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Identify your MacBook Air model

Use this information to find out which MacBook Air you have, and where it fits in the history of MacBook Air.

Your Mac provides several tools to help you identify it. The simplest is About This Mac, available by choosing About This Mac from the Apple  menu in the upper-left corner of your screen. The other is the System Information app. Learn how to use these tools to identify your Mac.

If you don’t have your Mac or it doesn’t start up, use one of these solutions instead:

  • Find the serial number printed on the underside of your Mac, near the regulatory markings. It’s also on the original packaging, next to a barcode label. You can then enter that serial number on the Check Coverage page or Tech Specs page to find your model.
  • The original packaging might also show an Apple part number, such as MQD32xx/A (“xx” is a variable that differs by country or region). You can match the Apple part number to one in the list below to find your model.

2023

MacBook Air (15-inch, M2, 2023)
Colors: Silver, starlight, space gray, midnight
Model Identifier: Mac14,15
Part Numbers: MQKP3xx/A, MQKQ3xx/A, MQKR3xx/A, MQKT3xx/A, MQKU3xx/A, MQKV3xx/A, MQKW3xx/A, MQKX3xx/A
Newest compatible operating system: macOS Ventura
Tech Specs: MacBook Air (15-inch, M2, 2023)
User Guide: MacBook Air (15-inch, M2, 2023)

2022

MacBook Air (M2, 2022)
Colors: Silver, starlight, space gray, midnight
Model Identifier: Mac14,2
Part Numbers: MLXW3xx/A, MLXX3xx/A, MLXY3xx/A, MLY03xx/A, MLY13xx/A, MLY23xx/A, MLY33xx/A, MLY43xx/A
Newest compatible operating system: macOS Ventura
Tech Specs: MacBook Air (M2, 2022)
User Guide: MacBook Air (M2, 2022)

2020

MacBook Air (M1, 2020)
Colors: Space gray, gold, silver
Model Identifier: MacBookAir10,1
Part Numbers: MGN63xx/A, MGN93xx/A, MGND3xx/A, MGN73xx/A, MGNA3xx/A, MGNE3xx/A
Newest compatible operating system: macOS Ventura
Tech Specs: MacBook Air (M1, 2020)
User Guide: MacBook Air (M1, 2020)

 

MacBook Air (Retina, 13-inch, 2020)
Colors: Space gray, gold, silver
Model Identifier: MacBookAir9,1
Part Numbers: MVh32xx/A, MVh52xx/A, MVH52xx/A, MWTJ2xx/A, MWTK2xx/A, MWTL2xx/A
Newest compatible operating system: macOS Ventura
Tech Specs: MacBook Air (Retina, 13-inch, 2020)
User Guide: MacBook Air (Retina, 13-inch, 2020)

2019

MacBook Air (Retina, 13-inch, 2019)
Colors: Space gray, gold, silver
Model Identifier: MacBookAir8,2
Part Numbers: MVFh3xx/A, MVFJ2xx/A, MVFK2xx/A, MVFL2xx/A, MVFM2xx/A, MVFN2xx/A, MVH62xx/A, MVH82xx/A
Newest compatible operating system: macOS Ventura
Tech Specs: MacBook Air (Retina, 13-inch, 2019)
User Guide: MacBook Air (Retina, 13-inch, 2019)

 

2018

MacBook Air (Retina, 13-inch, 2018)
Colors: Space gray, gold, silver
Model Identifier: MacBookAir8,1
Part Numbers: MRE82xx/A, MREA2xx/A, MREE2xx/A, MRE92xx/A, MREC2xx/A, MREF2xx/A, MUQT2xx/A, MUQU2xx/A, MUQV2xx/A
Newest compatible operating system: macOS Ventura
Tech Specs: MacBook Air (Retina, 13-inch, 2018)
User Guide: MacBook Air (Retina, 13-inch, 2018)

 

2017

MacBook Air (13-inch, 2017)
Model Identifier: MacBookAir7,2
Part Numbers: MQD32xx/A, MQD42xx/A, MQD52xx/A
Newest compatible operating system: macOS Monterey
Tech Specs: MacBook Air (13-inch, 2017)
User Guide: MacBook Air (13-inch, 2017)

