad Pro 11-inch

    If you’re worried about getting the right generation Apple Pencil, the most distinctive difference is that the 1st generation Apple Pencil has a silver band around the top. Apple Pencil (2nd generation) no.

    There are some additional features that are not easy to spot in the photos but are more obvious in real life. Apple Pencil (2nd Generation) has a matte finish and one flat side. The Apple Pencil (1st generation) has a smooth, shiny surface and is completely round. The second-generation Apple Pencil has the word “Apple Pencil” written on the flat side. The first generation Apple Pencil has a silver stripe. The first generation Apple Pencil has a detachable cap that has a Lightning connector that is used to pair and charge the Pencil. The second generation Apple Pencil connects and charges magnetically, so it doesn’t use a Lightning connector (it’s also about half an inch shorter because of that).

    Before you begin, make sure you know which generation of Apple Pencil you have. Where there are differences between the two (such as pairing and charging), we have included sections for each generation separately.

    How to pair an Apple Pencil with an iPad

    Before you can use your Apple Pencil, you need to pair it with your iPad or iPad Pro. The first and second generation iPad Pro are different, so make sure you know your generation before you start.

    How to connect the first generation Apple Pencil

    1. Make sure the iPad you want to use and is unlocked, then uncork your pencil
    2. Connect your pencil to the new iPad.
    3. When prompted for a Bluetooth connection, press pair .

    How to pair a 2nd generation Apple Pencil with an iPad Pro

    1. Make sure the iPad you want to use is unlocked .
    2. Place the Apple Pencil in the wide side of the iPad Pro with magnetic stripe.
    3. Press pair when prompted for a Bluetooth connection.

    Now you can use your Apple Pencil with your iPad or iPad Pro! If you want to move the Pencil to another iPad, follow the same steps above with the new one.

    How to Check the Battery Level on an Apple Pencil

    The Apple Pencil does not have a physical charge barrel or LED indicator on the case; instead, you can check the current battery life on the currently connected iPad or iPad Pro.

    How to check the battery level of a first generation Apple Pencil

    1. Swipe down from the top of iPad to open Notification Center (or turn iPad on to view the lock screen).
    2. Swipe right to see the widget screen.
    3. View batteries section.

    4. If you don’t see the battery section, you may need to press 9 first0132 edit at the bottom of the widget area and click the green plus button next to batteries to add it as an active widget.

    How to Check the Battery Level of the Second Generation Apple Pencil

    The second generation Apple Pencil is even easier to check. You can follow the steps above for the first generation Apple Pencil, or simply place it on the magnetic charging strip on your iPad Pro (or remove and then put back if it’s currently connected to the magnetic charging strip). A notification about the current battery percentage will appear.

    How to charge your Apple Pencil

    When your Apple Pencil reaches 20%, 10% and 5% respectively, it will give you a charging warning. (You can also check the current battery status at any time by opening the Notification Center.)

    First and second generation Apple Pencils charge differently, so make sure you know your generation before reading on.

    How to charge a first generation Apple Pencil with an iPad Pro

    1. Remove Cap from your Apple Pencil . (If you’re worried about losing the cover while charging, you can attach it to your iPad near the Home button.)
    2. Insert your Apple Pencil Lightning Connector into your iPad or iPad Pro Lightning Port . How to Charge a First Generation Apple Pencil with a Lightning Adapter0133 .

    3. Insert your Apple Pencil Lightning Connector into Lightning Adapter .
    4. Plug Lightning Adapter into your Lightning Cable .

    How to charge the second generation Apple Pencil

    For the second generation Apple Pencil, Apple has made the charging process much easier. There is only one way.

    Simply place the Apple Pencil on the wide side of the iPad Pro magnetic stripe.

    Apple Pencil’s fast charging technology gives users up to 30 minutes of use after a 15-second charge, but we generally recommend charging the pencil for at least 5-10 minutes – especially if it’s less than 20% – to avoid having to constantly recharge ,

    How to Disconnect Your Apple Pencil from Your iPad

    Your Apple Pencil will automatically disconnect from your iPad or iPad Pro if you connect it to another iPad or you connect another Apple Pencil to your iPad. You can also cancel the pairing manually if the need arises.

    1. Launch the settings app from your iPad’s home screen.
    2. Press bluetooth .
    3. Press Information Button to the right of Apple Pencil under My Devices .
    4. Click on forget .

    To re-pair your first generation Apple Pencil, simply plug it into the Lightning port on your iPad or iPad Pro.

    To re-pair a second generation Apple Pencil, simply place it on your iPad Pro (2018)’s magnetic charging strip again.