 

2015

MacBook Air (13-inch, Early 2015)
Model Identifier: MacBookAir7,2
Part Numbers: MJVE2xx/A, MJVG2xx/A, MMGF2xx/A, MMGG2xx/A
Newest compatible operating system: macOS Monterey
Tech Specs: MacBook Air (13-inch, Early 2015)
User Guide: MacBook Air (13-inch, Early 2015)

 

MacBook Air (11-inch, Early 2015)
Model Identifier: MacBookAir7,1
Part Numbers: MJVM2xx/A, MJVP2xx/A
Newest compatible operating system: macOS Monterey
Tech Specs: MacBook Air (11-inch, Early 2015)
User Guide: MacBook Air (11-inch, Early 2015)

 

2014

MacBook Air (13-inch, Early 2014)
Model Identifier: MacBookAir6,2
Part Numbers: MD760xx/B, MD761xx/B
Newest compatible operating system: macOS Big Sur
Tech Specs: MacBook Air (13-inch, Early 2014)
User Guide: MacBook Air (13-inch, Early 2014)

 

MacBook Air (11-inch, Early 2014)
Model Identifier: MacBookAir6,1
Part Numbers: MD711xx/B, MD712xx/B
Newest compatible operating system: macOS Big Sur
Tech Specs: MacBook Air (11-inch, Early 2014)
User Guide: MacBook Air (11-inch, Early 2014)

 

2013

MacBook Air (13-inch, Mid 2013)
Model Identifier: MacBookAir6,2
Part Numbers: MD760xx/A, MD761xx/A
Newest compatible operating system: macOS Big Sur
Tech Specs: MacBook Air (13-inch, Mid 2013)
User Guide: MacBook Air (13-inch, Mid 2013)

 

MacBook Air (11-inch, Mid 2013)
Model Identifier: MacBookAir6,1
Part Numbers: MD711xx/A, MD712xx/A
Newest compatible operating system: macOS Big Sur
Tech Specs: MacBook Air (11-inch, Mid 2013)
User Guide: MacBook Air (11-inch, Mid 2013)

 

2012

MacBook Air (13-inch, Mid 2012)
Model Identifier: MacBookAir5,2
Part Numbers: MD231xx/A, MD232xx/A
Newest compatible operating system: macOS Catalina
Tech Specs: MacBook Air (13-inch, Mid 2012)
User Guide: MacBook Air (13-inch, Mid 2012)

 

MacBook Air (11-inch, Mid 2012)
Model Identifier: MacBookAir5,1
Part Numbers: MD223xx/A, MD224xx/A
Newest compatible operating system: macOS Catalina
Tech Specs: MacBook Air (11-inch, Mid 2012)
User Guide: MacBook Air (11-inch, Mid 2012)

 

2011

MacBook Air (13-inch, Mid 2011)
Model Identifier: MacBookAir4,2
Part Numbers: MC965xx/A, MC966xx/A
Newest compatible operating system: macOS High Sierra
Tech Specs: MacBook Air (13-inch, Mid 2011)
User Guide: MacBook Air (13-inch, Mid 2011)

 

MacBook Air (11-inch, Mid 2011)
Model Identifier: MacBookAir4,1
Part Numbers: MC968xx/A, MC969xx/A
Newest compatible operating system: macOS High Sierra
Tech Specs: MacBook Air (11-inch, Mid 2011)
User Guide: MacBook Air (11-inch, Mid 2011)

 

2010

MacBook Air (13-inch, Late 2010)
Model Identifier: MacBookAir3,2
Part Numbers: MC503xx/A, MC504xx/A
Newest compatible operating system: macOS High Sierra
Tech Specs: MacBook Air (13-inch, Late 2010)

 

MacBook Air (11-inch, Late 2010)
Model Identifier: MacBookAir3,1
Part Numbers: MC505xx/A, MC506xx/A
Newest compatible operating system: macOS High Sierra
Tech Specs: MacBook Air (11-inch, Late 2010)

 

2009

MacBook Air (Mid 2009)
Model Identifier: MacBookAir2,1
Part Numbers: MC505xx/A, MC233xx/A, MC234xx/A
Newest compatible operating system: OS X El Capitan
Tech Specs: MacBook Air (Mid 2009)

 

Published Date: 

New 15-Inch Model Available! Features, Buying Advice, Deals and More

The M2 MacBook Air

Contents

  1. The M2 MacBook Air
  2. How to Buy
  3. 15-Inch MacBook Air Reviews
  4. Design
  • Keyboard and Trackpad
  • Touch ID
  • Ports
  • Display
  • M2 Apple Silicon Chip
    • Memory and Storage
  • Battery Life
  • Other Features
    • Connectivity
    • Speakers and Microphone
    • FaceTime Camera
  • Available Configurations and Upgrade Options
    • Available Configurations and Upgrade Options
    • Entry-Level 13-Inch MacBook Air Upgrade Options
    • Higher-End 13-Inch MacBook Air Upgrade Options
    • Entry-Level 15-Inch MacBook Air Upgrade Options
    • Higher-End 15-Inch MacBook Air Upgrade Options
  • What’s Next for the MacBook Air
  • MacBook Air Timeline
  • Apple sells two versions of the MacBook Air, one that measures in at 13. 6 inches and one that measures in at 15.3 inches. The 13-inch model was introduced in June 2022, while the 15-inch model came out in June 2023, adding a second model to the current-generation MacBook Air lineup for the first time since the 11-inch version was discontinued.

    With 13- and 15-inch options, the MacBook Air lineup is suitable for those who want portability and those who prefer larger displays, with no need for those who want a bigger screen to shell out more for the MacBook Pro lineup. Both MacBook Air models feature the M2 Apple silicon chip, which has been around since 2022.

    The 2022 refresh introduced a new design to the MacBook Air that Apple also carried over to the new 15-inch model. There is an updated chassis that does away with the tapered design that the MacBook Air used for so long. Instead, the updated MacBook Air models adopts a uniform, flat body similar to the MacBook Pro.

    The 13-inch MacBook Air is 11.3mm thick, making it a bit thinner than the prior-generation MacBook Air, and it weighs 2.7 pounds. It is just about the same size as the prior-generation model at 11.97 inches wide and 8.46 inches tall.

    The 15-inch MacBook Air is 11.5mm thick, and at 3.3 pounds, it weighs a half pound more than the 13-inch model. It measures in at 13.4 inches wide and 9.35 inches tall.

    Thin black bezels surround an updated 13.6-inch Liquid Retina Display for the 13-inch model and a 15.3-inch Liquid Retina Display for the 15-inch model, both of which support 1 billion colors and feature 500 nits brightness

    There is a notch at the top of the MacBook Air display, which allows for more screen space around the updated 1080p FaceTime HD camera. Apple added a built-in four-speaker sound system for the 13-inch MacBook Air that supports spatial audio and wide stereo, while the 15-inch model has a six-speaker system. Both models include a three-microphone array.

    The MacBook Air comes in Silver, Space Gray, Starlight, and Midnight, the latter of which is a new dark blue shade that’s almost black. The MacBook Air continues to feature a black keyboard with Touch ID and a large Force Touch trackpad.

    Two USB-C ports are available on the MacBook Air along with a MagSafe port for charging purposes and a 3.5mm headphone jack with support for high-impedance headphones.

    The battery in the MacBook Air lasts for up to 18 hours when watching movies or TV, and up to 15 hours when browsing the web. It supports fast-charging with an optional 70W USB-C power adapter.

    Apple’s MacBook Air is equipped with a next-generation M2 chip, a follow up to the original M1. The M2 chip features an 8-core CPU and up to a 10-core GPU, along with support for up to 24GB memory. Compared to the M1, the M2 offers advancements in performance and efficiency with an 18 percent faster CPU, a 35 percent faster GPU, and a 40 percent faster Neural Engine. Both models use the same M2 chip even though the 15-inch MacBook Air was introduced a year after the 13-inch model.