    How to use Apple Pencil with your iPad or iPad Pro

    You don’t need to use a special menu or complex pairing process for each app to use your Apple Pencil: once you’ve paired it with your iPad or iPad Pro, you’re ready to draw, write, paint or navigate in any app you choose – just place the Pencil Pen on the iPad’s glass screen and reach for it!

    Apple Pencil doesn’t have an eraser – but is fully pressure and tilt sensitive

    Unlike Wacom’s patented styluses, the Apple Pencil doesn’t offer an eraser eraser: all your primary interactions with the iPad screen happen through the white Pencil tip on the first generation Apple Pencil and with a white nib or double tap on a flat surface. side of the second generation Apple Pencil.

    That’s not to say the pencil doesn’t have a few tricks up its sleeve, however: it’s fully pressure and tilt sensitive, which means you can press harder on the screen to get a thicker line, or tilt the pencil toward the screen to practically “shade” in the drawing or draw calligraphic letters.

    Some applications, such as Astropad Studio, even offer special combined pencil and tap gestures that are used in the same way as function buttons.

    How to change features on the 2nd generation Apple Pencil

    The 2nd generation Apple Pencil has the added benefit of one extra feature that can be accessed by double-pressing the flat side of the Apple Pencil next to the pen. In most cases, this calls the application’s eraser function.

    Application developers can assign a different action to the double tap, such as selecting a different artist tool, but so far we have seen that it is only used to launch the eraser in most applications other than the Notes application.

    In the Notes app, you can change the double-tap feature to trigger switching between the current and last used tool, displaying a color taste, switching between the current tool and the eraser, and turning off Apple Pencil 2.

    Here’s how to toggle the double tap feature on your Apple Pencil 2

    You can use your Apple Pencil to navigate your iPad or iPad Pro

    Whether you have RSI issues or just want to use the stylus on your tablet In between drawing or writing, Apple Pencil supports iOS’s basic navigational tap and swipe. Because multi-touch and pencil gestures are recognized separately by the iPad operating system, it may not be supported for advanced gesture-based navigation (such as multi-finger operations) in some apps.

    However, there is a downside: in some applications (like the aforementioned Astropad Studio), you can even use your fingers and the Apple Pencil at the same time. Notes is also a great example of this: tap with two fingers while drawing in Notes and you’ll get a ruler that you can use to draw straight lines with your Apple Pencil.

    Apple Pencil can be used for almost everything

    Even if you’re new to sketching, handwriting or calligraphy, there’s a lot you can do with a pencil and iPad. Here are just a few of the great things you can do:

    • Check out some great note-taking apps for the Apple Pencil
    • Check out some great note-taking apps for the Apple Pencil
    • Apple Pencil review – using the Apple Pencil itself!
    • Apple Pencil 2 Review – Using the Apple Pencil Itself Again

    Some Extra Tips and Tricks for Using the Apple Pencil

    You’ve covered the basics, and now check out a few extra tips and tricks to get the most out of your Apple Pencil (first and second generation).

    Best Apple Pencil Accessories

    The Apple Pencil is fast becoming an essential companion for iPad users, but often gets lost. Between its thin cylindrical white body and its removable magnetic lid, it’s not hard to lose one or the other due to cushions or forgetful minds. On the other hand, there are dozens of great Apple Pencil accessories to help keep your pencil (and cap) safe, secure, and ready to draw. Here are some of my favorites!

    • Best Apple Pencil Accessories (1st Generation)
    • Best Apple Pencil 2 Cases

    Apple Pencil Not Working? Here is the fix!

    More often than not, the Apple Pencil just works. But if you’re having an issue with Apple’s stylus not responding in apps, disappearing from the Action Center battery menu, or refusing to turn on, we’ve got some simple tips to help you get it back up and running.

    Troubleshooting Apple Pencil

    Other Apple Pencil questions?

    Let me know below!

    Updated September 2019: Updated for 10.2-inch iPad.

    Drawing on iPad: The Ultimate Guide

    • Apple Pencil 2 Overview
    • Apple Pencil: The Ultimate Guide
    • Apple Pencil Hand-Drawn Overview
    • How to Learn to Draw and Write with Apple Pencil
    • 9000 5 Best Drawing Apps

    • Top 9 handwriting apps0006
    • Best Apple Pencil Accessories
    • Best Apple Pencil 2 Cases

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    Apple Pencil 1 vs.