    Pricing on the 13-inch MacBook Air with M2 chip starts at $1,099, with Apple introducing a $100 price drop following the launch of the 15-inch version. The 15-inch MacBook Air is priced starting at $1,299, with SSD and processor upgrades available for both models at higher prices. Apple is continuing to sell the M1 MacBook Air for $999.

    Note: See an error in this roundup or want to offer feedback? Send us an email here.

    How to Buy

    15-Inch MacBook Air Reviews

    Apple in 2023 introduced a new, larger-sized MacBook Air, which accompanies the 13-inch MacBook Air that came out in 2022. According to reviewers, the new 15-inch model hits the “sweet spot” in value, size, and performance.

    At $700 cheaper than the 14-inch MacBook Pro, the 15-inch MacBook Air is available at a good price point for a thin, ultra portable laptop. Reviwers praised the speaker system, which is improved compared to the 13-inch model, and the 18-hour battery life.

    For more on what reviewers thought of the MacBook Air, we have a dedicated MacBook Air review roundup.

    Apple overhauled the design of the MacBook Air in 2022, marking the first major design update to the MacBook Air line since 2010. The updated MacBook Air does away with the tapered chassis that the MacBook Air has used for years, instead introducing a flat MacBook Pro-style body that’s the same thickness from front to back.

    In 2023, Apple introduced a new 15.3-inch version of the MacBook Air that uses this same design, but with a bigger display size for those who are looking for an affordable machine that has a larger screen. The 13-inch MacBook Air and the 15-inch MacBook Air feature identical designs with the exception of the chassis and display size.

    The 13-inch MacBook Air is about the same overall size as the prior-generation version, but there are some slight differences. It measures in at 11.3mm thick, which is quite a bit thinner than the thickest point of the prior model (16.1mm). It is 11.97 inches long and 8.46 inches deep, and it weighs in at 2.7 pounds, just a little lighter than the 2.8-pound prior-generation model.

    The 15-inch MacBook Air is, of course, larger. It is 11.5mm thick, so just a touch thicker than the 13-inch version. It is 13.4-inches long and 9.35-inches deep, and it is heavier at 3.3 pounds.

    Two Thunderbolt/USB-C ports are available at the left side of both machines, along with a MagSafe charging port and a 3.5mm headphone jack. Apple added four rubber feet to the bottom of the machine, another MacBook Pro-style design touch.

    There are black bezels around the display, similar to the prior-generation model, and it features a black Magic Keyboard with no Touch Bar, along with a large Force Touch trackpad. It is essentially a smaller, lighter version of the MacBook Pro.

    The MacBook Air is available in Silver, Space Gray, Starlight (a light gold), and Midnight, a new dark blue color.

    Keyboard and Trackpad

    The MacBook Air uses the same Magic Keyboard from the prior-generation model. It features a scissor switch mechanism that is able to hold up to dust and particulates without failing, unlike the butterfly keyboards that Apple used in older Macs.

    The scissor mechanism in the MacBook Air’s keyboard offers 1mm of key travel and a stable key feel, plus it uses an Apple-designed rubber dome that stores more potential energy for a more responsive key press. The keyboard also features backlit keys controlled by an ambient light sensor to light up the keys in dark rooms.

    As with the M1 Pro and M1 Max MacBook Pro models, the MacBook Air has a full row of function keys with no Touch Bar.

    Below the keyboard, there’s a large Force Touch trackpad that is unchanged from prior models. The Force Touch trackpad has no traditional buttons and is powered by a set of Force Sensors, allowing users to press anywhere on the trackpad to get the same response. A Taptic Engine powered by magnets provides users with tactile feedback when using the trackpad, replacing the feel of a physical button press.

    The Force Touch trackpad supports a light press, which is used as a regular click, along with a deeper press or “force click” as a separate gesture that does things like offer up definitions for a highlighted word.

    Touch ID

    The M2 MacBook Air has a Touch ID fingerprint sensor that’s located next to the function keys at the top of the keyboard. Touch ID is powered by a Secure Enclave that keeps your fingerprint data and personal information safe.

    Touch ID on the MacBook Air can be used instead of a password, unlocking the Mac when a finger is placed on the sensor. It also replaces a password for password-protected apps, and it can be used to make Apple Pay purchases in Safari.

    Ports

    The MacBook Air features two Thunderbolt 3/USB-C ports that support transfer speeds of up to 40Gb/s, plus there’s a new MagSafe 3 charging port that is identical to the charging port added to the 14- and 16-inch MacBook Pro models.

    There is a 3.5mm headphone jack with support for high-impedance headphones.

    Display

    The 2022 MacBook Air has a display that measure in at 13.6 inches, while the 2023 MacBook Air’s display is 15.3 inches in size. Both models have slim bezels and use “Liquid Retina Display Technology.” Like the MacBook Pro, the MacBook Air has a notch to allow for more display space while still providing access to a 1080p webcam.

    The 13-inch MacBook Air has a 2560 x 1664 resolution with 224 pixels per inch, while the 15-inch MacBook Air has a 2880 by 1864 resolution, also with 224 pixels per inch. Both displays offer support for 1 billion colors and P3 Wide color for vivid, true-to-life colors. Brightness maxes out at 500 nits.

    The display in the MacBook Air uses True Tone, which is designed to tweak the color of the display to match the lighting in the room. True Tone works through a multi-channel ambient light sensor that’s included in the MacBook Air models, which is able to determine both the brightness of the room and the color temperature.

    After detecting the white balance, the MacBook Air is able to adjust both the color and intensity of the display to match the room’s lighting for a more natural, paper-like viewing experience that also cuts down on eyestrain.

    M2 Apple Silicon Chip

    Apple uses the M2 chip in both the 13.6- and 15.3-inch MacBook Air models. The M2, which is the successor to the M1, has an 8-core CPU, much like the M1, but it supports eight or ten GPU cores, up from seven or eight in the M1.

    Apple says that the M2 chip is built using next-generation 5-nanometer technology, with better performance per watt. It consists of 20 billion transistors, 25 percent more than the M1, adding more memory bandwidth at 100GB/s.

    The M2 chip is 1.4x faster than the M1, and 15x faster than old Intel-based MacBook Air options. It features an 18 percent faster CPU, a 35 percent more powerful GPU, and a 40 percent faster Neural Engine.

    Geekbench benchmarks have confirmed that the M2 chip is up to 20 percent faster than the M1 chip when it comes to multi-core performance.

    The M2, which runs at 3.49GHz compared to 3.2GHz for the M1, earned a single-core score of 1919, which is roughly 12 percent faster than the 1707 single-core score of the M1 MacBook Air. The M2 earned a multi-core score of 8928, up about 20 percent from the 7419 score of the M1 model.

    As for the Metal benchmark, the M2 chip scored 30627, a notable improvement over the 21001 score earned by the M1. The M2 chip offers up to a 10-core GPU, compared to the 8-core maximum of the M1.

    As with the M1 MacBook Air, the M2 MacBook Air models do not contain fans and are able to operate silently.

    Memory and Storage

    The M2 MacBook Air supports up to 24GB of unified memory and up to 2TB of SSD storage. The base models ship with 8GB memory and 256GB storage.

    Battery Life

    The 13-inch MacBook Air is equipped with a 52.6-watt-hour lithium-polymer battery, while the 15-inch MacBook Air has a 66.5-watt-hour lithium-polymer battery. Though the 15-inch MacBook Air’s battery is larger, both machines last for up to 18 hours when watching movies using the Apple TV app, or up to 15 hours when wirelessly browsing the web.

    The base model 13-inch MacBook Air ships with a 30W USB-C power adapter, while the higher-end 13-inch base model with 10-core GPU comes with a 35W Dual USB-C Port Compact Power Adapter. An optional 70W USB-C power adapter available for an extra $20 enables fast charging. The base model 15-inch MacBook Air ships with a 35W Dual USB-C Power Adapter, but customers can instead opt to choose the 70W USB-C power adapter for fast charging instead.

    Other Features

    Connectivity

    The MacBook Air supports 802.11ax WiFi, which is known as Wi-Fi 6, a WiFi protocol that’s faster and more efficient than the prior-generation 802. 11ac WiFi. It also supports the Bluetooth 5.3 specification, which is faster and more reliable than Bluetooth 5.0.