    2: Differences and Benefits

    Ever since the first generation Apple Pencil was released, iPad users have felt blessed with an exceptional tool for both drawing and writing. At that time, it was not thought that this version could be improved until its second generation was announced. In this article, Apple Pencil 1 vs 2 , we will share their most important differences.

    Index

    • 1 Why is one Apple Pencil better than another?
    • 2 Apple Pencil 1 vs Pencil 2 Which is better? Apple Pencil 1 vs 2: Compatibility
    • 4 Which version has more advantages?

    Why is one Apple Pencil better than another?

    Until 2015, when the first Apple Pencil was released, there was no digital tool specifically designed to meet the needs of the artist. And it’s not only about aspects such as a variety of drawing tools or a wide palette of colors, but also about the instant response and accuracy of the accessory.

    There is a lot of engineering behind these qualities, which we can summarize in the following three technological attributes:

    • Pressure sensitive.
    • Adaptation to the angle of inclination.
    • Palm detection technology.

    With the right use of these characteristics of the Apple Pencil, one could draw thick, thin, or shaded lines, always following the artist’s inspiration.

    Back in 2018, the second generation of the Apple Pencil was released, including significant improvements over its predecessor, most notably its ability to connect and charge the battery wirelessly.

    Apple Pencil 1 vs Pencil 2 Which is better?

    Below, both types of pencils are compared in both aesthetic and functional aspects:

    design

    At first glance, you can see the differences at the level of design between both models of pencils. He Apple Pencil 1st generation has a cylindrical shape and a smooth surface. , while the 2nd generation is covered in matte finish and has a flat side.

    Although the first pencil has a length of 175.7 mm, with a diameter of 8.9 mm and a weight of 20.7 grams, the second, despite the same weight and the same diameter, measures 166 mm long.

    Communication

    Apple Pencil 1st generation is paired and charged by establishing a physical connection between the pencil and the Lightning port on iPad. While the pen is charging, it must remain connected to the iPad. , which detracts from the functionality of the accessory.

    The first pen can also be charged from another power source, which can be connected to the Lightning adapter included with the accessory.

    The most important achievement of the second generation of Apple Pencil is its ability to Wireless charging and pairing. To do this, just attach the pencil to the magnetic connector that the iPad has on one of its sides.

    The iPad must be turned on and Bluetooth turned on for the second pencil to charge effectively.

    The chance of this pencil model running out of power is greatly reduced if it is regularly plugged into the iPad’s magnetic connector, as it should be when not in use.

    gestures

    Another improvement that the second generation pen includes is that it has an interface on the flat side that is used to change the way the pen works. Double click on the interface, you can:

    • Switch between current tool and eraser.
    • Switch between the current tool and the last tool used.
    • Show color palette.
    • Off

    You can configure various settings in Settings > Apple Pencil.

    Accuracy, impact, and pressure

    Sensitivity to tilt, pressure, and momentary impact while drawing or writing is a quality that is present in both generations of the pen for which Apple has not reported improvements.

    Battery life and charge

    According to product specifications, a fully charged battery of either of the two pens can last up to 12 hours of continuous use.

    Both pencil models can be fully charged in 30 minutes. Similarly, it was possible to demonstrate that 15 seconds of charging is enough for the battery to charge for another 30 minutes.

    Keep in mind that the batteries in any Apple Pencil can be charged but not replaced.

    Apple Pencil 1 vs 2: Compatibility

    Definitely a determining factor when choosing which pencil model to buy. Support for the 2nd generation Apple Pencil is limited to select iPad Pro models.

    As stated above, owners of the iPad, iPad Air or iPad Mini, would have no choice but to use the 1st generation Apple Pencil. If they prefer a second-generation pencil, they will be forced to change the iPad model.

    iPad compatible with 1st generation Apple Pencil

    • iPad mini (XNUMXth generation) .
    • iPad (XNUMXth generation and up) .
    • iPad Air (XNUMXth generation) .
    • iPad Pro 12.9″ (XNUMXth and XNUMXth generation) .
    • 10.5-inch iPad Pro .
    • 9.7-inch iPad Pro .

    iPad compatible with 2nd generation Apple Pencil

    • iPad mini (XNUMXth generation).
    • iPad Air (XNUMXth generation and later).
    • iPad Pro 12.9″ (XNUMXth generation and up).
    • iPad Pro 11-inch (XNUMXth generation and up).

    Which version has more advantages?

    There are several benefits that make the 2nd generation Apple Pencil the best pencil. It has more features than its predecessor, of which the most stand out are:

    • convenient storage
    • Ease of use
    • The most efficient charging method
    • Customizable (Apple offers free engraving of a phrase up to 15 characters long on a pencil.