    Speakers and Microphone

    The 13-inch MacBook Air features a four-speaker sound system to the MacBook Air with improved stereo separation and vocal clarity from two tweeters and two ultrathin woofers. There is more space in the 15-inch MacBook Air, so it is equipped with a six-speaker sound system with force-cancelling woofers for superior sound. The sound system is one of the few differences between the 13- and 15-inch models.

    Both MacBook Air speaker systems support wide stereo sound and Spatial Audio. Spatial Audio is available when playing music or video with Dolby Atmos on the built-in speakers, and Spatial Audio with dynamic head tracking can be used with the third-generation AirPods, AirPods Pro, and AirPods Max.

    The MacBook Air is also equipped with a three-microphone array with directional beamforming for better sound quality on video calls.

    FaceTime Camera

    The MacBook Air features the same 1080p FaceTime HD camera that was introduced in the 2021 14- and 16-inch MacBook Pro models. It is powered by an advanced image signal processor with computational video that improves video quality, and Apple says it offers double the resolution and low-light performance of the previous generation.

    Available Configurations and Upgrade Options

    Available Configurations and Upgrade Options

    There are two stock 13-inch M2 MacBook Air configurations available from Apple, in Silver, Space Gray, Starlight, and Midnight

    • $1,099 – M2 chip with 8-core GPU, 8GB RAM, 256GB SSD.
    • $1,399 – M2 chip with 10-core GPU, 8GB RAM, 512GB SSD.

    Entry-Level 13-Inch MacBook Air Upgrade Options

    • 10-core GPU – +$100
    • 16GB Unified Memory – +$200
    • 24GB Unified Memory – +$400
    • 512GB SSD – +$200
    • 1TB SSD – +$400
    • 2TB SSD – +$800
    • 35W Dual USB-C Power Adapter – +$20
    • 70W USB-C Power Adapter – +$20

    Higher-End 13-Inch MacBook Air Upgrade Options

    • 16GB Unified Memory – +$200
    • 24GB Unified Memory – +$400
    • 1TB SSD – +$200
    • 2TB SSD – +$600

    There are two stock 15-inch MacBook Air configurations available from Apple as well.

    • $1,299 – M2 chip with 10-core GPU, 8GB RAM, 256GB SSD.
    • $1,499 – M2 chip with 10-core GPU, 8GB RAM, 512GB SSD.

    Entry-Level 15-Inch MacBook Air Upgrade Options

    • 16GB Unified Memory – +$200
    • 24GB Unified Memory – +$400
    • 512GB SSD – +$200
    • 1TB SSD – +$400
    • 2TB SSD – +$800

    Higher-End 15-Inch MacBook Air Upgrade Options

    • 16GB Unified Memory – +$200
    • 24GB Unified Memory – +$400
    • 1TB SSD – +$200
    • 2TB SSD – +$600

    What’s Next for the MacBook Air

    Apple is working on new versions of the MacBook Air that are equipped with next-generation M3 chips. The M3 chip will be built on TSMC’s 3-nanometer process, bringing performance and efficiency improvements.

    The M3 chip is expected to have similar CPU and GPU core counts as the M2 chip, and the new MacBook Air models that use it will likely come out in 2024. Apple is planning to refresh both the 13 and 15-inch MacBook Air models.

    Additional cooling for MacBook Pro – in the fight for quiet laptop operation / Sudo Null IT News But not all users are suitable for this architecture. It seems to me that this is mainly due to the specifics of the work. In addition to experimenting and creating all sorts of startups, I work as a back-end developer and I often have to run a lot of Docker containers that drive my laptop coolers crazy.

    Since I work from different places in the apartment (mainly those that are not occupied by a child), and sometimes I go to work in cafes / co-working spaces, my main working tool is a laptop, not a PC. About 7 years ago, I started using Apple technology, which led to the purchase of a Macbook. And so, in 2021, I bought myself a Macbook pro 2019 16 ‘laptop (on Intel i9). But to my surprise, it also makes a lot of noise like the previous 2018 model (although the cooling, according to Apple, has changed). In the struggle for quiet work, I started surfing the Internet and came across a funny post from Suzuki Akinori :

    Copper 10 yen coins were used. Which should have better dissipated the heat coming out and coming into the laptop. I liked this idea so much that I began to look for opportunities to repeat the experiment and conduct real tests. As a result, I expected to get a quiet operation of the laptop during load and, as a result, higher performance (since I often saw posts about this model trotting, which can be confirmed by grinding during operation).


    Theory

    The top of the Macbook Pro keyboard heats up to 48.2°C. This story is repeated with other MacBook models with Intel processors.

    Thermal image of a 2012 Macbook Pro

    This is the area where the processor and discrete graphics card are located. The heating of the panel behind the keyboard is directly related to the hot air outlet, since there is no direct contact of the cooling radiators. At the same time, it is important to note that air intake for cooling occurs from the sides of the laptop (near the speakers) and from the side of the display. Pictorial images from apple.com:

    Blue lines – air intake, red lines – air outlet

    As a result, we have a common part of the laptop case, which heats up due to the exit of warm air and it is taken (theoretically hot) from the same side to cool the device. There is also an air intake from the side faces, but in this case there is no intersection with a hot stream.


    Calculation and design

    This shape is standard for radiators, allowing heat to be dissipated by dissipating it from the bottom. Thanks to this form, it will be possible to apply active cooling (in the form of a cooler 4010 – 40×40×10 mm). The height of the radiator of 15 mm was chosen in order not to overlap part of the screen, the length and width – according to the size of the laptop.

    Initially, the idea was to choose from existing, ready-made, profiles. On aliexpress I found many options, including those made of copper. But in this case it would be necessary to adjust the sizes, and also to wait for delivery. And I wanted to experiment quickly enough.

    As an alternative, I started looking for local companies or just people with access to the necessary machines and materials. The possibility of choosing copper (which by the way has a thermal conductivity of 401 W / (m K)) immediately disappeared as soon as the price tag for manufacturing was named (more than $ 200). Aluminum is not an ideal material for heat dissipation (thermal conductivity 202–236 W/(m K)), but a good start for an experiment.

    After a long search for a company that would undertake the manufacture of one copy, it became clear that we need to look for local craftsmen who would take up the job, but with their own conditions. So, one of the conditions was the manufacture of two strips 175 mm long, which would simplify the work for the master, but for me it did not play a special role. We managed to increase the number of ribs and now there are 5 of them (instead of the planned 4). According to the master, this was to improve the heat dissipation coefficient. The cost of products was $ 25


    Testing

    One day later I received a radiator (two, to be exact, of which we can get one of the required length).

    The radiator was in oil, it took a long time to clean it and wash it from chips. And of course, the geometry of the lower part of the radiator was not perfectly even, but I relied on thermal paste (it could have been a thermal pad – but I didn’t have it at hand, and the price for it was higher than I expected).

    Before testing with a heatsink, I did some tests in GeekBench 5 while recording video. In parallel, running Macs Fan Control to monitor the temperature and speed of the laptop fans, because it is the fan speed that leads to noise. After all, it is the fan speed that comes to the noise and, considering that in the MacBook Pro 16′ 2019a new cooling system, the speed of rotation of the propellers has increased. Also, during testing, I used stands under the rear legs of the laptop to capture more air and after that the keyboard tilt became more comfortable, as it seemed to me (I used the national currency as a stand – several layers of 5 kopecks each).

    As a result, there are 3 videos that demonstrate the results of using such cooling:0047

    Without heatsink: Single-core – 1118, Multi-core – 6649

    With heatsink: Single-core – 1183, Multi-core – 6464

    With heatsink and cooler : Single-core – 1181, Multi-core – 6447

    after testing in GeekBench 5 – the result is not impressive, it is surprising that in the multi-core test minus 200 (parrots) and in the single-core test plus 60 (parrots). But it is noticeable that a couple of seconds later the cooler accelerates to 5000 rpm when using a radiator with active cooling. At the same time, the temperature of the radiator during the tests is already about 25-30 degrees, which confirms good heat dissipation.

    One of the key points was being able to work quietly while performing the main tasks related to my field of work. And also get a performance increase, and as a result, get rid of overheating throttling. But, when running ordinary applications or containers, the rotation speed of the screws increased to 4500 rpm, which led to the creation of unpleasant noise despite my efforts with this radiator. Performance improvement, as we can see from the test results, was also not achieved.

    Another disadvantage was that it is strictly forbidden to close the laptop lid!

    This is how the test turned out. I hope you enjoyed reading this. If you have ideas on how to improve laptop cooling systems – share in the comments, I will be glad to try.

    By the way, I also write short posts in the telegram channel about technologies that surprised me or simply interested me. I will be glad to see you there.

    P.S. Thanks to @Keeper1 for helping with troubleshooting.

    How to keep your MacBook cool even in the heat

    Summer is fast approaching, which means that very soon we will have a strong heat: in one of the summer months, you and your MacBook will still have to deal with it. If it is easy enough for a person to escape from the heat, then high-precision technology needs special care: Apple specifies that the operating ambient temperature should not exceed 50 degrees Celsius for Mac computers. This means that you cannot use your laptop in the heat, and if there is no other way out, then you need to look for a way to cool it down. We tell how cool the MacBook in the heat .

    What should I do if my MacBook is getting hot in the heat?

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    Contents 3 What to do if the Macbook gets hot

  • 4 How to cool the Macbook
  • How to do it right use a Macbook

    This is definitely not worth doing, otherwise the laptop will heat up and go crazy

    Keeping any laptop on your lap, on a bed or on a fabric surface is a big mistake for any user, even the most experienced one. Soft fabrics and objects do not provide the necessary air circulation and can even block it on Apple laptops. Even if your MacBook is on the sofa or bed, try placing a book or magazine under it, or better yet, place it on a wooden, glass, or metal surface.

    As a last resort, try Raise the back of the MacBook in order to provide the necessary air circulation: to do this, just place something solid under it. It’s not as efficient as a laptop stand, but the helps keep the MacBook cool.

    Read also: How to properly wear your MacBook in winter

    MacBook stand

    We live in an era of high-tech gadgets and exactly the same accessories, so you can safely choose an adjustable stand for your MacBook. I chose an aluminum one from Baseus for my computer: firstly, it is ideal for any laptop from 13 to 17 inches, and secondly, it is compact – you can even take it on a trip. Thanks to its shape, the stand helps to cool the laptop better.

    This compact accessory really helps out and saves you from a lot of problems with overheating

    It does not take up much space (only 0. 3 mm thick). A big plus of this gadget is the assembly material: aluminum does not scratch, deform or heat up, which is why at high temperatures it does not stink like the same plastic. You can set the optimal angle of inclination and provide the desired level of system cooling.

    How to wear a Macbook - the questions you were embarrassed to ask

    What to do if the Macbook gets hot

    It’s better not to keep the Macbook in the heat and put it away

    How else to save the laptop from the heat? Here are a couple of life hacks that will definitely not make the device worse.

    • If you don’t have a book or magazine handy, try placing your laptop on the edge of a table: yes, it’s a little dangerous, but it will increase airflow where the MacBook heats up.
    • If there is an ordinary room fan nearby, you can use it. It sounds a little silly, but you need to save yourself somehow: last summer, in the Moscow heat, you had to simply direct airflow from the fan towards the laptop to dissipate heat. Definitely better than nothing at all.
    • Keep out of the sun. Sitting under the scorching sun is definitely not worth it, not only in the open air, but also at home on the balcony. If possible, it is better to hide in the far corner of the room away from the window. By the way, you should not sit under the sun even on days of moderate heat, otherwise it will overload the fans.

    Perhaps unprofessional advice, but what do you do when your laptop turns into a hot cake? Save yourself with improvised means!

    Is it true that an iPhone can be infected with a virus

    How to cool a Macbook

    The fans will start to run faster, and this will really allow the gadget to cool more efficiently. True, Apple does not support this idea: it can lead to hardware problems and system overload, so you should not repeat the trick.

    Perhaps the best solution is to simply put the laptop away in a bag

    No matter how you slice it, the best way to cool your MacBook is to simply let it rest until the case temperature returns to normal, or until you get out of the sun.